Forbes Names 10 IAB Members to Its List of Most Promising Companies in America // Via iab.net


Forbes just released its second annual list of America’s Most Promising Companies and technology is an overall theme this year.The world is clearly being dominated by more tech and digital companies. No surprise, then, that the IAB had two members in the top 10, seven in the top 50, and ten in the top 100.

By Jeff Fryer (@jfryer2000)

Their list also clearly demonstrates the link between digital, innovation, and the economic contribution of the ad-supported Internet on the U.S. economy – confirming a study which we released last October with the Harvard Business School.

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Please join us in congratulating Rocket Fuel (#4), OpenX (#7), AdRoll (#30), ShareThis (#35), Mixpo (#39), Rubicon Project (#40), BlueKai (#50), Bizo (#62), LocalResponse (#67), and Media6Degrees (#71). We’d like to recognize each of them as a testament to the energy of American entrepreneurship and the role that it plays in driving innovation and the U.S. economy forward. 

It’s also a wonderful reminder of the impact and leadership our membership has each day. We salute you! See the full Forbes

Leer más “Forbes Names 10 IAB Members to Its List of Most Promising Companies in America // Via iab.net”

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JOBS Why the Future Depends on Today’s Discouraged Workers

The economy, the stock market and even the November elections will largely be determined by a group of people who are almost invisible to forecasters.

Economists, investment advisors and political strategists are closely watching the unemployment rate. But few commentators acknowledge just how faulty the employment statistics are. One key problem is that a crucial group of people can’t be tracked and measured. These are the so-called discouraged workers, who have given up looking for employment. They are the economic equivalent of astrophysicists’ dark matter – the particles scattered throughout the universe that can’t be seen but have enough mass to alter the course of everything we can see.Jaime Monfort / Getty Images

There have always been discouraged workers, of course, but the recent recession has multiplied their number. And it has enlarged a related category, as well, those who could be described as disgruntled workers – the underemployed, who have been forced to accept jobs with fewer hours or lower pay than they would like. These two groups aren’t counted in the unemployment rate either because they aren’t listed as looking for work or because they are listed as already working.

The uncounted include people who lost their jobs and spent months unsuccessfully looking for new ones until they finally gave up; women, and some men, who would like to work but have decided it makes more financial sense to stay home and care for kids instead; and teenagers who have not been able to find entry-level jobs. There are also older middle managers who have had to take early retirement even though they would prefer to continue working. To those groups, add anyone who lost a job and ended up having to accept a new one that was worse.

And why do these people matter so much? As I see it, it breaks down into three basic reasons…


By MICHAEL SIVY | @MFSivy | http://business.time.com JAIME MONFORT / GETTY IMAGES
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The economy, the stock market and even the November elections will largely be determined by a group of people who are almost invisible to forecasters.

Economists, investment advisors and political strategists are closely watching the unemployment rate. But few commentators acknowledge just how faulty the employment statistics are. One key problem is that a crucial group of people can’t be tracked and measured. These are the so-called discouraged workers, who have given up looking for employment. They are the economic equivalent of astrophysicists’ dark matter – the particles scattered throughout the universe that can’t be seen but have enough mass to alter the course of everything we can see.Jaime Monfort / Getty Images

There have always been discouraged workers, of course, but the recent recession has multiplied their number. And it has enlarged a related category, as well, those who could be described as disgruntled workers – the underemployed, who have been forced to accept jobs with fewer hours or lower pay than they would like. These two groups aren’t counted in the unemployment rate either because they aren’t listed as looking for work or because they are listed as already working.

The uncounted include people who lost their jobs and spent months unsuccessfully looking for new ones until they finally gave up; women, and some men, who would like to work but have decided it makes more financial sense to stay home and care for kids instead; and teenagers who have not been able to find entry-level jobs.  There are also older middle managers who have had to take early retirement even though they would prefer to continue working. To those groups, add anyone who lost a job and ended up having to accept a new one that was worse.

And why do these people matter so much? As I see it, it breaks down into three basic reasons… Leer más “JOBS Why the Future Depends on Today’s Discouraged Workers”

Want To Make A Lot Of Money As A CEO? Fire People

The 50 top CEO layoff leaders received $12 million on average in 2009, compared to the S&P 500 average of $8.5 million. Each of the corporations surveyed laid off at least 3,000 workers between November 2008 and April 2010. Seventy-two percent of the firms announced mass layoffs at a time of positive earnings reports.

At a time when we should be pulling together to strengthen our shared economic futures, CEOs should not be rewarded for slashing jobs,” says IPS Senior Scholar Chuck Collins. “Realigning the interests of CEOs with their employees and the rest of our country would be good for the economy and national morale.”

It’s disturbing that down-sizing CEOs have earned more recently, but it would be extremely disturbing if the government could control companies behavior in this regard.


investmentbankersandchampagne
CEOs who fire people tend to make more money. That’s been the trend recently, according to ‘CEO Pay and The Great Recession’ from the Institute for Policy Studies.

IPS:

The 50 top CEO layoff leaders received $12 million on average in 2009, compared to the S&P 500 average of $8.5 million. Each of the corporations surveyed laid off at least 3,000 workers between November 2008 and April 2010. Seventy-two percent of the firms announced mass layoffs at a time of positive earnings reports.

At a time when we should be pulling together to strengthen our shared economic futures, CEOs should not be rewarded for slashing jobs,” says IPS Senior Scholar Chuck Collins. “Realigning the interests of CEOs with their employees and the rest of our country would be good for the economy and national morale.” Leer más “Want To Make A Lot Of Money As A CEO? Fire People”

Help! I Lost My Job!

Unemployment tips and resources for the recently laid off

Here are tips and resources to help if you have just been laid off or you suspect that you will soon be laid off. Check our other guides to job hunting, earning extra income, and ways to cope if you hate your job. Also check out the sidebar for links to job boards and other job hunting resources.


Unemployment tips and resources for the recently laid off

Here are tips and resources to help if you have just been laid off or you suspect that you will soon be laid off. Check our other guides to job hunting, earning extra income, and ways to cope if you hate your job. Also check out the sidebar for links to job boards and other job hunting resources. Leer más “Help! I Lost My Job!”

The Perilous Problem of the Persistently Jobless

Posted by Stephen Gandel

For a time now my editor Rick Stengel has been asking the question: Why won’t unemployment stay at around 10%. That is to say, even after the economy pulls out of the recession how do we know that unemployment won’t remain where it is today. Perhaps 10% is the new 5%, when it comes to unemployment. We have afterall outsourced many of our manufacturing jobs and some of our service jobs to China, India and elsewhere. So if we make a lot less than we used to and do a lot less than we used to, whose to say that unemployment won’t remain stubbornly high, no matter which way the economy is headed.

My response a year ago or so ago when Stengel started to ask the question was because it can’t. I majored in Economics and know from my classes that the long-run frictionless rate of unemployment in the economy is about 5%. Once the economy got a kick-start, that’s where the jobs numbers would be headed again rather quickly.


Posted by Stephen Gandel

For a time now my editor Rick Stengel has been asking the question: Why won’t unemployment stay at around 10%. That is to say, even after the economy pulls out of the recession how do we know that unemployment won’t remain where it is today. Perhaps 10% is the new 5%, when it comes to unemployment. We have afterall outsourced many of our manufacturing jobs and some of our service jobs to China, India and elsewhere. So if we make a lot less than we used to and do a lot less than we used to, whose to say that unemployment won’t remain stubbornly high, no matter which way the economy is headed.

My response a year ago or so ago when Stengel started to ask the question was because it can’t. I majored in Economics and know from my classes that the long-run frictionless rate of unemployment in the economy is about 5%. Once the economy got a kick-start, that’s where the jobs numbers would be headed again rather quickly. Leer más “The Perilous Problem of the Persistently Jobless”

Can Cost-Based Innovation Help Solve Our Debt Crisis?

Each of us are painfully aware of the new economic reality in which we find ourselves: national, state, and local government debt is skyrocketing. Simply put, it costs a lot more to provide and maintain government services than is taken in through taxes and other sources of revenue and thus we are forced to borrow to cover the difference. Every commentator on this subject offers essentially only three near-term solutions to the problem: raise taxes (there’s also a good argument for lowering taxes), cut services and programs, and reduce the civil service payroll. And while all of these have historically played an important role in some form of debt remediation, I’m struck by the absence of the role of innovation in this national discourse. I’m not talking about entrepreneurial innovation which of course is a considerable generator of income and taxes; I’m talking specifically about cost-based innovation.


by Jonathan Reichental in Cost Improvement, Innovation, Society

Each of us are painfully aware of the new economic reality in which we find ourselves: national, state, and local government debt is skyrocketing. Simply put, it costs a lot more to provide and maintain government services than is taken in through taxes and other sources of revenue and thus we are forced to borrow to cover the difference. Every commentator on this subject offers essentially only three near-term solutions to the problem: raise taxes (there’s also a good argument for lowering taxes), cut services and programs, and reduce the civil service payroll.  And while all of these have historically played an important role in some form of debt remediation, I’m struck by the absence of the role of innovation in this national discourse. I’m not talking about entrepreneurial innovation which of course is a considerable generator of income and taxes; I’m talking specifically about cost-based innovation. Leer más “Can Cost-Based Innovation Help Solve Our Debt Crisis?”

Pfffft, the danger of premature shipment

The old economy demanded a flurry of hard work, obsessive focus, and a charrette before launch. Launches were expensive and rare, and managers and co-workers would push to get everything just right before hitting the big red button to announce, ship and launch. The attention demanded by this scarcity raised the game, overcame fear and pushed things from one level to another.

A big reason for the push is to ameliorate risk. Launching is risky business, and one way to diminish that risk in a world of scarcity and market noise is to go big. And then big becomes a habit.


The old economy demanded a flurry of hard work, obsessive focus, and a charrette before launch. Launches were expensive and rare, and managers and co-workers would push to get everything just right before hitting the big red button to announce, ship and launch. The attention demanded by this scarcity raised the game, overcame fear and pushed things from one level to another.

A big reason for the push is to ameliorate risk. Launching is risky business, and one way to diminish that risk in a world of scarcity and market noise is to go big. And then big becomes a habit. Leer más “Pfffft, the danger of premature shipment”