43% of all LinkedIn users are in the US, IBM is the company with the most followers

In almost all countries, there are more men registered on LinkedIn than women, with the exception of a few countries, mostly in Asia and Eastern Europe, including China, the Philippines, Romania, Finland, Vietnam, Bulgaria, Serbia and Jamaica, where female users outnumber their male counterparts, if even by a little.

We recently took a look at LinkedIn’s growth in Indonesia, where it now has over 1 million registered users, and is growing at a rate faster than Facebook. According to LinkedIn itself, we can expect far more insights into the professional world through the social network’s data in the coming months.


linkedin

Zoomsphere, a site which provides statistics on major social networks including Twitter, Facebook and Google+, has just revealed some interesting information and statistics on LinkedIn users.

It’s not surprising to find that the US has the most registered users on LinkedIn, with well over 61 million to its name. India comes in a distant second with over 14 million registered users. The US and India are joined in the top 10 by the UK, Brazil, Canada, France, Netherlands, Italy, Australia and Spain.

Far more interesting, in the revealed statistics, is which companies have the most followers on the professional social media site. In the US, IBM comes in at the top of the list with over 580,000 followers.

In comparison, IBM only has just over 13,000 followers on its main Twitter account and 93,000 fans on Facebook. It is worth mentioning that the number of IBM employees on LinkedIn currently sits at over 280,000, Next in line on LinkedIn, in order of follower count are HP, Microsoft, Google and Oracle. Apple comes in at 7th place with only 251,000 followers.

Clearly, just as the nature of interactions on each social network differs, users follow a company on Twitter or Facebook for vastly different reasons than following a company on LinkedIn.

The most followed company does change by region, with Unilever topping the list in the UK, Research in Motion in Canada, Huawei in China, and Ferrari in Italy.

Despite the fact that the majority of the most followed companies are IT-related, the most common industry on LinkedIn is Higher Education, followed by Information Technology and Services, with Financial Services coming in third.

Industry 43% of all LinkedIn users are in the US, IBM is the company with the most followers

More than half of the companies list on LinkedIn have over 10,000 employees, with the number of companies decreasing as the number of employees decrease.

companysize 43% of all LinkedIn users are in the US, IBM is the company with the most followersThe most common age group on LinkedIn is, unsurprisingly, 35-44, followed closely by the 25-34 age group. There are more 18-24 year olds on LinkedIn than there are professionals over the age of 55.

Age1 43% of all LinkedIn users are in the US, IBM is the company with the most followers

Worldwide, LinkedIn has over 143 million registered users, 43% of which are in the US.

ReigsteredUsers 43% of all LinkedIn users are in the US, IBM is the company with the most followers

In almost all countries, there are more men registered on LinkedIn than women, with the exception of a few countries, mostly in Asia and Eastern Europe, including China, the Philippines, Romania, Finland, Vietnam, Bulgaria, Serbia and Jamaica, where female users outnumber their male counterparts, if even by a little.

We recently took a look at LinkedIn’s growth in Indonesia, where it now has over 1 million registered users, and is growing at a rate faster than Facebook. According to LinkedIn itself, we can expect far more insights into the professional world through the social network’s data in the coming months.

The Internet Is Still Not For Everyone

In countries like the Democratic Republic of Congo, Liberia and Burundi, the percentage of population connected is around 0.5%. Mozambique with its 22 million inhabitants barely reaches 2.8%.

In Asia the situation is no better. Out of a total of 3.8 billion people, slightly more than 21% of them have access to the Internet. The reasons are manifold and lie in part in the geography of the area, characterized by open rural areas with average population density, in which the diffusion of the Internet is almost absent, in part in the boost of some repressive governments which imposed, through censorship, a substantial degree of control and access blocking.

In China the number of users connected to the network is around 420 million on an estimated population of about 1.3 billion people (approximately 31%). For other countries in the Far East such as Bangladesh, the rate of Internet penetration is around 0.4% for 158 million people, while it reaches only 0.2% for Myanmar (one of the countries with the highest degrees of on-line censorship) that has 53 million inhabitants.

Far more encouraging are the data coming from Europe and North America where the percentages of users connected to the network, respectively, are around 58% and 77% of the population. In these areas, in macroscopic terms, the best economic conditions combined with higher levels of education and the widespread dissemination of the network are the key factors behind the reduced gap compared to other countries.

For Europe, in absolute terms, Germany is the country with the highest number of users connected to the Internet, over 65 million, or 79% of the population, while the regions at the bottom of the list are located in the Eastern Europe, especially Bosnia-Herzegovina (31 %) and Kosovo (20.8%) which are still paying the heavy legacy of being struck by the Balkans war, during the first half of 1990.

In Russia, just under 43% of the population uses the Internet while in the U.S. and Canada the figure is over 77%.
Lastly, in Latin America and the Caribbean the number of users of the network stops at 34% of the total population. Even in these areas, the lack of infrastructure in a spread throughout the territory and it is one of the main reasons for the limited diffusion.

Argentina is the country with the highest rate of users connected to the network with about 64%. Brazil and Mexico, respectively 201 million and 112 million inhabitants, reached only 38% and 27%. Last places for Bolivia (11%), Cuba (% 14) and Nicaragua (10%).


By Antonio Lupetti @woork
It radically changed the way we all interact and it has become the main medium of mass communication of our (if not all) time. Nevertheless it is used by just a few. How and why the Internet is still a technology available to less than 29% of the global population.

Full article:
http://woorkup.com/2010/10/05/the-internet-is-still-not-for-everyone/

The Most Controversial (uhhh excellent, nice, vale la pena…) Magazine Covers of All Time

We’ve put together a collection of magazine covers that have stirred up controversy through the years.

These covers can serve as object lessons for what to do and what not to do both with design and editorial.

While some controversial covers have worked and sold more magazines, or won awards for the editors who made the decision to go to press with them, others were embarrassments that the publication had to either apologize for, or fire an editor over.

Here are some of the most controversial magazine covers of all time. Feel free to suggest other covers that you think should be part of this collection.


We’ve put together a collection of magazine covers that have stirred up controversy through the years.

These covers can serve as object lessons for what to do and what not to do both with design and editorial.

While some controversial covers have worked and sold more magazines, or won awards for the editors who made the decision to go to press with them, others were embarrassments that the publication had to either apologize for, or fire an editor over.

Here are some of the most controversial magazine covers of all time. Feel free to suggest other covers that you think should be part of this collection.

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Time Magazine, January 2, 1939: Hitler as Man of the Year

This cover featured an elaborate illustration of Hitler playing “his hymn of hate in a desecrated cathedral while victims dangle on a St. Catherine’s wheel while the Nazi hierarchy looks on.” Baron Rudolph Charles von Ripper was a Catholic that fled Hitler’s Germany, and the artist of this disturbing piece. By 1938, Hitler had firmly seized power in Germany, taken over Austria and Czechoslovakia, and had been given a free hand in Eastern Europe by the English prime minister of the time, Neville Chamberlain. Time has had to defend this choice throughout history, and at the time defended it by stating that the “Man of the Year” was a title bestowed on the person who had most influenced events of the previous year.

Time Magazine, April 8, 1966: Is God Dead?

This cover has been called the most controversial of all time. The related article concerned the “death of god movement” that had sprung up in the 1960’s. The cover and article enraged readers.

Leer más “The Most Controversial (uhhh excellent, nice, vale la pena…) Magazine Covers of All Time”

The Reason Behind the Success of Reverse Innovation

The road to reverse innovation

In his article What is Reverse Innovation, Vijay Govindarajan outlines the following historical phases:

1. Globalization: companies designing and manufacturing in developed markets products that are “de-featured” for export to emerging markets that can’t afford the fully featured original product.
2. Glocalization: companies still de-featuring products from developed markets but now localizing production in emerging markets to take advantage of lower labor costs.
3. Local innovation: companies now designing in emerging markets products that are directly suited to the local needs. (Manufacturing continues to take place locally for costs reasons.)
4. Reverse innovation: companies designing and manufacturing in emerging markets for local use AND export to the developed markets (with or without some level of scaling-up).


by Yann Cramer

The Rise of SimplicityThanks to a number of spectacular successes obtained by blue-chip companies in recent years, Reverse Innovation is becoming a popular trend. Examples include GE’s portable ultra-sound equipment designed in China and sold worldwide, LG’s low cost air conditioner designed in India and sold worldwide, Renault’s Logan low-cost model designed for Eastern European markets and now selling on Western Europe, etc.

In an enlightening article, Vijay Govindarajan outlines a historical perspective from globalisation to reverse innovation, and highlights the key driver behind this evolution: the revenue gap between developed and emerging markets. But there are other drivers that may be less visible but no less powerful.

The road to reverse innovation

In his article What is Reverse Innovation, Vijay Govindarajan outlines the following historical phases:

  1. Globalization: companies designing and manufacturing in developed markets products that are “de-featured” for export to emerging markets that can’t afford the fully featured original product.
  2. Glocalization: companies still de-featuring products from developed markets but now localizing production in emerging markets to take advantage of lower labor costs.
  3. Local innovation: companies now designing in emerging markets products that are directly suited to the local needs. (Manufacturing continues to take place locally for costs reasons.)
  4. Reverse innovation: companies designing and manufacturing in emerging markets for local use AND export to the developed markets (with or without some level of scaling-up). Leer más “The Reason Behind the Success of Reverse Innovation”