5 Great Social Networks Every Designer Should Know About


The emergence of niche-based social networks creates exciting new meeting points for people of similar interests and professionals. Designers are lucky enough to have a variety of social networks tailor-made especially for them. The web is full of opportunities for designers to connect, converse and increase the overall creativity-share. Check out the following list of awesome social talent hubs, where designers can explore, get inspired and share their feedback.

Dribbble

Social Networks Every Graphic Designer Should Know About

Once coined the “Twitter of designers”,  Dribbble is like show and tell for designers, developers and other creatives. Dribbble is a phenomenal hub of activity and inspiration. It hosts a growing group of talented and creative minds. Members on Dribbble share sneak peeks of their work in the form of “shots”- small screenshots of the designs they are currently working on. Other members then comment and give feedback on the work presented. You can sign up either as a prospect – a designer who would like to be invited to share work, or as a scout – if you are seeking designers for a project.

Threadless

Social Networks Every Graphic Designer Should Know About

Threadless is a social eCommerce network for artists. The designs posted on Threadless are created by a community of skilled designers. Each week, different shirt or product designs are submitted online and put to a vote. The site staff reviews the top-scoring designs and selects the winners, which are then printed on clothing and other related products. The items are later sold through an online store and at the retail store in Chicago. Printed artwork at Threadless ranges from beautiful and elegant to humorous and whimsical. Amazing creativity and talent are never short. Leer más “5 Great Social Networks Every Designer Should Know About”

Anuncios

Exceptional Dribbble Invite Shots

What To Do To Become a Player?

First of all, prepare several mind-blowing designs or make screenshots of your best of the best previous works. Type of design does not matter. Your samples can be dedicated to website design, graphic design, icons design, typography, illustrations etc.

Secondly, sign up as a prospect and surf for a spare invitation in order to enter into the game. Be prepared, there will be a plenty of people who want to become a Dribbble player so you have to be very quick since invitations tend to go like hotcakes.

But never fear, members give away at least one invitation fairly often so you can bump into it anytime and someday become a proud part of all the action.

So What Should You Look For?

In order to facilitate your search we want to give you an idea of what these Dribbble invite shots tend to look like. With so many talented people involved in the community it should be no surprise that they create really unique and remarkable “invite to give away” shots. Many of them use this opportunity to create something special and show their creativity. Below is a showcase of some of these fantastic designs.


 

By  |  noupe.com

Dribbble is one of the most famous online designers community. It’s an amazing gallery where people can show screenshots of their recent or upcoming works and share high-quality freebies with others. But Dribbble is not only place where you can show off your skills, it is also a source for inspiration, and a place where you can ask for an opinion or help from professionals in the field. Thus, this community can help you to become a more mature designer.

Since this site is a concentration of serious people not everyone can become a part of it. This is an invite only community, so the only way to get in is to earn a special invitation that can come either from players (invited members) or team.

[Note: Have you already pre-ordered your copy of our Printed Smashing Book #3? The book is a professional guide on how to redesign websites and it also introduces a whole new mindset for progressive Web design, written by experts for you.]

What To Do To Become a Player?

First of all, prepare several mind-blowing designs or make screenshots of your best of the best previous works. Type of design does not matter. Your samples can be dedicated to website design, graphic design, icons design, typography, illustrations etc.

Secondly, sign up as a prospect and surf for a spare invitation in order to enter into the game. Be prepared, there will be a plenty of people who want to become a Dribbble player so you have to be very quick since invitations tend to go like hotcakes.

But never fear, members give away at least one invitation fairly often so you can bump into it anytime and someday become a proud part of all the action.

So What Should You Look For?

In order to facilitate your search we want to give you an idea of what these Dribbble invite shots tend to look like. With so many talented people involved in the community it should be no surprise that they create really unique and remarkable “invite to give away” shots. Many of them use this opportunity to create something special and show their creativity. Below is a showcase of some of these fantastic designs.

The Invite Shots

Lots of designers use brand colors and logos to draw attention.

1. By Eddie Lobanovskiy
Dribbble invite shot by Eddie Lobanovskiy

2. By Mike
Dribbble invite shot by Mike Leer más “Exceptional Dribbble Invite Shots”

How To Use the “Seven Deadly Sins” to Turn Visitors into Customers

Since the beginning of time, people have exploited the human desire to sin so that they could achieve their goals. Finding out what causes people to sin helps us understand the triggers which prompt people to take an action. The Web has made it even easier to exploit these tendencies to sin, in order to build user engagement and excitement about your service or product. In this article we’ll show examples of how successful companies exploit the tendency to conduct all the famous Seven Deadly Sins, and in turn generate momentum with their website visitors. Ready? Let’s roll.
Sin #1: Pride

Pride is defined as having an excessively high opinion of oneself. You must remember someone from your school days who had an extremely high sense of their personal appearance or abilities. That’s pride at work. On the Web, this sin will help you sell your product. Every website visitor wants to be associated with a successful service that other people might find impressive.

People want to say: “Yes, Fortune 500 companies use this tool and I use it as well,” or “Yes, I got on the homepage of Dribbble in front of thousands of other designers; that’s the type of work I do.” In all these examples, people are proud of their achievements and the website helps them show their pride. Here are examples of this first sin in action:

Showing off your customers. People want to use tools that big brands use. SEOmoz does a great job of fronting up the logos of famous companies that pay for their tools, with a simple call to action prompting you to be as successful as these top brands. This entices users to try this tool: “I want to use something big brands use.”



Since the beginning of time, people have exploited the human desire to sin so that they could achieve their goals. Finding out what causes people to sin helps us understand the triggers which prompt people to take an action. The Web has made it even easier to exploit these tendencies to sin, in order to build user engagement and excitement about your service or product. In this article we’ll show examples of how successful companies exploit the tendency to conduct all the famous Seven Deadly Sins, and in turn generate momentum with their website visitors. Ready? Let’s roll.

Sin #1: Pride

Pride is defined as having an excessively high opinion of oneself. You must remember someone from your school days who had an extremely high sense of their personal appearance or abilities. That’s pride at work. On the Web, this sin will help you sell your product. Every website visitor wants to be associated with a successful service that other people might find impressive.

People want to say: “Yes, Fortune 500 companies use this tool and I use it as well,” or “Yes, I got on the homepage of Dribbble in front of thousands of other designers; that’s the type of work I do.” In all these examples, people are proud of their achievements and the website helps them show their pride. Here are examples of this first sin in action:

Showing off your customers. People want to use tools that big brands use. SEOmoz does a great job of fronting up the logos of famous companies that pay for their tools, with a simple call to action prompting you to be as successful as these top brands. This entices users to try this tool: “I want to use something big brands use.” Leer más “How To Use the “Seven Deadly Sins” to Turn Visitors into Customers”

Purpose in Functionality

As a web designer/developer, I’ve found that there exist several common (if not nearly universal) truths when it comes to clients. One of these is that they love to talk about functionality. I have had several clients whose initial approach when they contact me is to provide me with a complete list of functionality – in other words, a listing of what they think that their website needs to do.

What I tend not to get quite so often is a description of what the purpose of the site is.

To my way of thinking, that is a problem. Recently, I wrote an article entitled “HTML (and CSS) do not a Website Make,” in which I discussed some of the things that I thought constituted a website. Obviously, part of the argument that I make is that a website is more than just its HTML and CSS, and one of the areas that I touch on is the notion of purpose. I think that some of what I wrote there has an important bearing on what I want to discuss in this article, so instead of rewriting it, I will simply quote my original words:

Every website should have a purpose. It may be to inform potential customers about your business (probably one of the most common types of websites). It may be to function as an informational resource. It may be to connect people with other people. It may be to showcase yourself, or even simply to entertain. Whatever the purpose is, it is ultimately the core of the site, the nucleus around which everything else that we have looked at so far is ultimately wrapped.


By Matt Ward | http://designm.ag/resources/purpose-in-functionality/

As a web designer/developer, I’ve found that there exist several common (if not nearly universal) truths when it comes to clients. One of these is that they love to talk about functionality. I have had several clients whose initial approach when they contact me is to provide me with a complete list of functionality – in other words, a listing of what they think that their website needs to do.

What I tend not to get quite so often is a description of what the purpose of the site is.

To my way of thinking, that is a problem. Recently, I wrote an article entitled “HTML (and CSS) do not a Website Make,” in which I discussed some of the things that I thought constituted a website. Obviously, part of the argument that I make is that a website is more than just its HTML and CSS, and one of the areas that I touch on is the notion of purpose. I think that some of what I wrote there has an important bearing on what I want to discuss in this article, so instead of rewriting it, I will simply quote my original words:

Every website should have a purpose. It may be to inform potential customers about your business (probably one of the most common types of websites). It may be to function as an informational resource. It may be to connect people with other people. It may be to showcase yourself, or even simply to entertain. Whatever the purpose is, it is ultimately the core of the site, the nucleus around which everything else that we have looked at so far is ultimately wrapped. Leer más “Purpose in Functionality”

Five Useful Design Techniques and Coding Solutions For Web Designers

As designers, we have to create an intuitive user experience, solve design problems and provide a beautiful and functional user interfaces. Unlike print design, we don’t have the luxury of designing in a static area; rather, our canvas is ever-changing in its content, browser width, page length and more. We do need to be able to code to some extent and be able to build a design around a structure of code. Yet, with these complications comes an opportunity for unique functionality, interactive effects and better user experience.

In this article, we’ll look at five useful coding solutions that we’ve stumble upon recently. All of these solutions enhance a website’s design, not just the code. These solutions affect the user interface and the user’s interaction with the design, and they can make for a more usable and interactive website.
1. Bar Graph Effect For Multiple Items

This effect (pictured below) can be a great way to add some oomph to a Web page, and make it more user-friendly. Its functionality goes beyond just being a cool trick, though. By organizing any set of items on a page — such as tags, categories, comments, product count — a designer can enhance user interaction, provide useful content clues and improve usability. By seeing a count of items such as tags and product types, the visitor can quickly get an idea of what the website mostly consists of. This is a great way to make quick connections with targeted visitors.

For comment counts, visitors can quickly see where the discussions are at. Highlights on highly commented posts can reinforce user-to-user interaction.

Pictured below are two examples of this design. The left organizes tags, and the second ranks the most commented posts on a blog. Be sure to visit both websites to see the full functionality and CSS effects.


By Kayla Knight
Full article
http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/10/07/5-useful-coding-solutions-for-web-designers/

As designers, we have to create an intuitive user experience, solve design problems and provide a beautiful and functional user interfaces. Unlike print design, we don’t have the luxury of designing in a static area; rather, our canvas is ever-changing in its content, browser width, page length and more. We do need to be able to code to some extent and be able to build a design around a structure of code. Yet, with these complications comes an opportunity for unique functionality, interactive effects and better user experience.

In this article, we’ll look at five useful coding solutions that we’ve stumble upon recently. All of these solutions enhance a website’s design, not just the code. These solutions affect the user interface and the user’s interaction with the design, and they can make for a more usable and interactive website.

1. Bar Graph Effect For Multiple Items

This effect (pictured below) can be a great way to add some oomph to a Web page, and make it more user-friendly. Its functionality goes beyond just being a cool trick, though. By organizing any set of items on a page — such as tags, categories, comments, product count — a designer can enhance user interaction, provide useful content clues and improve usability. By seeing a count of items such as tags and product types, the visitor can quickly get an idea of what the website mostly consists of. This is a great way to make quick connections with targeted visitors.

For comment counts, visitors can quickly see where the discussions are at. Highlights on highly commented posts can reinforce user-to-user interaction.

Pictured below are two examples of this design. The left organizes tags, and the second ranks the most commented posts on a blog. Be sure to visit both websites to see the full functionality and CSS effects. Leer más “Five Useful Design Techniques and Coding Solutions For Web Designers”

20+ New Apps and Websites for Designers

New apps and websites seem to appear on an almost-daily basis.

Trying to find the best ones each week or month can be tough, especially considering how many come out that aren’t that great.

Here we’ve compiled some of the best apps and websites that have come out in the past few months.

Some are apps closely tied to a web designer’s daily work, while others aren’t likely to be used as often, but are still useful.

If you want to share a recent web app or website useful to designers, please send a tweet to @cameron_chapman for inclusion in our next monthly roundup.


thumbNew apps and websites seem to appear on an almost-daily basis.

Trying to find the best ones each week or month can be tough, especially considering how many come out that aren’t that great.

Here we’ve compiled some of the best apps and websites that have come out in the past few months.

Some are apps closely tied to a web designer’s daily work, while others aren’t likely to be used as often, but are still useful.

If you want to share a recent web app or website useful to designers, please send a tweet to @cameron_chapman for inclusion in our next monthly roundup. Leer más “20+ New Apps and Websites for Designers”