Using Outlook.com with your own Web Domain | labnol.org


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How do you setup the new Outlook mail service on a custom web domain so that your email address reads like you@yourdomain.com instead of you@outlook.com?

If you are on Google Apps, you can leave your existing setup untouched and access your Gmail account from inside Outlook.com via POP3. This is a recommended option if you are just experimenting with Outlook and aren’t ready to make the complete switch to Outlook (see: Gmail vs Outlook).

The disadvantage with the above approach is that your incoming mails won’t be delivered to your Outlook mailbox instantly. They’ll first land in your Gmail inbox, Outlook will issue a fetch request after a minute or two and only then will your messages show up in Outlook.

Alternatively, you can remove Gmail from the loop and let Outlook.com handle all your incoming and outgoing email traffic. Here’s how you do that in five easy steps.

Outlook on Custom Web Domain

Guide: Setup Outlook on a Custom Domain Leer más “Using Outlook.com with your own Web Domain | labnol.org”

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Comcast Cares, una historia de twitter como plataforma de relación con clientes

A principios de 2008, una “telco” americana llamada Comcast sufrió un tremendo castigo al verse en la parte más baja del Índice de Satisfacción de Clientes de EEUU, un estudio que monitoriza las opiniones de más de 200 empresas americanas.

Comcast comenzó a conocerse por sus malas prácticas de negocio y su deficiente servicio al cliente. Tanto fue así, que fue colgada en la red una página llamada ComcastMustDie.com (Comcastdebemorir) en la que cientos de clientes comenzaron a publicar sus quejas.

Estaba claro que Comcast tenía que reaccionar. Fue cuando Frank Eliasson, por aquel entonces director de servicio online de la Compañía, comenzó a monitorizar las quejas de los clientes a través de Twitter.

Para sorpresa de muchos de estos clientes, Frank Eliasson abrió la cuenta @ComcastCares en Twitter y comenzó a contactar con ellos estableciendo un diálogo con el objetivo de calmar los ánimos y encontrar soluciones a los problemas que habían manifestado.


por Francisco Javier Sánchez
http://www.marketingcomunidad.com/comcast-cares-una-historia-de-twitter-como-plataforma-de-relacion-con-clientes.html

A principios de 2008, una “telco” americana llamada Comcast sufrió un tremendo castigo al verse en la parte más baja del Índice de Satisfacción de Clientes de EEUU, un estudio que monitoriza las opiniones de más de 200 empresas americanas.

Comcast comenzó a conocerse por sus malas prácticas de negocio y su deficiente servicio al cliente. Tanto fue así, que fue colgada en la red una página llamada ComcastMustDie.com (Comcastdebemorir) en la que cientos de clientes comenzaron a publicar sus quejas.

Estaba claro que Comcast tenía que reaccionar. Fue cuando Frank Eliasson, por aquel entonces director de servicio online de la Compañía, comenzó a monitorizar las quejas de los clientes a través de Twitter.

Para sorpresa de muchos de estos clientes, Frank Eliasson abrió la cuenta @ComcastCares en Twitter y comenzó a contactar con ellos estableciendo un diálogo con el objetivo de calmar los ánimos y encontrar soluciones a los problemas que habían manifestado. Leer más “Comcast Cares, una historia de twitter como plataforma de relación con clientes”

5 Fundamental Steps to Deploying a Website

Something that is overlooked by a lot of web designers and developers is what is actually involved in the deployment of a website; the process when you’ve finished developing the site, tested to make sure it works, and are ready to push it to a live web server.

In a lot of cases, you will be dealing with clients who are getting their website for the first time, and there is nothing for you to really consider apart from the hosting solution to set them up on. As time goes on, you will start getting larger clients that may have existing websites already, or who have more complicated needs. You may find yourself in a scenario where the outcome could be a very unhappy client with data loss and a whole company’s worth of missing emails and site assets. Here are some basic steps that will ensure that you have covered all the bases for a smooth website deployment.
Step 1: Preparation

There are a few things to consider when you are finalizing a website, and they all depend on what type of deployment you will be completing.

The three general scenarios of a website deployment is:

1. The client has nothing (i.e. this is their first website)
2. The client already has hosting and you will be deploying the site on their server
3. The client already has hosting but you will be moving to a new server

The first scenario is the most desired because you are starting with a blank slate. Scenarios 2 and 3 are a bit trickier and involve a more thoughtful deployment process.

Once you have worked out what your deployment scenario is, you will be able to better prepare yourself for everything you need to do in order to carry out a smooth transition from the old website to the new one.

If you are dealing with scenario 1, then all you need to do is register their domain name and purchase (or provide) web hosting. Simple and fast deployment.

Scenarios 2 and 3 require some information gathering. You need domain management credentials for the existing web host so that you can manage the DNS records (more on this in a bit). You will find that, in many cases, the client has no idea what these are or where to get them, so you will need to do as much as you can before you approach your client.

So let’s gather information on our own. We can use a tool like whois.domaintools.com to find out some information about the existing domain name.


by Mark Biegel | http://sixrevisions.com/web-development/5-fundamental-steps-to-deploying-a-website/

5 Fundamental Steps to Deploying a Website

Something that is overlooked by a lot of web designers and developers is what is actually involved in the deployment of a website; the process when you’ve finished developing the site, tested to make sure it works, and are ready to push it to a live web server.

In a lot of cases, you will be dealing with clients who are getting their website for the first time, and there is nothing for you to really consider apart from the hosting solution to set them up on. As time goes on, you will start getting larger clients that may have existing websites already, or who have more complicated needs. You may find yourself in a scenario where the outcome could be a very unhappy client with data loss and a whole company’s worth of missing emails and site assets. Here are some basic steps that will ensure that you have covered all the bases for a smooth website deployment.

Step 1: Preparation

There are a few things to consider when you are finalizing a website, and they all depend on what type of deployment you will be completing.

The three general scenarios of a website deployment is:

  1. The client has nothing (i.e. this is their first website)
  2. The client already has hosting and you will be deploying the site on their server
  3. The client already has hosting but you will be moving to a new server

The first scenario is the most desired because you are starting with a blank slate. Scenarios 2 and 3 are a bit trickier and involve a more thoughtful deployment process.

Once you have worked out what your deployment scenario is, you will be able to better prepare yourself for everything you need to do in order to carry out a smooth transition from the old website to the new one.

If you are dealing with scenario 1, then all you need to do is register their domain name and purchase (or provide) web hosting. Simple and fast deployment.

Scenarios 2 and 3 require some information gathering. You need domain management credentials for the existing web host so that you can manage the DNS records (more on this in a bit). You will find that, in many cases, the client has no idea what these are or where to get them, so you will need to do as much as you can before you approach your client.

So let’s gather information on our own. We can use a tool like whois.domaintools.com to find out some information about the existing domain name. Leer más “5 Fundamental Steps to Deploying a Website”