Which Will Be Bigger? Social TV or 3DTV?

The BBC has confirmed they are working on a new beta version of their popular on-demand television service, the iPlayer. As a public broadcaster, the BBC relies on tax dollars to an extent, to stay in business. They seem to be taking Social TV quite seriously – investing and setting new trends with social viewing. The Beeb has partnered with Microsoft to develop an iPlayer that allows users to communicate with each other using Windows Live Messenger while watching on-demand programmes. With over 450 million worldwide Windows Live Messenger users, it seems to make sll kinds of sense for the broadcaster to use the Messenger network. This partnership is interesting in that the BBC has chosen to not leverage social sites Facebook or Twitter – meaning BBC doesn’t want to “create” their own social network … rather they have left the door open to harness third party social sites in the future. I don’t know how well the Windows Live Messenger can be shared on all social sites, but one would think that down the road this avenue will pay off big time for the BBC. iPlayer is not just available on the web, but across all desktop operating systems, dozens of mobile phones and in download and streaming form – even across some 3G networks – and BBC’s on-demand service received 123 MILLION requests in April 2010. Those are massive numbers for an on-demand service in the broadcast industry.


Posted by jillatkinson

We North Americans witnessed the birth of Social Television via Big Network Events such as the Oscars and MTV Music Video Awards Shows last year. Social TV’s birth happened in the form of live Twitter and Facebook feeds that crawled across the bottom of our TV screens, allowing viewers to chat, comment and react to what they were watching live.

The BBC has confirmed they are working on a new beta version of their popular on-demand television service, the iPlayer. As a public broadcaster, the BBC relies on tax dollars to an extent, to stay in business. They seem to be taking Social TV quite seriously – investing and setting new trends with social viewing. The Beeb has partnered with Microsoft to develop an iPlayer that allows users to communicate with each other using Windows Live Messenger while watching on-demand programmes. With over 450 million worldwide Windows Live Messenger users, it seems to make sll kinds of sense for the broadcaster to use the Messenger network. This partnership is interesting in that the BBC has chosen to not leverage social sites Facebook or Twitter – meaning BBC doesn’t want to “create” their own social network … rather they have left the door open to harness third party social sites in the future. I don’t know how well the Windows Live Messenger can be shared on all social sites, but one would think that down the road this avenue will pay off big time for the BBC. iPlayer is not just available on the web, but across all desktop operating systems, dozens of mobile phones and in download and streaming form – even across some 3G networks – and BBC’s on-demand service received 123 MILLION requests in April 2010. Those are massive numbers for an on-demand service in the broadcast industry. Leer más “Which Will Be Bigger? Social TV or 3DTV?”