CanvasPop Lets You Print Out Your Facebook Photos & Hang Them As Art

While smartphone users take millions of photos, how many times do we seen them outside a smartphone or computer screen.

CanvasPop prints out images and frames ranging from 8×10 to 24×72 with prices ranging from $30 to $419. On top of that, you can either print out the image on a regular page or get a frame included with it with white wood and espresso wood frames available as choices.


http://www.simplyzesty.com

If you regularly upload photos onto Facebook, chances are you’ve a number of photos that you feel are impressive enough to be displayed on your wall. If that’s the case, a U.S. company called CanvasPop, a company that prints out uploaded and Instagram photos, have expanded their service so that you can blow up and print out your own Facebook photos.

That means that any photo taken with a digital camera or smartphone can be blown up. One of the immediate problems with such a service is that if you blow up a photo that’s both small and stored on low resolution, than blowing it up will make it look pixelated and blurry. The company has solved that by developing a process over the last two years which allow them to upsize images, which they’ve been doing for Instagram users over the last six months.

Also the company centres around artistic photography (the inclusion of the word ‘canvas’ hints towards this), allowing you to choose between various filters – similar to what you would see on Instagram – before printing them out for you >>>> Leer más “CanvasPop Lets You Print Out Your Facebook Photos & Hang Them As Art”

Best Compact Digital Cameras

Are you looking for the best compact camera that will fit in your pocket? We invited our friends from Geefts – the gifts for geeks bible – to recommend the hottest compact digital cameras on the market now.


http://inspiredm.com/best-compact-digital-cameras/

 

Are you looking for the best compact camera that will fit in your pocket? We invited our friends from Geefts – the gifts for geeks bible – to recommend the hottest compact digital cameras on the market now.

Fujifilm X100 12.3 MP Digital Camera


In amongst a flurry of of major camera announcements at Photokina 2010, one model stole the show – Fujifilm’s retro-looking, large sensor, fixed lens compact: the X100 ($1199). With its APS-C CMOS sensor and fast 23mm F2 lens giving a classic 35mm equivalent moderate wideangle view, this rangefinder-styled camera has traditional control dials plus an innovative ‘hybrid’ viewfinder that combines a large, bright optical finder with a high-resolution electronic display. We’ve been itching to get our hands on the X100 ever since it was announced, and Fujifilm has kindly lent us a prototype model for a first look. Click through to read more at dpreview.com.

Leica D-LUX5 10.1 MP Compact Digital Camera


The D-Lux 5 ($799) is a true Leica, not only in terms of its elegant design but also in its superior optical performance: the result are images of excellent quality. This versatile compact camera featuring a fast Leica Summicron zoom lens with focal-lengths from 24 to 90mm (35mm equivalent), is the perfect camera for a broad spectrum of photgraphic situations: from macro and wide angle architecture to landscape, from reportage to portrait and available-light photography. Manual setting options and an extensive range of accessories provide even greater creative freedom. With such versatile performance in such a compact package, the D-Lux 5 is the perfect companion whenever you seek inspiration – in Berlin or anywhere else in the world.

Fujifilm X10 12 MP EXR CMOS Digital Camera


The Fujifilm X10 ($599.95) digital camera feature a new larger 2/3-inch 12-megapixel EXR CMOS sensor and a bright, high-definition Fujinon F2.0 wide-angle to F2.8 telephoto, 4x manual zoom lens (28-112mm) with a proprietary Super EBC (Electron Beam Coating) that produces superb image quality from edge to edge.

Kodak PlayFull Dual Video and 12 MP Camera


The Kodak Dual Camera ($199.95) gives you the best of both worlds. Features high-speed video, a mic jack, and a built-in flash for optimal performance in any environment. The Kodak Dual Camera offers the potent combination of an impressive 1080p @ 60 fps HD video camera and a fully featured 12 MP BSI CMOS digital camera in one streamlined device. Sharing it all is simple. Just press Kodak’s Share button to tag to Facebook, Email, YouTube, and more…. Leer más “Best Compact Digital Cameras”

10 David Ogilvy Quotes that Could Revolutionize Your Blogging

This week, I’ve been reading The King of Madison Avenue—an interesting biography of ad man David Ogilvy (aff).

I’ve always been fascinated with Ogilvy and see a lot in what he’s done as relevant to bloggers. So here’s some of his more famous quotes, with a few thoughts on how they relate to our medium.
1. “The consumer isn’t a moron; she is your wife.”

How appropriate—both for internet marketers (who are often known for tactics that treat those they target as morons) and bloggers (who can at times talk down to readers).

The idea of treating your reader as someone who you value, as someone incredibly special to you, will take bloggers a long way.

Another Ogilvy quote that relates: “Never write an advertisement which you wouldn’t want your family to read. You wouldn’t tell lies to your own wife. Don’t tell them to mine.”
2. “The best ideas come as jokes. Make your thinking as funny as possible.”

I’ve been pondering this one a lot over the last 24 hours and it’s true—some of my best blog posts and projects have emerged out of light-hearted tweets or comments in conversations to friends.

31 Days to Build a Better Blog came about as I laughed with a friend about how bloggers needed a daily devotion (similar to what I grew up with as a good Christian boy reading Every day with Jesus) to keep their blogs on track.

7 Digital Camera Predators and How to Keep them at Bay started as a friend and I joked about things that conspired to kill our cameras.

It’s often the crazy little ideas that we have that first make us laugh that do best. If they get some kind of reaction in us (even one that makes us giggle at how silly they are), they’re likely to also get a reaction from others.


http://www.problogger.net/archives/2011/02/02/10-david-ogilvy-quotes-that-could-revolutionize-your-blogging/

__ShSCuaESlVk_TODWUMK3g8I_AAAAAAAAAec_wUrCCc_jc3I_s400_david-ogilvy.jpgThis week, I’ve been reading The King of Madison Avenue—an interesting biography of ad man David Ogilvy (aff).

I’ve always been fascinated with Ogilvy and see a lot in what he’s done as relevant to bloggers. So here’s some of his more famous quotes, with a few thoughts on how they relate to our medium.

1. “The consumer isn’t a moron; she is your wife.”

How appropriate—both for internet marketers (who are often known for tactics that treat those they target as morons) and bloggers (who can at times talk down to readers).

The idea of treating your reader as someone who you value, as someone incredibly special to you, will take bloggers a long way.

Another Ogilvy quote that relates: “Never write an advertisement which you wouldn’t want your family to read. You wouldn’t tell lies to your own wife. Don’t tell them to mine.

2. “The best ideas come as jokes. Make your thinking as funny as possible.”

I’ve been pondering this one a lot over the last 24 hours and it’s true—some of my best blog posts and projects have emerged out of light-hearted tweets or comments in conversations to friends.

31 Days to Build a Better Blog came about as I laughed with a friend about how bloggers needed a daily devotion (similar to what I grew up with as a good Christian boy reading Every day with Jesus) to keep their blogs on track.

7 Digital Camera Predators and How to Keep them at Bay started as a friend and I joked about things that conspired to kill our cameras.

It’s often the crazy little ideas that we have that first make us laugh that do best. If they get some kind of reaction in us (even one that makes us giggle at how silly they are), they’re likely to also get a reaction from others. Leer más “10 David Ogilvy Quotes that Could Revolutionize Your Blogging”

The Best OCR Tools for Converting Images to Text

OCR software let you easily convert images, such as digital photographs, scanned documents, printed books, etc. into text. Once you perform OCR on an image, you’ll be able to copy-paste or edit the text content of that image without any retyping and it also becomes more searchable.
The Best Web-based OCR Services

Most scanners ship with some sort of OCR software but if you don’t have a scanner, you can simply capture a photograph of the printed text with your digital camera or even your mobile phone and then use an online OCR utility to extract text out of that image.

Meet the best online OCR services that can help you convert images into text.


OCROCR software let you easily convert images, such as digital photographs, scanned documents, printed books, etc. into text. Once you perform OCR on an image, you’ll be able to copy-paste or edit the text content of that image without any retyping and it also becomes more searchable.

The Best Web-based OCR Services

Most scanners ship with some sort of OCR software but if you don’t have a scanner, you can simply capture a photograph of the printed text with your digital camera or even your mobile phone and then use an online OCR utility to extract text out of that image.

Meet the best online OCR services that can help you convert images into text. Leer más “The Best OCR Tools for Converting Images to Text”

Data on Demand Is an Opportunity

The real-time Web is a bit of a chaotic mess.

Each minute, hundreds, if not thousands, of tweets, links, likes, status updates and their ilk stampede through our collective feeds.

Of course, that isn’t to say there isn’t valuable and timely information embedded in that deluge – if you’re lucky to catch it. The constant churn makes it challenging to store and sift through the bits and pieces of information worth remembering.

Is there a better way to harness it?

If so, Brian Ascher, a partner at Venrock, a noted venture capital firm in Palo Alto, Calif., wants to invest in it.

“The whole point of social media is that we trust our friends, our network for answers to questions, recommendations, information needs,” he said. “Social media can contain the answer. There is value in all the stuff being shared, if you can find it.”

In short, he said, the key concept is data on demand:

“I think its going to be more appealing to a mass audience wondering why do I care where you check-in or what you’re doing. It might yield the answer to a question you have about where to go three months from now.”


Image representing Venrock as depicted in Crun...
Image via CrunchBase

By JENNA WORTHAM

The real-time Web is a bit of a chaotic mess.

Each minute, hundreds, if not thousands, of tweets, links, likes, status updates and their ilk stampede through our collective feeds.

Of course, that isn’t to say there isn’t valuable and timely information embedded in that deluge – if you’re lucky to catch it. The constant churn makes it challenging to store and sift through the bits and pieces of information worth remembering.

Is there a better way to harness it?

If so, Brian Ascher, a partner at Venrock, a noted venture capital firm in Palo Alto, Calif., wants to invest in it.

“The whole point of social media is that we trust our friends, our network for answers to questions, recommendations, information needs,” he said. “Social media can contain the answer. There is value in all the stuff being shared, if you can find it.”

In short, he said, the key concept is data on demand:

“I think its going to be more appealing to a mass audience wondering why do I care where you check-in or what you’re doing. It might yield the answer to a question you have about where to go three months from now.” Leer más “Data on Demand Is an Opportunity”

Is Consumerism Killing Our Creativity?

Have you ever fallen into a black hole of comparison shopping? You’re looking for a new digital camera, for instance. You head over to Cnet.com and read some reviews of various cameras, watch the video demos, identify the model you want. Then perhaps you employ Google’s shopping search to price out the options and find the best deal. All of the sudden, it’s four hours later. You’ve found the perfect camera, but your purchasing triumph is tainted by a creeping feeling of, well, disgust. Couldn’t that time have been used better?I was thinking recently about what my biggest distractions were – the things keeping me from pushing my creative projects forward. As I scanned through my daily activities, I found that the most insidious distraction was, in fact, things. More specifically, the wanting, hunting, and getting of things – whether they be tangible (a new computer) or intangible (information).


article

by Jocelyn K. Glei

Have you ever fallen into a black hole of comparison shopping? You’re looking for a new digital camera, for instance. You head over to Cnet.com and read some reviews of various cameras, watch the video demos, identify the model you want. Then perhaps you employ Google’s shopping search to price out the options and find the best deal. All of the sudden, it’s four hours later. You’ve found the perfect camera, but your purchasing triumph is tainted by a creeping feeling of, well, disgust. Couldn’t that time have been used better?I was thinking recently about what my biggest distractions were – the things keeping me from pushing my creative projects forward. As I scanned through my daily activities, I found that the most insidious distraction was, in fact, things. More specifically, the wanting, hunting, and getting of things –  whether they be tangible (a new computer) or intangible (information). Leer más “Is Consumerism Killing Our Creativity?”

Mark Hadfield, planning director at Nexus/H explains why digital applications need to be more natural

Digital applications have never been so analog.

There’s an app on the iPhone called Hipstamatic. It’s a digital app on a smartphone using a digital camera. It’s not an old analog machine with bits that click and touch and move and interact, it’s a bunch of code designed to emulate something much older.

The resultant images are as you’d expect from an old camera. The colours are a bit washed out, there’s a bit of fade and blur thrown in there and when you take enough of them you notice that it is just a bunch of code. For example, there’s a horizontal banding effect in the same place on the images. That’s the algorithm for that particular ‘lens’ and ‘film.’

Why should those algorithms manufacture those effects when nature can deliver them in a more authentic way?


27 May 2010

Technology has always been focussed on making things faster and easier for the user.

Technology has allowed people to do complicated things simply and has allowed the user minimum opportunity to make mistakes. Rely on the technology and you’ll get first class results quickly and easily.

But easy isn’t always the best way.
Leer más “Mark Hadfield, planning director at Nexus/H explains why digital applications need to be more natural”