Even low blood lead levels are associated with gout


Gout, which has been called “the disease of kings,” is associated with the lifestyle that most people in the industrialized world enjoy these days. It will affect about 1-2 percent of adults in richer countries at one point or another over the course of their lives, which have lengthened considerably since the days when kings were the rule rather than the exception. About half of all cases of the painful arthritic condition occur in the big toe.

Lead exposure has long been known to be strongly associated with susceptibility to gout. But in a new study published in Annals of Internal Medicine, Stanford rheumatologist Eswar Krishnan, MD, and his colleagues used data from an annual federal health survey, the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey, to show that the risk of gout increases even at very blood levels of lead – about one-twentieth of that considered to be “elevated” under current standards promoted by organizations such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization. Leer más “Even low blood lead levels are associated with gout”

A Unified Theory of Social Change

A Unified Theory of Social Change
Here’s the plan in three parts: First set daring, breathtaking, Apollo-like goals and deadlines for each problem we aim to tackle. Not 50 years off. Not 30 years off. Dates that people working today will still be around to be held accountable to.

Second, collaborate and communicate like there’s no tomorrow, using the collective impact modelthat brings all community players together, and aligns them on goals, and holds them accountable. And third, bring economic freedom to the nonprofit sector by employing multiplication philanthropy — that is, by investing in fundraising to dramatically increase the capital available to solve huge problems.

Gigantic goals, collective impact, and the liberation of the sector to achieve both. Converge those three things into one another like atoms in a particle accelerator and Boom! the world will start to change.


by DAN PALLOTTA | http://blogs.hbr.org/

Dan Pallotta

Dan Pallotta is an expert in nonprofit sector innovation and a pioneering social entrepreneur. He is the founder of Pallotta TeamWorks, which invented the multiday AIDSRides and Breast Cancer 3-Days. He is the president of Advertising for Humanity and the author of Uncharitable: How Restraints on Nonprofits Undermine Their Potential.

Most conversations about changing the world eventually degenerate into despair or, after a hands-in-the-air “well, anyway…” segue, they lapse into a conversation about something more practical or pressing. That’s because most discussions related to big change are about tactics rather than strategy at the scale of the question — and nothing’s more depressing than a tactical discussion when a strategic one is required. It creates the illusion of impossibility; makes us feel like we’re no match for the huge social challenges facing us. We start to doubt that they can actually be overcome.

If we want to change the world, we need a strategic plan. So here it is. Leer más “A Unified Theory of Social Change”

Do We Retire at 65? An Innovation Story

Here’s an interesting question:

Why is the Retirement Age 65 in most developed countries?

I’ll give you a second to think about it. Or google it.

Here’s a hint: the retirement age of 65 was first selected in 1880.

Here’s the answer: the retirement age was set at 65 because when it was first introduced by Otto von Bismarck, hardly anyone lived that long. Here’s a quick rundown on that:

The age of 65 was originally selected as the time for retirement by the “Iron Chancellor,” Otto von Bismark of Germany, when he introduced a social security system to appeal to the German working class and combat the power of the Socialist Party in Germany during the late 1800s. Somewhat cynically, Bismark knew that the program would cost little because the average German worker never reached 65, and many of those who did lived only a few years beyond that age. When the United States finally passed a social security law in 1935 (more than 55 years after the conservative German chancellor introduced it in Germany), the average life expectancy in America was only 61.7 years.


Posted by TimothyKastelle

Here’s an interesting question:
Why is the Retirement Age 65 in most developed countries?
I’ll give you a second to think about it. Or google it.
Here’s a hint: the retirement age of 65 was first selected in 1880.
Here’s the answer: the retirement age was set at 65 because when it was first introduced by Otto von […]

Here’s an interesting question:

Why is the Retirement Age 65 in most developed countries?

I’ll give you a second to think about it. Or google it.

Here’s a hint: the retirement age of 65 was first selected in 1880.

Here’s the answer: the retirement age was set at 65 because when it was first introduced by Otto von Bismarck, hardly anyone lived that long. Here’s a quick rundown on that:

The age of 65 was originally selected as the time for retirement by the “Iron Chancellor,” Otto von Bismark of Germany, when he introduced a social security system to appeal to the German working class and combat the power of the Socialist Party in Germany during the late 1800s. Somewhat cynically, Bismark knew that the program would cost little because the average German worker never reached 65, and many of those who did lived only a few years beyond that age. When the United States finally passed a social security law in 1935 (more than 55 years after the conservative German chancellor introduced it in Germany), the average life expectancy in America was only 61.7 years. Leer más “Do We Retire at 65? An Innovation Story”

As China Ages, Marketers Must Take Note


Don't abandon baby girls: the characters in re...Image via Wikipedia

Earlier in the day I went through the current statistics and demographics for China through 3 different infographics. This is a build-up to this article for marketers who wish to expand into the Chinese economy. A recent Nielsen report states that, marketers must evaluate their portfolios carefully prior to expanding in China.

From what we can see, there are a couple of brands, targeted to different demographic groups, or those that work well other less-developed nations may struggle in China. This could be due to their one-child policy and other core changes in the Chinese society.

One-Child Policy

Since the institution of the above policy in 1979, there has been a reduction of births by over 250 million. Population growth in China has been falling every year from 3% in the 1960s to an estimated fall below 0.5% per year by 2017. The United Nations predicted that China will stop growing entirely by the year 2032. On top of that, by around 2028, India will surpass China in population and become the world’s largest economy.

China-Aging-Chart Leer más “As China Ages, Marketers Must Take Note”