Further proof the U.S. is gadget hungry: We now have more internet connected gadgets than people


by Robert Nazarian on Jan 3rd 2013, 9:52am
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I don’t this is going to be a shocker to anyone, but it sure is eye-opening when you consider that there are now more internet connected devices than people in the U.S. According to the NPD Group, there are about 425 million such gadgets in homes that consist of smartphones, tablets, gaming consoles, and of course desktop computers and laptops. With 311 million people, it’s a lock that this spread will continue to grow. Leer más “Further proof the U.S. is gadget hungry: We now have more internet connected gadgets than people”

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Los dispositivos en la Era Post-PC


Lincinews

En los años ’70 la sociedad conoció por primera vez lo que era un computador y fue a mediados de los ’80 que comenzó la guerra entre Mac y Microsoft, sentando los precedentes del nacimiento de una era digital que no tenía fecha de término a la vista.

40 años han pasado y las variaciones que los computadores han sufrido han sido innumerables. De hecho, cada vez es más común ver menos computadores de escritorio, pero más y más laptops, consolas de videojuegos, tablets, televisores inteligentes, smartphones, etc.

La siguiente infografía muestra cómo los diversos gadgets han ido adquiriendo protagonismo en la era post-PC.

Y tú, ¿aún usas un computador o lo has ido cambiando por una X Box, iPad y iPhone?

Its about people not devices

We live in exciting times. Times of innovation, invention, and rapid change. Technologies that were unthinkable years ago are now commonplace. Close to 1.5 billion people worldwide use a computer, but that figure pales in comparison to the 4.2 billion (75% of the planet) who use or have access to a mobile phone.

If you’re new to mobile design (and most people are), you may be looking for guidelines or best practices to inform your work. When you find them, they will most likely sound something like this:

* Mobile is different from traditional (primarily desktop) computing.
* The desktop is about broadband, big displays, full attention, a mouse, keyboard and comfortable seating. Mobile is about poor connections, small screens, one-handed use, glancing, interruptions, and (lately), touch screens.
* You may spend hours seated in front of the same computer, but mobile context is ever-changing. This impacts (amongst other things) the users’ locations, their attention, their access to stable connectivity, and the orientation of their devices.
* Desktop computers are ideal for consumption of lengthy content and completion of complex interactions. Mobile interactions and content should be simple, focused, and should (where possible) take advantage of unique and useful device capabilities.
* Mobile devices are personal, often carrying a wealth of photos, private data, and treasured memories. This creates unique opportunities, but privacy is also a real concern.
* There are many mobile platforms, each with its own patterns and constraints. The more you understand each platform, the better you can design for it.
* And then there are tablets. As you may have noticed, they’re larger than your average mobile device. We’re also told they’re ideal for reading.

Designing for mobile without an understanding of these key differences can lead to all sorts of problems, including clumsy interactions, high latency, poor usability, and more than a few missed opportunities to create that “long wow.” The problem however is that while these unique mobile characteristics are correct, our very concept of what constitutes a mobile device (and therefore mobile behavior) is constantly evolving.


http://www.uxbooth.com/blog/its-about-people-not-devices/

This post is part of a series authored by the speakers of the upcoming UX London conference. As media sponsors, we’re proud to provide exclusive introductions to the topics that will comprise the event!

We live in exciting times. Times of innovation, invention, and rapid change. Technologies that were unthinkable years ago are now commonplace. Close to 1.5 billion people worldwide use a computer, but that figure pales in comparison to the 4.2 billion (75% of the planet) who use or have access to a mobile phone.

If you’re new to mobile design (and most people are), you may be looking for guidelines or best practices to inform your work. When you find them, they will most likely sound something like this:

  • Mobile is different from traditional (primarily desktop) computing.
  • The desktop is about broadband, big displays, full attention, a mouse, keyboard and comfortable seating. Mobile is about poor connections, small screens, one-handed use, glancing, interruptions, and (lately), touch screens.
  • You may spend hours seated in front of the same computer, but mobile context is ever-changing. This impacts (amongst other things) the users’ locations, their attention, their access to stable connectivity, and the orientation of their devices.
  • Desktop computers are ideal for consumption of lengthy content and completion of complex interactions. Mobile interactions and content should be simple, focused, and should (where possible) take advantage of unique and useful device capabilities.
  • Mobile devices are personal, often carrying a wealth of photos, private data, and treasured memories. This creates unique opportunities, but privacy is also a real concern.
  • There are many mobile platforms, each with its own patterns and constraints. The more you understand each platform, the better you can design for it.
  • And then there are tablets. As you may have noticed, they’re larger than your average mobile device. We’re also told they’re ideal for reading.

Designing for mobile without an understanding of these key differences can lead to all sorts of problems, including clumsy interactions, high latency, poor usability, and more than a few missed opportunities to create that “long wow.” The problem however is that while these unique mobile characteristics are correct, our very concept of what constitutes a mobile device (and therefore mobile behavior) is constantly evolving. Leer más “Its about people not devices”