El sistema se sostiene con la Generación de EXPERTOS, que muchas veces nos dejan idiotas…


Porqué escribir un libro donde te enseño los 897 pasos para ser rico?, quizás porque el primero de ellos, sea Compra éste Libro?/ @gabrielcatalano , en estado de crítico!

El sistema se sostiene con la Generación de EXPERTOS, que muchas veces nos dejan idiotas… carentes de análisis.

No leas, no quiero… es una necesidad de expresión personal!, y seguro no estarás de acuerdo. XQ ni yo lo estoy!. El sistema se sostiene con la Generación de EXPERTOS, que muchas veces nos dejan idiotas.

No no, sí realmente lo soy. Para ello estudié y sigo haciéndolo.
En qué me convierto una vez trasnochado?, en un idiota…?

GNx – ON “E” 

Tantos… gurúes, blogs, foros y en todo tipo de redes.
Hablando sobre engagement, atracción de tráfico, consumo, haciendo futurismo sobre próximos lanzamientos. Casi brujos todos los años predicen las tendencias, que en realidad, todos re publicamos, comentamos, compramos y asentimos…

Es tal vez qué hemos olvidado aprender a escuchar a quienes debemos. A quiénes nos hablan. Y a quiénes piden exactamente lo que quieren.

Además: Los cambios constantes, permiten la generación de EXPERTOS?

La base es la misma: Maslow, Marshall, Freud, Ogilvy… más techie, más hype…, more search!, more issues? Ya lo han dicho y predecido… (hasta la irrupción de The Matrix, conceptulamente por WachoBRO)…

Éstos son… aquí están!
Leer más “El sistema se sostiene con la Generación de EXPERTOS, que muchas veces nos dejan idiotas…”

David Ogilvy: Writing Tips for Ad Agency New Business


Foto de David MacKenzie Ogilvy
Foto de David MacKenzie Ogilvy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

See on Scoop.itGabriel Catalano the name of the game

David Ogilvy remains one of the most famous names in advertising and continues to provide us with relevant content marketing tips.

In 1948, at the age of 37, Ogilvy founded the agency that would become Ogilvy & Mather. Starting with only a staff of two and no clients, he built his agency into one of the eight largest advertising networks in the world. Today it has more than 450 offices in 169 cities.

Included in this collection of Ogilvy’s writings and speeches is a personal letter and a staff memo. Both are rich with tips and insights that will help you to create better copy to use as a magnet for new business.

David Ogilvy remains one of the most famous names in advertising and continues to provide us with relevant content marketing tips.
In 1948, at the age of 37, Ogilvy founded the agency that would become Ogilvy & Mather. Starting with only a staff of two and no clients, he built his agency into one of the eight largest advertising networks in the world. Today it has more than 450 offices in 169 cities.

“On the occasion of his 75th birthday, Ogilvy’s staff put a book together of all Ogilvy’s best memos and speeches [The Unpublished David Ogilvy]. This is a particularly insightful book, because Ogilvy was maybe one of the most gifted leaders when it came to creating a corporate culture. And as his company grew to over 200 offices, he knew the only way he could protect the culture was by constantly communicating with his people.

In the following letter to Mr. Ray Calt, Ogilvy provides us with a list of his habits as a copywriter.
April 19, 1955
Dear Mr. Calt:

On March 22nd you wrote to me asking for some notes on my work habits as a copywriter. They are appalling, as you are about to see:
I have never written an advertisement in the office. Too many interruptions. I do all my writing at home. Leer más “David Ogilvy: Writing Tips for Ad Agency New Business”

A Simpler Way Forward for Web Design


After using apps and browsing Web-optimized sites on smartphones and tablets, accessing the Web on a laptop feels unnecessarily cumbersome. Getting to content is done much faster and more easily on mobile devices, as their interfaces are less cluttered. Yet, this clutter is there for a reason, which left me to wonder how Web designers approach, or should approach, design as a means of delivering content.

Capturing audience attention on the Web is now harder than ever. People are no longer delighted by overwrought graphic elements that compete with the actual content. Many site visitors use the “Reader” button on iOS devices, or apps such as Instapaper or Readability, that strip away the design to present just the text and images. In that sense, we’ve all put away childish things, and there is a yearning out there for elegant simplicity that Web designers urgently need to address if they want their messages to be seen.

Simplicity and usability are not just functional benefits, they generate satisfaction and leave a positive emotional impression in users. Our founder, David Ogilvy, would agree that effective interfaces don’t have to come at the expense of creativity. In fact, effectiveness is intrinsic to beauty and storytelling.

A few crucial Web design tenets are beginning to make their appearance. Some of them are topics that designers have been discussing for years but never totally embraced, while others really are new, and have been prompted by technological advances. However, when applied all together, these approaches can drastically change the way people experience the Web:

Ruthlessly Focused Content Strategies Leer más “A Simpler Way Forward for Web Design”

10 Tips on Writing from David Ogilvy | de los tipos que rompieron el molde…


http://bit.ly/LF9w3t

by  | brainpickings.org

“Never write more than two pages on any subject.”

How is your new year’s resolution to read more and write better holding up? After tracing the fascinating story of the most influential writing style guide of all time and absorbing advice on writing from some of modern history’s most legendary writers, here comes some priceless and pricelessly uncompromising wisdom from a very different kind of cultural legend: iconic businessman and original “Mad Man” David Ogilvy. On September 7th, 1982, Ogilvy sent the following internal memo to all agency employees, titled “How to Write”:

The better you write, the higher you go in Ogilvy & Mather. People who think well, write well.

Woolly minded people write woolly memos, woolly letters and woolly speeches.

Good writing is not a natural gift. You have to learn to write well. Here are 10 hints:

1. Read the Roman-Raphaelson book on writing. Read it three times.

2. Write the way you talk. Naturally.

3. Use short words, short sentences and short paragraphs.

4. Never use jargon words like reconceptualize,demassificationattitudinallyjudgmentally. They are hallmarks of a pretentious ass.

5. Never write more than two pages on any subject.

6. Check your quotations.

7. Never send a letter or a memo on the day you write it. Read it aloud the next morning — and then edit it.

8. If it is something important, get a colleague to improve it.

9. Before you send your letter or your memo, make sure it is crystal clear what you want the recipient to do.

10. If you want ACTION, don’t write. Go and tell the guy what you want.

David Leer más “10 Tips on Writing from David Ogilvy | de los tipos que rompieron el molde…”

La evolución del profesional de las relaciones públicas: de Julio César a Mark Zuckerberg

Las relaciones públicas no son ni mucho menos un invento de la era moderna. En realidad, el primer gran profesional de las relaciones públicas fue el emperador romano Julio César. Una infografía publicada porPRWeb recoge la evolución de esta disciplina en los últimos 2.000 años.


http://www.marketingdirecto.com 

Las relaciones públicas no son ni mucho menos un invento de la era moderna. En realidad, el primer gran profesional de las relaciones públicas fue el emperador romano Julio César. Una infografía publicada porPRWeb recoge la evolución de esta disciplina en los últimos 2.000 años.

50 a.C: Julio César se vale de la biografía La Guerra de las Galias para convencer a los romanos de su elección como jefe de estado.

394 d.C: San Agustín era para el emperador de Roma el equivalente moderno del jefe de prensa de un presidente.

1776: Thomas Paine escribió un panfleto que convenció al ejército de Estados Unidos de luchar por la independencia del país contra Inglaterra, pese a las inclemencias del invierno.

Década de 1780: Benjamin Franklin fue pionero en la utilización de los medios impresos para dar voz a problemas como la educación, el abolicionismo y la seguridad nacional.

Década de 1840: P.T. Barnum promocionó con tanto éxito Ringling Bros. y Barnum & Baily Circus que su nombre sigue siendo aún conocido después de 120 años de su muerte.

1807: El secretario de Estado de Lincoln, William Seward, logró conectar con grandes audiencias gracias a su poder sobre la prensa.

1903: Las relaciones públicas se convierten por fin en una profesión. Ivy Lee es contratado por John D. Rockefeller para manejar las relaciones públicas de la familia Rockefeller y de Standard Oil.

1923: Edward Bernays publicó el primer libro sobre relaciones públicas: Crystalizing Public Opinion. Después, introdujo la idea de utilizar la psicología para las relaciones públicas.

Década de 1940: Antes de fundar Ogilvy & Mather, David Ogilvy aplicó con éxito la filosofía de la relaciones públicas al mundo de la diplomacia.

1982: Albert Tortorella, de Burson Marsteller, se la ingenió para sacar a Johnson & Johnson de una grave crisis de comunicación.

Década de 2000: El desarrollo de Facebook y otras redes sociales cambia radicalmente la manera en que las marcas y los consumidores interactúan, creando nuevas oportunidades para las relaciones públicas.  INFOGRAFIA >>> Leer más “La evolución del profesional de las relaciones públicas: de Julio César a Mark Zuckerberg”

10 tips para escribir por David Ogilvy

Del casi inconseguible: The Unpublished David Ogilvy: A Selection of His Writings from the Files of His Partners hay un decálogo que deberíamos tener en cuenta todos los que, profesionalmente o no, escribimos aunque sea en un simple weblog:

Cuanto mejor escribas, más alto vas a llegar en Ogilvy & Mather.
La gente que sabe pensar, escribe bien.

La gente con mente confusa, escribe memos confusos, cartas confusas y discursos confusos.

La buena escritura no es un regalo divino. Tenés que aprender a escribir bien. Acá hay 1o consejos…


http://www.uberbin.net

Foto de David MacKenzie Ogilvy

Del casi inconseguible: The Unpublished David Ogilvy: A Selection of His Writings from the Files of His Partners 10 tips para escribir por David Ogilvy hay un decálogo que deberíamos tener en cuenta todos los que, profesionalmente o no, escribimos aunque sea en un simple weblog:

Cuanto mejor escribas, más alto vas a llegar en Ogilvy & Mather.
La gente que sabe pensar, escribe bien.

La gente con mente confusa, escribe memos confusos, cartas confusas y discursos confusos.

La buena escritura no es un regalo divino. Tenés que aprender a escribir bien. Acá hay 1o consejos… Leer más “10 tips para escribir por David Ogilvy”

Dedicado a los publicitarios que nunca han vendido nada en su vida

La publicidad es para vender: si no, ¿para qué invertimos en ella? De tanto pensar en ganar premios, en resultar más sorprendentes e ingeniosos que el vecino (esto es para muchos “ser creativos”) estamos perdiendo el foco de nuestra profesión.
¿Por qué en las agencias, los más admirados son los tipos que se inventan los spots? En un mundo donde llegamos a recibir 5.000 impactos publicitarios al día, ¿lo que importa verdaderamente es el formato y el medio en el que aparecemos? ¿O importa más entrar en contacto allí donde el mensaje pueda ser más nítido? Y sobre todo, aparecer siempre con el mismo rostro y ofreciendo un valor claro al receptor para que se acerque a nosotros en lugar de huir despavorido.
¿Por qué las personas empleamos un lenguaje coloquial para comunicarnos y sin embargo las marcas se comunican con las personas por medio de la retórica? ¿De verdad puedo colarme en la vida de alguien cuando adopto un rostro edulcorado y que realmente no me corresponde?


http://www.javierregueira.com/

Hoy he decidido darle la vuelta a un artículo que escribí hace un año.  Empezaré por el último párrafo y terminaré por el primero.

Mis tres pensamientos de partida de hoy

  • La publicidad es para vender: si no, ¿para qué invertimos en ella?  De tanto pensar en ganar premios, en resultar más sorprendentes e ingeniosos que el vecino (esto es para muchos “ser creativos“) estamos perdiendo el foco de nuestra profesión.
  • ¿Por qué en las agencias, los más admirados son los tipos que se inventan los spots?  En un mundo donde llegamos a recibir 5.000 impactos publicitarios al día, ¿lo que importa verdaderamente es el formato y el medio en el que aparecemos?  ¿O importa más entrar en contacto allí donde el mensaje pueda ser más nítido?  Y sobre todo, aparecer siempre con el mismo rostro y ofreciendo un valor claro al receptor para que se acerque a nosotros en lugar de huir despavorido.
  • ¿Por qué las personas empleamos un lenguaje coloquial para comunicarnos y sin embargo las marcas se comunican con las personas por medio de la retórica?  ¿De verdad puedo colarme en la vida de alguien cuando adopto un rostro edulcorado y que realmente no me corresponde?

Pondría a todo creativo fundamentalista a vender enciclopedias Leer más “Dedicado a los publicitarios que nunca han vendido nada en su vida”