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BMW THE HIRE: LO QUE CONVIERTE UN CONTENIDO EN UN ÉXITO

La serie de cinco cortos para retransmisión on line titulada “The Hire”(2001), detrás de la cual está el fabricante de automóviles BMW me sigue pareciendo uno de los mejores casos de éxito en el ámbito de los contenidos.

Los cortometrajes fueron creados por la agencia Fallon con el objetivo de atraer nuevos clientes menores de cuarenta años a la marca.  El mismo ejercicio que BMW ha tenido que realizar (exitosamente) en todo el mundo en los últimos 10 años: rejuvenecer la marca para acceder a una base de consumidores más amplia y proteger las bases de su participación de mercados futura.  Como suelo decir a menudo (lo aprendí de un cliente de Philip Morris hace años): la participación que una marca disfruta entre los más jóvenes es el mejor calibre de su salud futura, ya que equivale a la que disfrutará el conjunto de la marca dentro de 15/20 años.

Si quieres competir en el ámbito de los contenidos, convierte tu marca en una productora

Para desarrollar el proyecto, BMW fundó su propia productora y abrió una web titulada bmwfilms.com para la distribución en exclusiva de las películas.Además, para asegurar un producto cinematográfico de la más alta calidad, reclutó para los rodajes a directores y actores de la talla de Ridley Scott, David Fincher, Toni Scott, Gary Oldman, Madonna, o Clive Owen

La web se cerró después de cuatro años con unos impresionantes resultados de audiencia: once millones de descargas y dos millones de usuarios registrados en su web.

Si aspiras a ganar un premio, que sea un premio cinematográfico

Además de sus logros comerciales, la campaña logró alzarse con el Gran Premio de los ciberleones en el Festival de Publicidad de Cannes en 2002

Pero, lo que es más importante teniendo en cuenta ese reto (nuevo, distinto y ambiciosísimo de que BMW crease contenidos de entretenimiento competitivos), es que uno de los cortometrajes,titulado “Hostage”, se alzó con el premio al mejor corto de acción en el Festival de cine de Los Angeles.

El contenido, de acción extrema y de corte innovador, encaja como un guante con los valores que la marca BMW pretende proyectar: potencia, tecnología y diseño de vanguardia y fiabilidad.  Esto sucede cuando la marca co-produce el contenido desde el minuto 1, en lugar de que queremos encasquetarle con calzador un contenido previamente desarrollado por un tercero…

¿Factores de éxito?  Full article! 😀

 

Looking for Entrepreneurial Tips in ‘The Social Network’

“People want to go on the internet and check out their friends, so why not build a website that offers them friends, pictures, profiles — whatever. You can visit, browse around, maybe it’s someone you just met at a party. I’m not talking about a dating site, I’m talking about taking the entire social experience of college and putting it online.”

Just like you, it all started with an idea — a concept that perhaps no one has ever come up with before, finding a niche that needs filling or a service that your customers can’t do without.

So before you dismiss The Social Network as inaccurate or a work of fiction, consider what you can learn from Facebook’s rags-to-riches story. And if you really don’t want to see the movie, read one of the books about Facebook’s rise to prominence. Check out Mezrich’s book mentioned above or The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company That Is Connecting the World, written by David Kirkpatrick.


The Social Network opens in theaters nationwide on Friday amidst a deafening buzz about Facebook‘s co-founder, Mark Zuckerberg. If people aren’t questioning the veracity of the film’s storyline, they’re speculating about it. Is it fact, fiction or just a dramatic, narrative account pumped up with a little extra Hollywood juice?

Controversy erupted months in advance of the release of the Aaron Sorkin and David Fincher film. Zuckerberg has publicly dismissed the film and the book it’s based on as works of fiction and has said he has no plans to see the movie. That’s certainly less extreme than William Randolph Hearst‘s alleged attempt to halt the distribution of Orson Wells’ Citizen Kane to curtail viewing of that “biographical” film — but it’s not much of an endorsement, either.

Of course, not all the folks at Facebook are happy with the depiction of their founder as a conflicted, ambiguous, untrustworthy visionary. The film portrays a character desperately trying to fit in with his Harvard surroundings, but lacking the social skills to do so. His coping mechanism is to develop a tool that enables him to interact with others at a distance and which now encompasses more than 500 million enthusiastic members.

Whether fact, fiction or a combination of the two, this film is a “must-see” for entrepreneurs — if for no other reason than the volatile emergence of Facebook is the story of every person with entrepreneurial ambition. This holds especially true for those of us who choose a level of personal, professional or financial risk in order to pursue an opportunity or a concept. That’s just what an entrepreneur does.
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The Social Network: The Crisis Of The Male Ego

A girl cut down Mark Zuckerberg’s ego and Facebook was the result. We’re not talking about the real Zuckerberg, but the fictionalized character in David Fincher’s new, masterful little film The Social Network.

In it we meet Zuckerberg (played by Jesse Eisenberg) as he embarks in a verbal tête-à-tête with his current girlfriend Erica Albright (the soon-to-be Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, Rooney Mara). It’s actually more of a one-way conversation with Zuckerberg tearing into Albright with aggressive inquiries and sly insults. He dominates her with a flurry of verbiage, before she reverses the cards and drops the A-bomb on him. He’s an asshole and she wants him to know it, before dumping him for good.

Bruised ego in tact, Zuckerberg takes refuge in his dorm room where he acts out aggressively against the female gender as a whole. He hacks into Harvard, gathers photos of every girl on campus and creates a website where guys can peruse and rank who is the hottest. This is not Facebook but Facemash, a precursor to what Zuckerberg will eventually make billions on.
Voyeurism online

Key to Mark Zuckerberg’s revenge is the whole idea of voyeurism. Facemash was a classic form of male dominance, where men watch unaware women for fetishistic, visual pleasure. It’s the kind of thing that feminist film theorist Laura Mulvey discussed in her article Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema. The male viewer objectifies the female with his gaze and simultaneously declares his own subjectivity.

Facebook, as we know it, enables this sort of voyeurism, this boost to the male ego and it seems perfect that director David Fincher would helm the movie on the subject. The male ego and voyeurism are themes Fincher has explored throughout his films, particularly in Fight Club and his underrated masterpiece Zodiac.
The male ego in Fincher’s films

Both Fight Club and Zodiac feature emasculated men who act out aggressively to assert their male egos.

In the former film, Edward Norton’s character — we’ll call him Jack — is an effeminate male whose dick is trapped in a box by unbridled consumerism. He practically lives in an IKEA catalog with Starbucks in hand. Jack finds masculine release in Tyler Durden, projecting himself onto this ripped, sexy, carnal uber-male embodied by Brad Pitt. This masculine ego, Tyler, asserts itself aggressively through Fight Club, where men beat each other silly and turn into saboteurs.

Zodiac is far subtler in its exploration of the masculine ego. One reason for this is because we know so little about the actual Zodiac killer. But from what we do know, the killer’s bruised ego is evident. The Zodiac’s initial victims were couples, and in each case the male survives because the killer was far more focused on hacking away at the women. That’s male aggression asserting itself by punishing the female sex.

When we learn about the prime suspect, Arthur Leigh Allen (John Carroll Lynch), he comes across as an emasculated man despite his hulking figure. He has an effeminate speech, crosses his legs prettily and we find out that he wasn’t very popular with the ladies.

Like Mark Zuckerberg who acts out on his bruised ego by putting women online, Jack turns to Tyler and Fight Club while Arthur Leigh Allen resorts to putting women in body bags.

More on the crisis of the male ego in David Fincher films after the jump…


Watch and listen to the finest Facebook-inspired pop song in the world. At least she expressed it vocally instead of on her “wall.”

A girl cut down Mark Zuckerberg’s ego and Facebook was the result. We’re not talking about the real Zuckerberg, but the fictionalized character in David Fincher’s new, masterful little film The Social Network.

In it we meet Zuckerberg (played by Jesse Eisenberg) as he embarks in a verbal tête-à-tête with his current girlfriend Erica Albright (the soon-to-be Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, Rooney Mara). It’s actually more of a one-way conversation with Zuckerberg tearing into Albright with aggressive inquiries and sly insults. He dominates her with a flurry of verbiage, before she reverses the cards and drops the A-bomb on him. He’s an asshole and she wants him to know it, before dumping him for good.

Bruised ego in tact, Zuckerberg takes refuge in his dorm room where he acts out aggressively against the female gender as a whole. He hacks into Harvard, gathers photos of every girl on campus and creates a website where guys can peruse and rank who is the hottest. This is not Facebook but Facemash, a precursor to what Zuckerberg will eventually make billions on.

Voyeurism online

Key to Mark Zuckerberg’s revenge is the whole idea of voyeurism. Facemash was a classic form of male dominance, where men watch unaware women for fetishistic, visual pleasure. It’s the kind of thing that feminist film theorist Laura Mulvey discussed in her article Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema. The male viewer objectifies the female with his gaze and simultaneously declares his own subjectivity.

Facebook, as we know it, enables this sort of voyeurism, this boost to the male ego and it seems perfect that director David Fincher would helm the movie on the subject. The male ego and voyeurism are themes Fincher has explored throughout his films, particularly in Fight Club and his underrated masterpiece Zodiac.

The male ego in Fincher’s films

Both Fight Club and Zodiac feature emasculated men who act out aggressively to assert their male egos.

In the former film, Edward Norton’s character — we’ll call him Jack — is an effeminate male whose dick is trapped in a box by unbridled consumerism. He practically lives in an IKEA catalog with Starbucks in hand. Jack finds masculine release in Tyler Durden, projecting himself onto this ripped, sexy, carnal uber-male embodied by Brad Pitt. This masculine ego, Tyler, asserts itself aggressively through Fight Club, where men beat each other silly and turn into saboteurs.

Zodiac is far subtler in its exploration of the masculine ego. One reason for this is because we know so little about the actual Zodiac killer. But from what we do know, the killer’s bruised ego is evident. The Zodiac’s initial victims were couples, and in each case the male survives because the killer was far more focused on hacking away at the women. That’s male aggression asserting itself by punishing the female sex.

When we learn about the prime suspect, Arthur Leigh Allen (John Carroll Lynch), he comes across as an emasculated man despite his hulking figure. He has an effeminate speech, crosses his legs prettily and we find out that he wasn’t very popular with the ladies.

Like Mark Zuckerberg who acts out on his bruised ego by putting women online, Jack turns to Tyler and Fight Club while Arthur Leigh Allen resorts to putting women in body bags.

More on the crisis of the male ego in David Fincher films after the jump…

Leer más “The Social Network: The Crisis Of The Male Ego”