Web Designing from Evolution to Revolution [Infographic]


Via inspiredm.com
Here’s a nice infographic I came across today, released by Brush Lovers, fine curators of quality photoshop brushes, styles and patterns.

The term “web design” implies a great range of activities such as website planning, website creation, modeling, matching the right elements (fonts, banners, etc), coding, and arranging all pages in such a way that the end result will be a user-friendly and easy-to-use site. This infographic follows the journey of webdesign from its inception to the present days. Enjoy!

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Infographics: How to Strike the Elusive Balance between Data and Visualization

They started out as a social media experiment and then suddenly everyone wanted a piece.

A couple years back, if you dropped the word ‘Infographic’ or ‘Dataviz’ in a conversation, you would have been greeted by a good number of confused looks even if you were among other web designers.

Today, so many infographics have gone viral that it’s practically impossible to ignore them. You’ll find them tweeted by your friends who want to share an interesting new find, promoted by companies eager to display their growth trends and utilized by even the White House for its progress reports.

No matter what you are searching for online, whether employment statistics or endangered animals, you are sure to find an infographic for it. If you, miraculously, aren’t able to recall any that you have seen, take a look at this list of the 10 best infographics of 2011 via Nowsourcing to catch up.
Infographics spice up ‘boring’ data

Infographics are useful because they turn historically lengthy and tedious bulks of data in to something that’s much more interesting: a visual.

As a society heading into the new decade, we want to read less and see more. While this doesn’t bode too well for book publishers, it’s opened a whole new creative area for designers.

An increasing number of companies and clients are recognizing the benefits of infographics and want their data jazzed up and dressed for the prom. They know that their assiduously compiled information has a far better chance of being read, appreciated, shared and widely circulated if it looks less like an annual report and more like the next big meme. And if you aren’t convinced yet, here’s an infographic on why you should use infographics.
You will need your existing skills. And more.

While the graphics used in infographics have become more eye-catching and sophisticated, they are not too different in purpose from the charts and graphs we used to make in high school. After all, the objective is still to present data in a more visually engaging and accessible way.

However, print and web designers are having a hard time transferring their existing skills to infographics because, as the many aspiring infographics designers will tell you, designing good infographics isn’t as simple as it looks. Sure, you still need the same essential aesthetic and technical skills but you should also be able to effectively translate data into visuals. Most importantly, you need to ensure that the infographic acts as an informative tool and not as a visual distraction.
The 7 rules of great infographic design…


They started out as a social media experiment and then suddenly everyone wanted a piece.

A couple years back, if you dropped the word ‘Infographic’ or ‘Dataviz’ in a conversation, you would have been greeted by a good number of confused looks even if you were among other web designers.

Today, so many infographics have gone viral that it’s practically impossible to ignore them. You’ll find them tweeted by your friends who want to share an interesting new find, promoted by companies eager to display their growth trends and utilized by even the White House for its progress reports.

No matter what you are searching for online, whether employment statistics or endangered animals, you are sure to find an infographic for it. If you, miraculously, aren’t able to recall any that you have seen, take a look at this list of the 10 best infographics of 2011 via Nowsourcing to catch up.

Infographics spice up ‘boring’ data

Infographics are useful because they turn historically lengthy and tedious bulks of data in to something that’s much more interesting: a visual.

As a society heading into the new decade, we want to read less and see more. While this doesn’t bode too well for book publishers, it’s opened a whole new creative area for designers.

An increasing number of companies and clients are recognizing the benefits of infographics and want their data jazzed up and dressed for the prom. They know that their assiduously compiled information has a far better chance of being read, appreciated, shared and widely circulated if it looks less like an annual report and more like the next big meme. And if you aren’t convinced yet, here’s an infographic on why you should use infographics.

You will need your existing skills. And more.

While the graphics used in infographics have become more eye-catching and sophisticated, they are not too different in purpose from the charts and graphs we used to make in high school. After all, the objective is still to present data in a more visually engaging and accessible way.

However, print and web designers are having a hard time transferring their existing skills to infographics because, as the many aspiring infographics designers will tell you, designing good infographics isn’t as simple as it looks. Sure, you still need the same essential aesthetic and technical skills but you should also be able to effectively translate data into visuals. Most importantly, you need to ensure that the infographic acts as an informative tool and not as a visual distraction. Leer más “Infographics: How to Strike the Elusive Balance between Data and Visualization”

Bits Pics: Visualizing the Web’s Icons

The data visualization above shows the “favicons” of nearly 300,000 Web sites on the Internet. Favicons are small images used to identify a Web site in the browser.

The sizes of the icons are based on the amount of traffic each Web site receives, using data from Alexa.com, a traffic and Web metrics site.

The project, which I came across via Gizmodo, is the work of two programmers, David Fifield and Brandon Enright. They work for a company called Nmap that makes open-source security programs.


By NICK BILTON

Favicon Data visualization

The data visualization above shows the “favicons” of nearly 300,000 Web sites on the Internet. Favicons are small images used to identify a Web site in the browser.

The sizes of the icons are based on the amount of traffic each Web site receives, using data from Alexa.com, a traffic and Web metrics site.

The project, which I came across via Gizmodo, is the work of two programmers, David Fifield and Brandon Enright. They work for a company called Nmap that makes open-source security programs. Leer más “Bits Pics: Visualizing the Web’s Icons”

Using Charts and Graphs for Content

As a designer, have you ever had to work on a project such as an annual report, brochure or even a blog post that contained a lot of data?

Many designers are handed documents which contain tables of snore-inducing information with the expectation that they shine it up a bit—something akin to Extreme Makeover: Data Edition. The solution is to visualize this information in an attractive format by employing charts and graphs.

Some people may be under the impression that charts are just as boring as tabular data, but just like anything, charts can be designed with tact and taste.

In this article, I’ll be talking about when to use a chart, what kinds of charts are out there, the design elements of a chart, how to gather data for a chart, and how to create a chart.


Using Charts and Graphs for Content

As a designer, have you ever had to work on a project such as an annual report, brochure or even a blog post that contained a lot of data?

Many designers are handed documents which contain tables of snore-inducing information with the expectation that they shine it up a bit—something akin to Extreme Makeover: Data Edition. The solution is to visualize this information in an attractive format by employing charts and graphs.

Some people may be under the impression that charts are just as boring as tabular data, but just like anything, charts can be designed with tact and taste.

In this article, I’ll be talking about when to use a chart, what kinds of charts are out there, the design elements of a chart, how to gather data for a chart, and how to create a chart. Leer más “Using Charts and Graphs for Content”

Information Architecture: Enhancing the User Experience

Defined as ‘the structural design of shared information environments’, information architecture focuses on bringing the principles of architectural design to the online world.

Just like the blueprints of a dream home or the outline of a well-written article, good website structure organizes information in a way that enhances the user experience and delivers pertinent information as quickly as possible.

In fact, most website visitors only become aware of information architecture when it is poor and stops them from finding the information they require.

Read on for more details and a case study. As usual, you can leave us your feedback at the end of the post…


Defined as ‘the structural design of shared information environments’, information architecture focuses on bringing the principles of architectural design to the online world.

Just like the blueprints of a dream home or the outline of a well-written article, good website structure organizes information in a way that enhances the user experience and delivers pertinent information as quickly as possible.

In fact, most website visitors only become aware of information architecture when it is poor and stops them from finding the information they require.

Read on for more details and a case study. As usual, you can leave us your feedback at the end of the post…

Data Visualization Tool: Mondrian


I just found this amazing free tool that can do some smart data visualization with the simplest sets of data comparing to other visualization tools. You can just import basic excel files or even txt files with huge chunk of data and it will categorize and visualize them.

Graphics and interface might not be as sexy as what you see on informationisbeautiful, but it can definitely help you understand the relationships between groups of numbers. It generates basic bar graphs as well as graphs like below.

Download it and play around with their sample data, you will see what I mean.

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