Social Media Promotion: It’s About ‘Stickiness’

Posted by Darko Johnson

We all know that content is the most important thing when it comes down to having a REALLY successful viral campaign. Sure, you’ll need some promotion to help with the initial push of the campaign but as your campaign gets more popular, you’ll notice the increasing power of content to retain your readers, users and buyers. How do we classify what content works versus that which doesn’t? Well, according to Dan Heath in his book Made to Stick, it’s all about stickiness.

Personally, I’m shocked by the amount of garbage advice on social media, the self-proclaimed ‘social media gurus’ who have virtually n0 experience in getting viral on some social media/bookmarking website (Facebook, Twitter, Delicious, Digg, StumbleUpon). As for me, I’ve been featured on many of those sites so I I must be doing something right, no 🙂

What’s stickiness? In his book, Made to Stick, Dan Heath describes several principles that make ideas spread and ‘stick’ to peoples’ minds. I found it amazing how powerful those principles were and yet, nobody bothered to translate them into the online world and see how they can be applied . I’ll try to do that here; some of the most important principles there are…


Posted by Darko Johnson

We all know that content is the most important thing when it comes down to having a REALLY successful viral campaign. Sure, you’ll need some promotion to help with the initial push of the campaign but as your campaign gets more popular, you’ll notice the increasing power of content to retain your readers, users and buyers.  How do we classify what content works versus that which doesn’t?  Well, according to Dan Heath in his book Made to Stick, it’s all about stickiness.

Personally, I’m shocked by the amount of garbage advice on social media, the self-proclaimed ‘social media gurus’ who have virtually n0 experience in getting viral on some social media/bookmarking website (Facebook, Twitter, Delicious, Digg, StumbleUpon). As for me, I’ve been featured on many of those sites so I I must be doing something right, no :)

What’s stickiness? In his book, Made to Stick, Dan Heath describes several principles that make ideas spread and ‘stick’ to peoples’ minds. I found it amazing how powerful those principles were and yet, nobody bothered to translate them into the online world and see how they can be applied . I’ll try to do that here; some of the most important principles there are… Leer más “Social Media Promotion: It’s About ‘Stickiness’”

Team Coordination Is Key in Businesses

By: Dan Heath and Chip Heath
147-next-46-strategy-MadeToStick-1

Photograph by AFP/Getty Images
Dan Heath and Chip Heath explain why we tend to neglect coordination — and suggest how to fix it.

At the 2008 Beijing Olympics, the American men’s 4×100 relay team was a strong medal contender. During the four previous Games, the American men had medaled every time. The qualifying heats in 2008 — the first step on the road to gold — should have been a cakewalk.

On the third leg of the race, the U.S.A.’s Darvis Patton was running neck and neck with a runner from Trinidad and Tobago. Patton rounded the final turn, approaching anchorman Tyson Gay, who was picking up speed to match Patton. Patton extended the baton, Gay reached back, and the baton hit his palm.

Then, somehow, it fell. The team was disqualified. It was a humiliating early defeat. Stranger still, about a half-hour later, the U.S.A. women’s team was disqualified too — for a baton drop at the same point in the race. (Freaked out by the trend, the U.S.A.’s rhythmic gymnasts kept an extra-tight grip on their ribbons.)


By: Dan Heath and Chip Heath

147-next-46-strategy-MadeToStick-1Photograph by AFP/Getty Images

Dan Heath and Chip Heath explain why we tend to neglect coordination — and suggest how to fix it.

At the 2008 Beijing Olympics, the American men’s 4×100 relay team was a strong medal contender. During the four previous Games, the American men had medaled every time. The qualifying heats in 2008 — the first step on the road to gold — should have been a cakewalk.

On the third leg of the race, the U.S.A.‘s Darvis Patton was running neck and neck with a runner from Trinidad and Tobago. Patton rounded the final turn, approaching anchorman Tyson Gay, who was picking up speed to match Patton. Patton extended the baton, Gay reached back, and the baton hit his palm.

Then, somehow, it fell. The team was disqualified. It was a humiliating early defeat. Stranger still, about a half-hour later, the U.S.A. women’s team was disqualified too — for a baton drop at the same point in the race. (Freaked out by the trend, the U.S.A.’s rhythmic gymnasts kept an extra-tight grip on their ribbons.) Leer más “Team Coordination Is Key in Businesses”