7 Inspiring Interviews That Every Web Designer/Developer Should Read


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Written by:  Rean John Uehara

It’s already August and the year is about to draw to a close…how are you doing with your work and projects? I know that inspiration is quite often hard to come by, and with our line of work inspiration is mainly the driving force. To give you a boost, why not read these 7 inspiring interviews by famous bloggers, web designers, and web developers, who have garnered success in their fields?

Are you ready to be inspired?!

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7 Inspiring Interviews

Four of the interviews below actually focus on how their design blogs became a huge success. These blogs they have started simply as pet projects to teach other people about their passion: web design and web development. In the end, they managed to not only fulfill their wants, but they also managed to create entire communities for designers and developers by providing useful resources. This is one of the reasons why I once asked, Hey Web Designers and Web Developers, Are You Blogging Yet?

The following interviews will redirect to Founder Tips (except #1), 1WD’s sister website where we publish interviews and success stories of people.

Ready to be inspired? Go!

1. An Interview With Chris Coyier – Founder of CSS-Tricks Leer más “7 Inspiring Interviews That Every Web Designer/Developer Should Read”

Five Useful Design Techniques and Coding Solutions For Web Designers

As designers, we have to create an intuitive user experience, solve design problems and provide a beautiful and functional user interfaces. Unlike print design, we don’t have the luxury of designing in a static area; rather, our canvas is ever-changing in its content, browser width, page length and more. We do need to be able to code to some extent and be able to build a design around a structure of code. Yet, with these complications comes an opportunity for unique functionality, interactive effects and better user experience.

In this article, we’ll look at five useful coding solutions that we’ve stumble upon recently. All of these solutions enhance a website’s design, not just the code. These solutions affect the user interface and the user’s interaction with the design, and they can make for a more usable and interactive website.
1. Bar Graph Effect For Multiple Items

This effect (pictured below) can be a great way to add some oomph to a Web page, and make it more user-friendly. Its functionality goes beyond just being a cool trick, though. By organizing any set of items on a page — such as tags, categories, comments, product count — a designer can enhance user interaction, provide useful content clues and improve usability. By seeing a count of items such as tags and product types, the visitor can quickly get an idea of what the website mostly consists of. This is a great way to make quick connections with targeted visitors.

For comment counts, visitors can quickly see where the discussions are at. Highlights on highly commented posts can reinforce user-to-user interaction.

Pictured below are two examples of this design. The left organizes tags, and the second ranks the most commented posts on a blog. Be sure to visit both websites to see the full functionality and CSS effects.


By Kayla Knight
Full article
http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/10/07/5-useful-coding-solutions-for-web-designers/

As designers, we have to create an intuitive user experience, solve design problems and provide a beautiful and functional user interfaces. Unlike print design, we don’t have the luxury of designing in a static area; rather, our canvas is ever-changing in its content, browser width, page length and more. We do need to be able to code to some extent and be able to build a design around a structure of code. Yet, with these complications comes an opportunity for unique functionality, interactive effects and better user experience.

In this article, we’ll look at five useful coding solutions that we’ve stumble upon recently. All of these solutions enhance a website’s design, not just the code. These solutions affect the user interface and the user’s interaction with the design, and they can make for a more usable and interactive website.

1. Bar Graph Effect For Multiple Items

This effect (pictured below) can be a great way to add some oomph to a Web page, and make it more user-friendly. Its functionality goes beyond just being a cool trick, though. By organizing any set of items on a page — such as tags, categories, comments, product count — a designer can enhance user interaction, provide useful content clues and improve usability. By seeing a count of items such as tags and product types, the visitor can quickly get an idea of what the website mostly consists of. This is a great way to make quick connections with targeted visitors.

For comment counts, visitors can quickly see where the discussions are at. Highlights on highly commented posts can reinforce user-to-user interaction.

Pictured below are two examples of this design. The left organizes tags, and the second ranks the most commented posts on a blog. Be sure to visit both websites to see the full functionality and CSS effects. Leer más “Five Useful Design Techniques and Coding Solutions For Web Designers”

HOW TO: Score a Design Job

Without designers there probably wouldn’t be an Internet, or at least there wouldn’t be an Internet that looked this good. Many skilled hands go into creating the websites that we know and love, but designers are usually the ones held responsible for how it looks. They put together everything from flashy logos to image banners to drop downs and font choice.

Twitter (Twitter)’s Fail Whale or Facebook (Facebook)’s distinctive blue and white color scheme both came from designers, but someone needed to find and hire those designers in the first place.

Getting a job is usually a daunting experience regardless of the field. It can be all the more intimidating for creative types that must submit their portfolios for critique. To help, we spoke with three seasoned designers that have gone through the job process with great success. They helped us with resume tips, cover letter advice, and whether to actually print out that portfolio. Read on for their tips and a selection of current job openings for designers.


Zachary Sniderman

mathers fishing imageWithout designers there probably wouldn’t be an Internet, or at least there wouldn’t be an Internet that looked this good. Many skilled hands go into creating the websites that we know and love, but designers are usually the ones held responsible for how it looks. They put together everything from flashy logos to image banners to drop downs and font choice.

Twitter (Twitter)’s Fail Whale or Facebook (Facebook)’s distinctive blue and white color scheme both came from designers, but someone needed to find and hire those designers in the first place.

Getting a job is usually a daunting experience regardless of the field. It can be all the more intimidating for creative types that must submit their portfolios for critique. To help, we spoke with three seasoned designers that have gone through the job process with great success. They helped us with resume tips, cover letter advice, and whether to actually print out that portfolio. Read on for their tips and a selection of current job openings for designers.


Don’t “Over Design”


mathers image

Perhaps one of the biggest questions for a designer is how much to gussy-up their application. You are a designer after all, shouldn’t you “design” your materials? The answer is: Sort of.

It’s always nice to present something that is visually appealing, but remember that your employer will probably value legibility and clarity over a bunch of fancy doodles. “I’m more a supporter of simplicity, especially when it comes to a resume, where it is important for it be as clear, straight forward, and comprehensible as possible,” said Alex Mathers, a graphic designer, illustrator and author. It can hint at your skills and abilities but shouldn’t detract from conveying the important information. Leer más “HOW TO: Score a Design Job”