Crowdsourcing creativo o la democratización del talento | Juan Ramón Moreno | Marketing Comunidad

Por otra parte, aquellos que demandan trabajos creativos también son conscientes de estos cambios y quieren experimentarlos. De hecho, son cada vez más las organizaciones que, independientemente de su tamaño, recurren al crowdsourcing creativo como parte de su estrategia. Por ejemplo, Doritos lo ha empleado por segundo año consecutivo para realizar el spot que se ha emitido en la Super Bowl de 2012, otorgando cinco premios de 25.000 dólares a los cinco finalistas seleccionados. También Procter & Gamble, Heinz y General Motors, entre otras compañías, ya están usando este modelo de trabajo obteniendo magníficos resultados.

Las ventajas del crowdsourcing creativo favorecen tanto a las empresas como a la comunidad de profesionales. Por un lado, este modelo de negocio contribuye a la democratización del talento. Cualquier compañía puede obtener una nueva identidad, un vídeo corporativo, un spot de televisión, un guión…ajustando la demanda a sus necesidades económicas. Por otra parte, para las agencias es un nuevo método de externalizar determinados servicios y para los profesionales supone una novedosa fuente de generación de empleo. Además, a través de plataformas de crowdsourcing los creativos pueden acceder a miles de empresas y pymes a las que, de otro modo no podrían llegar, lo que les ayuda a intensificar sus relaciones comerciales.

Anuncios

Via Scoop.ithuman being in – perfección

El crowdsourcing es un fenómeno relativamente reciente en nuestro país, que tiene su origen en Estados Unidos, y que cada vez cobra más presencia en Internet. Este término, acuñado por Jeff Howe, escritor y editor de la revista “Wired”, surgió como una forma de externalizar trabajos y de aprovechar las mejores ideas de un colectivo a través de Internet, pero gracias a su éxito se ha transformado en un modelo de negocio en el que ya confían muchas empresas de diferentes sectores de actividad. Leer más “Crowdsourcing creativo o la democratización del talento | Juan Ramón Moreno | Marketing Comunidad”

New fashion campaign lets users decide what’s sold

We’ve seen crowdsourcing and voting campaigns done before in the fashion world, often to great effect but fashion site brandalley.co.uk has taken that a step further by allowing their users to decide which designs actually get commissioned and sold on the site. Their new fashion site was previewed late last year and has now gone live to the public. The campaign takes place in a section of the site called ‘Le Lab and the concept is fairly simple. The latest creations are showcased on the site and public votes allow you to see which designs/designers have received the most votes. The designs that gather 2000 votes are sent forward for consideration by Brand Alley, to go through to an actual launch :


 

We’ve seen crowdsourcing and voting campaigns done before in the fashion world, often to great effect but fashion site brandalley.co.uk has taken that a step further by allowing their users to decide which designs actually get commissioned and sold on the site. Their new fashion site was previewed late last year and has now gone live to the public. The campaign takes place in a section of the site called ‘Le Lab and the concept is fairly simple. The latest creations are showcased on the site and public votes allow you to see which designs/designers have received the most votes. The designs that gather 2000 votes are sent forward for consideration by Brand Alley, to go through to an actual launch :

Leer más “New fashion campaign lets users decide what’s sold”

Looking Beyond the Breakthrough Idea

While adopting crowdsourcing for innovation certainly can lead to breakthrough ideas, solutions and crowd efforts, I believe there is too much focus on the breakthrough and not enough value assigned to the many other benefits of engaging your stakeholders using crowdsoucing methods. In fact, even if a breakthrough is unlikely, there are still ample reasons to begin crowdsourcing. Here are a few:

Seed concepts: If you are looking for that next great idea or solution, crowdsourcing will help you get there even if the crowd itself doesn’t come up with it directly. The crowd will definitely spur your thinking, get you out of your rut, and perhaps plant the seed of a new idea or concept that will blossom into the breakthrough idea you are seeking.

Market validation: All companies have hunches – but often don’t have the proof of whether their hunches are right or not. At a bare minimum, crowdsourcing will confirm some of the hunches you have, and even better, help you refine your hunches into market proven data points. Or it will warn you that your hunch is wrong and prevent a potentially costly mistake.


Randy Corke
http://www.chaordix.com/blog/2010/11/24/looking-beyond-the-breakthrough-idea/

While adopting crowdsourcing for innovation certainly can lead to breakthrough ideas, solutions and crowd efforts, I believe there is too much focus on the breakthrough and not enough value assigned to the many other benefits of engaging your stakeholders using crowdsoucing methods. In fact, even if a breakthrough is unlikely, there are still ample reasons to begin crowdsourcing. Here are a few:

Seed concepts: If you are looking for that next great idea or solution, crowdsourcing will help you get there even if the crowd itself doesn’t come up with it directly. The crowd will definitely spur your thinking, get you out of your rut, and perhaps plant the seed of a new idea or concept that will blossom into the breakthrough idea you are seeking.

Market validation: All companies have hunches – but often don’t have the proof of whether their hunches are right or not. At a bare minimum, crowdsourcing will confirm some of the hunches you have, and even better, help you refine your hunches into market proven data points. Or it will warn you that your hunch is wrong and prevent a potentially costly mistake. Leer más “Looking Beyond the Breakthrough Idea”

The crowdsourcing dilemma: the idea with the most votes isn’t always the best idea

You might wonder, with great anti-biasing technology, why wouldn’t the idea with the most votes always be the best idea? There are all sorts of reasons: a great idea might have been entered relatively late in the crowdsourcing process or the submitter might have given it a non-compelling title, for example. But by looking at implicit data, as well as explicit data, (that is looking at how the crowd interacts with ideas and not just at the hard data like votes), you can identify other indicators for ideas that are truly merit worthy, despite not getting the most votes, or even a lot of votes. You may not be able to immediately tell if the “underdog” idea is in fact a better idea, but you can provide it with more visibility within the crowd so that you can do an apples-to-apples comparison with the big vote getting ideas.

Here are some of the things we do, and suggest others do, to ensure a reliable, accurate outcome, and avoid the “popularity contest” syndrome:

* Multiple idea order display – Display ideas in a variety of ways, such as most recent, most discussed and most active for example, and don’t just default to listing the top voted ideas.
* Zero-start finalist round – Use a finalist round to allow the entire crowd to focus on just a few ideas which all show signs of being superior ideas, and start all finalists at zero votes.
* Weighted voting – give insider experts, your panel, or more long-time active members more vote weight… you’ll find these people are highly motivated to filter the best not just the popular to the top


Randy Corke| http://www.chaordix.com/blog

One of the common complaints about crowdsourcing is that it can become a popularity contest: the idea that gets the most early votes rises to the top of the list, therefore gets more views, and therefore more votes and becomes the winner. And, unfortunately, for many so-called “crowdsourcing” sites, this is true. You see it on sites like Digg – get enough early “diggs” for your submission to get on the “top news” list and your submission can get visibility for a long time.

We work hard to surface the best quality results for our clients from their crowdsourcing projects, so as you would expect, we have developed ways to avoid this “early vote” bias and other forms of bias. But even with great design and planning, the best technology and the right methodology, you can’t completely eliminate the possibility of a less-worthy idea getting the most votes. However, it IS possible to use analysis and crowd management techniques to ensure that other highly worthy ideas can be identified, so that the chances of truly finding the best idea are maximized.

Leer más “The crowdsourcing dilemma: the idea with the most votes isn’t always the best idea”

Making sense of crowdsourced data

Turns out crowdsourcing has a lot in common with information governance.

This week at a beautiful desert oasis in New Mexico, Chaordix participated on IBM’s Data Governance Council Forum to work on strengthening and modernizing the Maturity Model that sets out best practices for information governance that distinguish leading organizations. Among an elite of IT, governance and finance professionals for some of the world’s largest organizations in health, banking, utility sector and the US Army, I began feeling an outsider to the scope and scale of information management challenges that these organizations face.

But when asked what they wanted to talk about, it turned out their top 3 interests were the same as top concerns enterprises have about data that is…crowdsourced!


Claudia Moore | http://www.chaordix.com

Is it true? Do I understand it? Is it data I can apply to perform better, right now?

Turns out crowdsourcing has a lot in common with information governance.

This week at a beautiful desert oasis in New Mexico, Chaordix participated on IBM’s Data Governance Council Forum to work on strengthening and modernizing the Maturity Model that sets out best practices for information governance that distinguish leading organizations. Among an elite of IT, governance and finance professionals for some of the world’s largest organizations in health, banking, utility sector and the US Army, I began feeling an outsider to the scope and scale of information management challenges that these organizations face.

But when asked what they wanted to talk about, it turned out their top 3 interests were the same as top concerns enterprises have about data that is…crowdsourced! Leer más “Making sense of crowdsourced data”

What is Open Innovation? | Crowdsourcing? | User innovation? | Co-Creation?

What is co-creation? Here Wikipedia states that co-creation views markets as forums for firms and active customers to share, combine and renew each other’s resources and capabilities to create value through new forms of interaction, service and learning mechanisms. It differs from the traditional active firm – passive consumer market construct of the past. I like how C.K. Prahalad and Venkat Ramaswamy argue that “value will be increasingly co-created by the firm and the customer, they argued, rather than being created entirely inside the firm.”

These terms overlap which leaves plenty of room for confusion, but I hope this short overview helps.


By Stefan Lindegaard

Many people ask what open innovation is. I suggest that you should view open innovation as a philosophy or a mindset that you should embrace within your organization. In a more practical definition, open innovation is about bridging internal and external resources and act on those opportunities. The value proposition this gives companies that get it right is simply too good to miss out on.

I also like this quote from Henry Chesbrough; “Open innovation is a paradigm that assumes that firms can and should use external ideas as well as internal ideas, and internal and external paths to market, as the firms look to advance their technology

This still leaves three other questions:

What is crowdsourcing? Wikipedia states that “crowdsourcing is the act of outsourcing tasks, traditionally performed by an employee or contractor, to a large group of people or community (a crowd), through an open call.” I view crowdsourcing as a tool that can be used to bring external input into your organizations.

What is user-driven innovation? I view this as a technique in which companies gain insights from users, which can then be used in the innovation process. I think that a key element in user-driven innovation is the observation of users rather than the use of questionnaires and focus groups. Erich von Hippel is an important influencer with his contributions on lead-user innovation. Leer más “What is Open Innovation? | Crowdsourcing? | User innovation? | Co-Creation?”