Mobile Marketing Isn’t About Devices, It’s About Behavior – thnxz to @annabager


Vía adage.com

Marketers can’t remember this often enough: Mobile is not one screen or two screens. Or three screens (smartphone, tablet, and e-reader). Or four (ultrabook). Or five (phablet). Or six (fill in the blank with whatever connected device consumers will be flocking to next.)

Google Glass? The Apple iWatch? Mobile is a behavior. The only common thread uniting the vast and diverse mobile arena is that consumers are taking a connected device with them on the go. 

By: Anna Bager

(Abstract…)

Some of the most forward-thinking creatives and mobile leaders have begun to answer these questions, creating campaigns and products that demonstrate “liquid creativity,” mobile creative that flows like a liquid across devices and fits flexibly into the distinct opportunities each has available. IAB is featuring these people and their accomplishments  at our June 18 session at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity entitled “Liquid Creativity: Secrets of the Mobile Superstars.”

(…) Full article? + INFO

Responsive design often comes up as an answer to liquid creativity. This is the idea that a web server can recognize the device in which it is supposed to render content, and make adjustments for qualities like screen size. But do we trust computers to make decisions about ad content? Do marketers still want to approve each permutation of an ad? Responsive design can disrupt long-held norms of digital advertising.

(…)

Flexibility is an pportunity. Marketers need to approach mobile not by device, but by their individual objectives. Select the ideal combination of right time, right environment and right consumer, and then incorporate whichever device or devices best serve the intention.

(…) Full article? + INFO

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Anna Bager is Vice President and General Manager, Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence, IAB (Interactive Advertising Bureau).

Top Six Components of a Creative Climate | innovationmanagement.se


 

Are you thinking about ways to transform your workplace into an environment more conducive to innovation? This article takes a closer look at six components of creative climates that have shown to be significant at facilitating creativity according to new research.

This article will continue investigating creative climates with the goal of identifying the most substantial components that facilitates creativity.

What is a creative climate?

A climate can be seen as various aspects of the psychological atmosphere in a team and the surrounding organizational environment. The climate often conveys expectations about which behaviors and attitudes that are acceptable. In the creativity research field there has been many attempts to conceptualize the idea of a ‘creative’ climate – i.e. such a climate that facilitates outcomes that are creative. Examples of such conceptualizations are the Team Climate Inventory by Anderson & West (1996), the Creative Climate Questionnaire by Ekvall (1996) and the KEYS by Amabile et al. (1996).

Many components of a creative climate have been proposed during the years. Some examples are the degree of individual freedom, psychological safety, support and positive relationships among team members, vision provided by supervisors, creative encouragement, mission clarity, available resources, and even joy (Denti, 2011).

The search for significant components of a creative climate

For this article I want to highlight six components of a creative climate that have been shown to be among the most salient in predicting creative and innovative outcomes. To identify these components, I have scrutinized two recent meta-analytic studies on factors that influence creativity and innovation (Hülsheger, Anderson & Salgado, 2009, and Hunter, Bedell & Mumford, 2007). Meta analytic studies have the best ability to detect effects across multiple settings since they combine the results from a large amount of studies¹. The factors are presented in no particular order…   Leer más “Top Six Components of a Creative Climate | innovationmanagement.se”

The Bias Against Creatives as Leaders | 99u.com


 

Illustration: Oscar Ramos Orozco

Two candidates are being interviewed for a leadership position in your company. Both have strong resumes, but while one seems to be bursting with new and daring ideas, the other comes across as decidedly less creative (though clearly still a smart cookie). Who gets the job?

The answer, unfortunately, is usually the less creative candidate. This fact may or may not surprise you – you yourself may have been the creative candidate who got the shaft. But what you’re probably wondering is, why?

by Heidi Grant Halvorson

After all, it’s quite clear who should be getting the job. Studies show that leaders who are more creative are in fact better able to effect positive change in their organizations, and are better at inspiring others to follow their lead.

And yet, according to recent research there is good reason to believe that the people with the most creativity aren’t given the opportunity to lead, because of a process that occurs (on a completely unconscious level) in the mind of everyone who has ever evaluated an applicant for a leadership position.

The problem, put simply, is this: our idea of what a prototypical “creative person” is like is completely at odds with our idea of a prototypical “effective leader.”  Leer más “The Bias Against Creatives as Leaders | 99u.com”

Picasso, Kepler, and the Benefits of Being an Expert Generalist


 

by Art Markman
99u.com

Illustration: Oscar Ramos Orozco

One thing that separates the great innovators from everyone else is that they seem to know a lot about a wide variety of topics. They are expert generalists. Their wide knowledge base supports their creativity.

As it turns out, there are two personality traits that are key for expert generalists: Openness to Experience and Need for Cognition.

Openness to Experience is one of the Big Five personality characteristics identified by psychologists. The Big Five are the characteristics that reflect the biggest differences between people in the way they act. Openness to Experience is the degree to which a person is willing to consider new ideas and opportunities. Some people enjoy the prospect of doing something new and thinking about new things. Other people prefer to stick with familiar ideas and activities.

As you might expect, high levels of Openness to Experience can sometimes be related to creativity. After all, being creative requires doing something that has not been done before. If you are not willing to do something new, then it’s hard to be creative.

However, creativity also requires knowledge. In order to do something that has not been done before in some area, you have to know a lot about that discipline. Creative painters need to know a lot about art and painting. Creative scientists need to be skilled in their science.

If you are not willing to do something new, then it’s hard to be creative.

Convertir la clave del WiFi en un código QR para un rápido acceso


 

Por 

clave wifi codigo qr

Es terriblemente molesto preferir un local sobre los demás debido a que ofrece WiFi gratuito, pero resulta que al entrar se le pregunta a los vigilantes, a los meseros (en caso de ser un local de comidas), a quien atiende en la caja, a otros clientes, etc., y ninguno tiene la más remota idea de cuál es la clave para acceder a la red inalámbrica del lugar.

Algo parecido puede pasar al ir a la casa de un amigo y querer conectarse, pero allí el problema es que puede ser un poco compleja de copiar por sus caracteres raros o porque es algo incómodo escribir desde el móvil. Pues bien, la solución para las anteriores situaciones y otras similares la tenemos enQR4 QR Codes, un portal especializado que entre sus herramientas de generación de códigos cuenta con una que convierte las especificaciones de una red WiFi en un código QR. Leer más “Convertir la clave del WiFi en un código QR para un rápido acceso”

Reflexiones sobre el Brainstorming como herramienta para la generación de ideas. Desde H2i Institute



Desde la perspectiva que da estar estudiando un curso de innovación, me gustaría compartir algunas reflexiones sobre una herramienta potente para la generación de ideas como el brainstorming. Aunque es la más usada por las empresas, es la menos conocida. Sobre el brainstorming hay mucho escrito, estas reflexiones solo pretenden dar otro punto de vista sobre el proceso en sí y los beneficios extra que supone.

La creatividad es una cosa que tenemos todos, en mayor o menor medida, si bien es cierto que hay algunas personas que tienen mas predisposición que otras. La creatividad tiene mucho que ver con lo que somos, con conocerse a uno mismo y con dejar que el subconsciente nos diga cosas. El subconsciente forma parte de nosotros y tenemos que conocerlo y aprender a escucharlo.
Leer más »

Retaining Great Employees: It’s Not About the Money


Written by Mansur Hasib

As IT managers and leaders, it is our job to foster the professional growth of everyone who works on our team. If we do not do this we are failing as leaders.

I have had many discussions on the topic of training with both employees and managers. Many IT managers are afraid that certifications will make their employees more marketable and allow them to find better opportunities. Employees are frustrated that their managers do not allow them to grow and so eventually they leave to find better opportunities to learn and to grow professionally.

When I was negotiating my budget as a CIO, I asked for and received $2,000 per year for every employee that could only be used for travel or training. It required the consultation of supervisors and could be used for a conference or even a certification. Since some training is more expensive, employees were allowed to trade and give someone their training dollars for one year so they could get it back from the recipient in a subsequent year. At times I was able to recruit someone simply because I had this guaranteed annual training benefit.

Leer más “Retaining Great Employees: It’s Not About the Money”

InnovationTools.com | new articles


Are you called to be an innovation leader?
If you want to be innovative, you need to be a leader. No individual or organization has become an innovative one by copying the actions of their competitors or peers. That may seem obvious, but evidence shows that most people fail to realize this critical fact.

Tricks For Battling Creative Blocks, From Leading Creatives | fastcodesign.com


2012 HOW Conference, Sketch 5

A NEW BOOK COLLECTS THE WISDOM OF DESIGNERS, ARTISTS, AND WRITERS ON HOW TO COURT THE MUSE.
fastcodesign.com

It’s one of the most dreaded moments in the life of a creative person. The muse packs her bags, walks out the door, and doesn’t leave word as to when she’ll come back. Many of us, myself included, sink into a deep, dark despair filled with doubt and worry. Does she just need a weekend away, or has she gone on a round-the-world cruise? Hell, was she ever there in the first place, or have you been deluding yourself in thinking that you were actually talented.

The easy thing to do, especially when a deadline is looming, is to lose perspective. The harder but much more productive mindset is to realize that you–and virtually everyone you respect and admire–have overcome blocks in the past. You might even say that it’s part of the process. So have a lot of successful people you think never have such problems producing work. “Anyone who tells you they don’t encounter creative block is either not passionate about what they do or is stealing someone else’s ideas,” asserts the graphic designer Mike McQuade. He, along with 89 others, from Nicholas Felton to Debbie Millman, have contributed their encouraging words to Breakthrough!, a new book edited by Alex Cornell compiling advice on how to clear creative hurdles. Most seem to agree with this strategy: When you hit a wall, don’t stew; change course. And as soon as you find yourself engaging in some other activity and forgetting the muse, she just might reappear.

Here are some more suggestions for sparking inspiration, ranging from checking into a fancy hotel to just checking out.

1. FIND YOURSELF A GENIUS.
–Aaron Koblin, digital-media artist
They say an elephant never forgets. Well, you are not an elephant. Take notes, constantly. Save interesting thoughts, quotations, films, technologies . . . the medium doesn’t matter, so long as it inspires you. When you’re stumped, go to your notes like a wizard to his spell book. Mash those thoughts together. Extend them in every direction until they meet.

Your notebook is feeling thin? Then seek assistance and find yourself a genius. Geniuses come in many shapes and colors, and they often run in packs. If you can find one, it may lead you to others. Collaborate with geniuses. Send them your spells. Look carefully at theirs. What could you do together? Combination is creation.

Beware of addictive medicines. Everything in moderation. This applies particularly to the Internet and your sofa. The physical world is ultimately the source of all inspiration. Which is to say, if all else falls: take a bike ride.

2. TALK THROUGH IT.
–Sean Freeman, illustrator
For me the best way to overcome creative block is with space, going for a walk, distancing myself from the desk. When I’m walking I can think things through, and I talk it through too, with myself and with whoever is nearby. There’s really something to be said for the adage “a problem shared is a problem halved,” even if you’re talking aloud to yourself.

3. CHECK INTO AN EXPENSIVE HOTEL.
–Claire Dederer, writer
This only works if you are a little on the cheap side.
Check into an expensive hotel for three nights. It’s good if it’s near the airport or some other deeply boring location. Bring whatever you need to get hopped up: candy, bourbon, coffee, nicotine patches. Also, pants with an elastic waist. And a stack of books that you love but that you have read at least twice already. Once you’ve checked in, give the remote to the front desk and instruct them not to give it back to you, no matter how much you beg.

Now. Write ten thousand words. If you feel blocked, just think about all the money you’re wasting, sitting there, staring into space like an idiot.

4. FOLLOW THESE TEN EASY STEPS.
–Debbie Millman, writer and artist
1. Get enough sleep! Sleep is the best (and easiest) creative aphrodisiac.

2. Read as much as you can, particularly classics. If a master of words can’t inspire you, see number 3.

3. Color code your library. This is fun, and you will realize how many great books you have that you haven’t read yet.

4. More sleep! You can never get enough.

5. Force yourself to procrastinate. Works every time!

6. Look at the work of Tibor Kalman, Marian Bantjes, Jessica Hische, Christoph Niemann, and Paul Sahre.

7. Weep. And then weep some more.

8. Surf the Web. Write inane tweets. Check out your high school friends on Facebook. Feel smug.

9. Watch Law & Order: SVU marathons. Revel in the ferocious beauty of Olivia Benson.

10. Remember how L-U-C-K-Y you are to be a creative person to begin with and quit your bellyaching. Get to work now!

5. KEEP YOUR PLATE FULL.
–Nicolas Felton, information designer
I tend to say yes to more than I can do, and the fear of failure keeps the work flowing. When I’m really at a loss–when it feels like my designs are simply circling the drain–I will leave the office. There’s no point in trying to blindly bump into a solution, so whether it’s sketching in the park or reading a book, I avoid trying to use brute force–it’s like trying to get rid of the hiccups.

6. WHY NOT TRY COFFEE RIGHT BEFORE BED.
–Camm Rowland, creative director at Digital Kitchen
Some people get all of their best ideas in the shower. Others swear by coffee shop visits or vintage shopping. Personally, I get lots of ideas on airplanes. Maybe it’s the drone of the engine muting my surroundings that helps me concentrate or the fact that I am blissfully unreachable via e-mail for at least a couple of hours. Similarly, I tend to get a lot of good thinking done when I’m on a long drive. The monotony of the road can be very meditative.

Now, if all this mind-clearing business isn’t your cup of tea, why not try coffee–right before bed. It’ll do the opposite of everything I’ve described thus far and likely turn that mental traffic jam into a high-speed demolition derby. Of course, the suggestion of laying in the dark for hours with your pulse and mind racing is terrible medical advice–but hey, I’m not a doctor. Take notes. In the morning, 75 percent will be unintelligible, 20 percent will be laughable, and 5 percent might actually be pretty awesome.

7. PAINT THE BARN. Leer más “Tricks For Battling Creative Blocks, From Leading Creatives | fastcodesign.com”

3 Sure-Fire Ways to Generate New and Great Ideas | via pickthebrain.com


pickthebrain.com



Do you want new and great ideas?

The kind that makes people

  • Smile in wonder and possibility after you introduce it
  • Question why they don’t ask for your opinion more often
  • Recognize how intelligent, creative and brilliant you really are

If you’re nodding your head, I have a question for you:

What’s the problem?

Why aren’t you coming up with awesome ideas?

Why do you have trouble coming up with even good ideas?

It’s probably because you believe that great ideas are reserved for a lucky few.

I have some good news and bad news for you.

First, the bad (that’s the way I prefer it): To have new and great ideas require work. The belief that an excellent idea just pops into your head in an AHA! moment is wrong. Eureka, like overnight success, takes time.

Now the good: It is possible for anyone to generate great ideas. Stop thinking that you can’t be creative and realize that you just don’t know how. You have all the resources you need to create awesome ideas and lucky for you, this article will show you how to do it.

Broaden Your Horizons… Leer más “3 Sure-Fire Ways to Generate New and Great Ideas | via pickthebrain.com”

How do you encourage employees to share ideas? | via game-changer.net



This is the second of a series of weekly posts where I will answer a few common questions about innovation. Please feel free to add your own response. Also, if you have any questions you think we should discuss, let me know.

Good ideas can come from anywhere, but just asking for them doesn’t mean everyone will speak their minds. I think this is where a gap exists between activating innovation and simply talking about it. It’s also why it is important for leaders to be open and share their thought process with others to encourage dialogue.

Beyond the Here are a few more ways: Leer más “How do you encourage employees to share ideas? | via game-changer.net”

To Boost Creativity, Study Abroad


Pacific Standard

New research confirms that spending a semester studying overseas enhances one’s ability to find innovative solutions.

Looking to hire someone who will make a creative contribution to your organization? Here’s a tip: When checking applicants’ college transcripts, don’t focus exclusively on their grades or honors.

Take note of whether they spent time studying abroad.

That’s the implication of newly published research, which provides the best evidence yet that studying overseas boosts one’s creativity. A semester spent in Spain or Senegal leads to higher creativity scores on two different tests, according to research conducted by Christine Lee, David Therriault, and Tracy Linderholm of the University of Florida, Gainesville.

“Cultural experiences from living abroad have wide-reaching benefits on students’ creativity, including the facilitation of complex cognitive processes that promote creative thinking,” the researchers write in the journal Applied Cognitive Psychology.

The link between studying abroad and enhanced creativity was first made in a 2009 paper by William Maddux and Adam Galinsky, who found students who spent time overseas were more likely to come up with innovative insights. Like many studies, however, it didn’t quite establish causality. The authors couldn’t say for certain that the experience was transformative, admitting it is possible that people choose to study outside the country are more creative to begin with. Leer más “To Boost Creativity, Study Abroad”

Why Your Inner Critic Is Your Best Friend

You might find it helpful to use one workspace for drafting/sketching/experimenting, and another for reviewing your work.
Before you start work, take a moment to reflect on the advantages of having a finely honed critical faculty.

Another thing to try before you start work is telling yourself, “I’m not really going to start just yet, I’ll just make a few sketches” – or scribble a few notes, or practice a few scales, or the equivalent for your creative medium.

When you’re working, if the Critic starts telling you what’s wrong with the piece, ask yourself, “So what does the work need instead?” or “So what do I need to do to make it better?”

If the Critic keeps interfering, promise yourself that you’ll do a critical review at the end of this stage of execution – so you can afford to ignore her now and keep your momentum going.


You and Your Critic

When have you been most grateful for possessing sharp critical judgment?

Do you agree that your Inner Critic is – potentially – your best friend?

Any tips for utilizing your critical faculty more effectively in the creative process?


The Inner Critic gets a lot of bad press, especially among blocked creatives who wish the nagging critical voice at the back of their mind would disappear. No wonder there’s so much creativity advice on how to banish, silence, or obliterate the Inner Critic. By the time the creative thinking gurus are done, the Critic’s had a tougher pounding than an extra from Kill Bill.
But do you ever wonder why the Critic keeps coming back for more? Could it be that the Critic is actually a very important part of your creative process?
If you think about it, you’d be in big trouble without an Inner Critic. Without some kind of internal quality filter, you’d be happy to churn out any old rubbish – and join the ranks of mediocrities. A finely honed critical faculty is one of the things that separates a creative professional from the legions of amateurs.
In the words of musician Mike Monday:
A good producer and a great producer have the same number of ideas – some good, some great. But a great producer will know the difference.
And the great producer’s Inner Critic is the difference that makes the difference. Because the great producer has listened more keenly and thought more sharply about music, she has a more powerful and useful Inner Critic.
So the Inner Critic isn’t the enemy, just an over-zealous friend who’s delivering the criticism too forcefully and without considering your feelings. We all have friends who do that from time to time.
The trick is to get the Critic back “onside,” delivering genuinely constructive criticism. Like the inspiring mentor who urged you to do your best and didn’t accept anything less – but with a supportive and encouraging tone of voice. Leer más “Why Your Inner Critic Is Your Best Friend”

The 5 Types of Work That Fill Your Day

What We Learn When We Audit Our Work

Taking all five types of work into perspective, we can audit our day and the types of work we engage in most.

My typical day includes 2-5 types of work, with the majority being Reactionary Work. I hate to admit it, but I find that Reactionary Work constantly bleeds over into my efforts to schedule myself (Planning Work) and the deep thinking required to solve problems (Problem-Solving Work).

I also find that, between nearly any type of work, I usually slip into a period of Reactionary Work that may include surfing the top of my email inbox, or a period of Insecurity Work, which usually comes in the form of scanning Twitter messages about our business.


http://the99percent.com
by Scott Belsky
Illustration: Oscar Ramos Orozco
Hacking work is all the rage these days, along with tips for managing email, taking notes, and running meetings. But, at a higher level, what can we learn from analyzing the different types of work we do and how we allocate our time?First, let’s take a look at the five kinds of work we do every day:

1. Reactionary Work
In the modern age, most of our day is consumed by Reactionary Work, during which we are focused only on responding to messages and requests – emails, text messages, Facebook messages, tweets, voicemails, and the list goes on. You are constantly reacting to what comes into you rather than being proactive in what matters most to you. Reactionary Work is necessary, but you can’t let it consume you.

2. Planning Work >>> Leer más “The 5 Types of Work That Fill Your Day”