Importante Empresa Multinacional: Responsable de IT


http://bit.uz/oAkJ


Orientamos la búsqueda a un profesional de las carreras de Ingeniería en Informática o carreras afines, con experiencia no menor a 5 años en posiciones similares en empresas de primera línea.

Deberá contar con manejo de Ingles avanzado y conocimientos de sistemas operativos, servidores, data warehousing, centrales telefónicas y programación.
Principales Responsabilidades:
  • Responsable de la gestión del departamento de IT.
  • Coordinación e implementación de proyectos de mejora.
  • Soporte a planta en materia de trazabilidad, mejoras en sistema de MRP e inventarios.
  • Mantenimiento y gestión de hardware de usuarios (telefonía móvil, pc, otros)
  • Mantenimiento de redes y servidores
La empresa ofrece excelentes condiciones de contratación.
A los interesados solicitamos el envió detallado de antecedentes laborales y personales, mencionando remuneración pretendida y ref. RIT a: cv2@arriverrhh.com.ar | @arrivedho | @luisgiobbio

Domain-Driven Design | TutOriAL…(para [des] y entendidos) by Chris Peters


In my country, you won’t make it through school without reading how Goethe’s Faust complains, I’ve studied now Philosophy – And Jurisprudence, Medicine, – And even, alas! Theology – All through and through with ardour keen! – Here now I stand, poor fool.

Sadly, none of his efforts and studies helped the doctor to perceive whatever holds the world together in its inmost folds.

Domain-Driven DesignAnd here we are in IT: We’ve studied languages and frameworks, libraries and even – alas – the IE! All through and through with ardour keen. But how many times did we focus on whatever holds the application together in its inmost folds? Today’s topic is the business domain.


Business Logic and Software Design

Business logic is sometimes considered to be unique, and it is by definition! If the business logic of an application wouldn’t be unique, there’d be no need to write an application, as there’s already an existing solution (with the exception of when an application exists but is not available). Hence, many developers see themself as pioneers, to boldly go where no man has gone before. Romantics aside, while the business logic itself may be unique to a noteworthy degree, the techniques to implement it are not. That’s why smart process models like Rational Unified Process or Scrum along with techniques like iterative and incremental development cycles were invited. Talented software architects have elaborated approaches for software design as well; among them Eric Evans who coined the term Domain Driven Design in his book with the same title.

Developers go boldly, where no man has gone before.

I’ll give an overview on how Domain Driven Design can influence the consulting process, as well as its basic concepts for designing a domain model. Finally, we will discuss the infrastructure requirements that are needed to implement a domain with ease.

Engineering Requirements

Let’s say you are a software architect on a non-trivial application with a non-trivial domain, like the core engine of a large logistic company. Many people are joining the planning talks, among them project managers, account managers, marketing, consultants and so on. Not everyone is needed to get the job done (I won’t share my opinions on to whom this applies), but two people will play a crucial role during the process of requirements engineering: you, the architect, and the domain expert.

software architect (at least in business context) should have a very good abstract understanding on how processes work, how they are designed and optimized.

That’s true because business applications are mainly about designing efficient and beautiful digital equivalents of business processes. A domain expert should have an in-depth knowledge about a specific set of processes, namely the processes that are taking place in the logistic company and that should be reflected by the application. I found that business consultants, sales manager and marketing experts make a few good and valuable points along the way, but as long as you don’t have someone in the team who got his hands dirty in years of experience, the project will fail. For example, your domain expert should know the width of the loading ramp at the depot and if there’s enough space to install a barcode scanner.

So it’s you, specialized in digital business processes, software design and [fill in your favourite tools here], and an expert on logistics with knowledge on the company’s clients, employees and the day-to-day routine. Chances are, you’ll talk at cross-purposes. Domain Driven Design suggests some strategies that can form a powerful technical consulting service. Here’s mine:

  • Create an ubiquitos language
  • Build a glossary of keywords
  • Shift from a process oriented view to a domain centered approach.
  • Build a visual model as the foundation of your business logic.

Sounds like fun! Let’s dive into the details.

In every industry, every group of experts has its own terminology. It’s refined in every company and enriched with the companies special terms and product names. Think of IT: when people like us meet for serious geek talk, who else would understand a word? The same is true for your domain, and the first thing to do is to define a set of terms. Walk through the entire set of processes that the software should reflect and listen closely how the domain expert describes it. Any domain specific terms should be defined in a way that dictionaries do. You should be aware of words that sound familiar but are not in the given context. Some companies have never done that job before, even if it’s valuable for other areas.

Make a dedicated glossary of your ubiquitous terms, be sure that it gets approved by the client, and charge for the consulting process! A glossary may look like this:

Get Organized Now: 3 Ways to Get Organized

Getting organized can be a huge pain the butt. Tasks pile up, your to-do list gets out of control, you feel overwhelmed with all that needs done, and you dread home office organization. Yet, if you want to have peace of mind and a clean work space, you need to get organized. So how to get organized, then? Well, you’re in luck, because this article features three ways to get organized.

Learning how to get organized is very simple. The point is to get organized so that you then focus on your important task at hand. Or your life. But definitely not focusing on the organizing itself. Getting organized is a means to an end.

So without further ado, here are the three ways to get organized:
1. Productively Procrastinate

You will inevitably procrastinate during part of your week. It’s fine – we all do. We’re only human. But just because you procrastinate doesn’t mean you need to waste time. You should productively procrastinate.

When you want to avoid doing the major task in front of you, take care of some not-as-important-but-still-useful tasks on your to-do list. The ones that don’t require much thought are especially good. Maybe it’s cleaning and organizing files and folders on your computer, or doing some home office organization. Anything that’s been lingering on your to-do list.

While these tasks aren’t the really important ones, they’re still useful. And rather than wasting your time surfing the web or watching cat videos, you can more effectively spend your procrastination time. Plus, you don’t have to set aside special time for getting organized: you simply use the pockets of time for when you feel like procrastinating. Productive procrastination is actually some of the best moments to get organized.


Organized

Getting organized can be a huge pain the butt. Tasks pile up, your to-do list gets out of control, you feel overwhelmed with all that needs done, and you dread home office organization. Yet, if you want to have peace of mind and a clean work space, you need to get organized. So how to get organized, then? Well, you’re in luck, because this article features three ways to get organized.

Learning how to get organized is very simple. The point is to get organized so that you then focus on your important task at hand. Or your life. But definitely not focusing on the organizing itself. Getting organized is a means to an end.

So without further ado, here are the three ways to get organized:

1. Productively Procrastinate

You will inevitably procrastinate during part of your week. It’s fine – we all do. We’re only human. But just because you procrastinate doesn’t mean you need to waste time. You should productively procrastinate.

When you want to avoid doing the major task in front of you, take care of some not-as-important-but-still-useful tasks on your to-do list. The ones that don’t require much thought are especially good. Maybe it’s cleaning and organizing files and folders on your computer, or doing some home office organization. Anything that’s been lingering on your to-do list.

While these tasks aren’t the really important ones, they’re still useful. And rather than wasting your time surfing the web or watching cat videos, you can more effectively spend your procrastination time. Plus, you don’t have to set aside special time for getting organized: you simply use the pockets of time for when you feel like procrastinating. Productive procrastination is actually some of the best moments to get organized. Leer más “Get Organized Now: 3 Ways to Get Organized”

10 Data Points: Information and Analytics at Work

The New Intelligent Enterprise inquiry is all about the intensifying wave of data that organizations are facing, and its implications for managers. Companies are becoming data driven in ways that are new, raw and — in many cases — untested. And now so are we: We’re trying something new by letting the data come first, without a lot of editing or parsing. Here is a slice of the raw goods, a kind of behind-the-scenes look at the data we gathered from our survey of nearly 3,000 managers and executives from every major industry and all regions of the globe. (Also see “10 Insights: A First Look at The New Intelligent Enterprise Survey.”)

We chose these 10 charts to share because they captured our attention. Some are provocative, some are telling, and some raise questions we haven’t even tried to answer yet. They’re by no means comprehensive, and our final report will cover many more points accompanied by rigorous analysis. But we do think you’ll find these graphics worth a look if for no other reason than that they allow you to do some immediate benchmarking. How does your organization compare with others? What are your peers doing, and how might that influence decisions you’re considering right now?

The survey respondents answered two questions that allowed us to group them and their answers in some interesting ways. One question asked them to assess where their organization is along the journey to an ideal state: an organization that has been “transformed by better ways to collect, analyze and be prescriptively guided by information.” Those that were farthest along that path we deemed Sophisticates; those who were midway became Intermediates; while those that were just beginning to look at data and analytics we called Starters.

We also asked them to describe their organization’s competitive position. Those that rated themselves as substantially outperforming their industry peers we named Top Performers. Those that were underperforming we labeled Lower Performers. You’ll note both groups called out in the accompanying charts.


By Nina Kruschwitz and Rebecca Shockley | http://sloanreview.mit.edu

Early returns are in from the first annual New Intelligent Enterprise Survey. Here are major highlights of what executives and managers said about how they are — or are not — capitalizing on information.

The New Intelligent Enterprise inquiry is all about the intensifying wave of data that organizations are facing, and its implications for managers. Companies are becoming data driven in ways that are new, raw and — in many cases — untested. And now so are we: We’re trying something new by letting the data come first, without a lot of editing or parsing. Here is a slice of the raw goods, a kind of behind-the-scenes look at the data we gathered from our survey of nearly 3,000 managers and executives from every major industry and all regions of the globe. (Also see “10 Insights: A First Look at The New Intelligent Enterprise Survey.”)

We chose these 10 charts to share because they captured our attention. Some are provocative, some are telling, and some raise questions we haven’t even tried to answer yet. They’re by no means comprehensive, and our final report will cover many more points accompanied by rigorous analysis. But we do think you’ll find these graphics worth a look if for no other reason than that they allow you to do some immediate benchmarking. How does your organization compare with others? What are your peers doing, and how might that influence decisions you’re considering right now?

The survey respondents answered two questions that allowed us to group them and their answers in some interesting ways. One question asked them to assess where their organization is along the journey to an ideal state: an organization that has been “transformed by better ways to collect, analyze and be prescriptively guided by information.” Those that were farthest along that path we deemed Sophisticates; those who were midway became Intermediates; while those that were just beginning to look at data and analytics we called Starters.

We also asked them to describe their organization’s competitive position. Those that rated themselves as substantially outperforming their industry peers we named Top Performers. Those that were underperforming we labeled Lower Performers. You’ll note both groups called out in the accompanying charts. Leer más “10 Data Points: Information and Analytics at Work”