TOILETTHINK- What happened? LA NOSTRA INIZIATIVA! – #TOILETTHINK


ToiletThink it’s a Sieropositivo.it’s initiative against the spread of HIV virus amongst women.
Get more info at http://www.toiletthink.it
Support Sieropositivo.it

Información de ToiletThink

Le più recenti statistiche mostrano come i casi di HIV attribuibili a rapporti sessuali non protetti sfiorino il 78,8%. E secondo le nuove diagnosi le donne italiane paiono essere le più colpite, con tassi d’incidenza in costante crescita.

20+ New Brochure Design Examples – thnxz @topdesignmag


 

Finding a new brochure design that can inspire you can cause a real headache that can ruin you your time. That’s my reason for collecting for you more than 20 brochure designs that rock. Getting inspiration from these examples will help you pass the first step and start designing.

http://www.topdesignmag.com


 

¿Mucha noche? 4 aplicaciones para dormir como un bebé


Image representing iPhone as depicted in Crunc...

http://therealtrends.com

Trabajo, salidas, presiones y actividades varias ocupan nuestra agenda, cada día más completa. ¿Cómo bajar un cambio? Con tu iPhone es posible un mejor descanso. Mirá.


Sleep Cycle

Esta app es una alarma muy popular en el mundo iPhone. Pero además se supone que te despierta a la hora indicada teniendo en cuenta la etapa de sueño en la que nos encontramos. ¿Magia? Leer más “¿Mucha noche? 4 aplicaciones para dormir como un bebé”

Return on Failure: The Equation

What is failure? When things don’t go according to plan or expectations, ending up with unexpected and/or undesired outcomes (which we can argue could have been avoidable, or not). The key is ‘undesired’ – because if they were desired and not planned or expected, that would still be great! But, as we will see, failure is a terrific way to learn. Maybe we could measure learning as Return on Failure: ROF.

We’ve all heard the phrase “fail often, fail cheap, fail fast.” So, can we do a better job of learning from failure? We’re not built to do this easily, either by learning from others’ failures or our own. There are many ways to learn from failure, so what I’m suggesting is just one way.

One way we could start learning from failure is through a simple 3-step process (bear in mind, simple ≠ easy!):

1. Identification of the Failure(s)
2. Analysis of the Failure(s)
3. Iterative Experimenting & Prototyping based on the learnings from the failures

So, and check my ‘math’, ROF is the sum of Failure Identification + Failure Analysis applied over (and over…) Iterative Experimenting & Prototyping. That’s the framework (for now).

ROF = (FI + FA)/IEP…





http://www.mills-scofield.com

What is failure? When things don’t go according to plan or expectations, ending up with unexpected and/or undesired outcomes (which we can argue could have been avoidable, or not).  The key is ‘undesired‘ – because if they were desired and not planned or expected, that would still be great!  But, as we will see, failure is a terrific way to learn.  Maybe we could measure learning as Return on Failure: ROF.

We’ve all heard the phrase “fail often, fail cheap, fail fast.” So, can we do a better job of learning from failure?  We’re not built to do this easily, either by learning from others’ failures or our own.  There are many ways to learn from failure, so what I’m suggesting is just one way.

One way we could start learning from failure is through a simple 3-step process (bear in mind, simple ≠ easy!):

  1. Identification of the Failure(s)
  2. Analysis of the Failure(s)
  3. Iterative Experimenting & Prototyping based on the learnings from the failures

So, and check my ‘math’, ROF is the sum of Failure Identification + Failure Analysis applied over (and over…) Iterative Experimenting & Prototyping.  That’s the framework (for now).

ROF = (FI + FA)/IEP… Leer más “Return on Failure: The Equation”

Why Companies Should Insist that Employees Take Naps

The problem is that most corporate cultures remain addicted to the draining ethic of more, bigger, faster. Rest, by this paradigm, is for slackers. Until your employer sees through that myth, consider these tips to take matters into your own hands:

* Schedule a regular time for your nap — between 1 and 3 p.m. is ideal — to increase the likelihood that you’ll take it.
* If you have your own office, create a cheeky sign for your door to set expectations others. As in: “Short nap in process to insure high afternoon productivity.”
* If you work in a cubicle, see if you can find a quiet space for your nap, even if it means leaving the building and taking your nap on a park bench, at a Starbucks or in a local library.
* Turn off your technology and set an alarm for 20 or 30 minutes.
* Close your eyes (obviously) but don’t try too hard to fall asleep. Instead, breathe in through your nose to a count of three, and out through your mouth to a count of six. Even if you don’t fall asleep, this way of breathing will insure you’ll get a rejuvenating rest.


by Tony Schwartz | //blogs.hbr.org

Good luck, right?

But here’s the reality: naps are a powerful source of competitive advantage. The recent evidence is overwhelming: naps are not just physically restorative, but also improve perceptual skills, motor skills, reaction time and alertness.

I experienced the power of naps myself when I was writing my new book, The Way We’re Working Isn’t Working.
I wrote at home, in the mornings, in three separate, highly focused 90 minute sessions. By the time I finished the last one, I was usually exhausted — physically, mentally and emotionally. I ate lunch and then took a 20 to 30 minute nap on a Barcalounger chair, which I bought just for that purpose.

When I awoke, I felt incredibly rejuvenated. Where I might otherwise have dragged myself through the afternoon, I was able to focus effectively on work other than writing until 7 pm or so, without feeling fatigued.

When Sara Mednick, a former Harvard researcher, gave her subjects a memory challenge, she allowed half of them to take a 60 to 90 minute nap, the nappers dramatically outperformed the non-nappers. In another study, Mednick had subjects practice a visual task at four intervals over the course of a day. Those who took a 30 minute nap after the second session sustained their performance all day long. Those who didn’t nap performed increasingly poorly as the day wore on. Leer más “Why Companies Should Insist that Employees Take Naps”

Column: Redefining Failure

by Seth Godin

We think we know what failure looks like. Products don’t get purchased. Reorganizations make things worse. Shipments aren’t delivered. Speeches don’t get applauded. Things explode. These are the emergencies and disasters that we have nightmares about.

We think that failure is the opposite of success, and we optimize our organizations to avoid it. We install layers and layers of management to eliminate risk and prevent catastrophes. One surefire way we’ve found to avoid failing is to narrowly define what failure is—in other words, to treat almost everything that happens as a nonfailure. If the outcome of our efforts isn’t a failure, there’s no need to panic, is there? Failure creates urgency. Failure gets you fired. Failure cannot stand; it demands a response. But the status quo is simply embraced and, incredibly, protected.


by Seth Godin

We think we know what failure looks like. Products don’t get purchased. Reorganizations make things worse. Shipments aren’t delivered. Speeches don’t get applauded. Things explode. These are the emergencies and disasters that we have nightmares about.

We think that failure is the opposite of success, and we optimize our organizations to avoid it. We install layers and layers of management to eliminate risk and prevent catastrophes. One surefire way we’ve found to avoid failing is to narrowly define what failure is—in other words, to treat almost everything that happens as a nonfailure. If the outcome of our efforts isn’t a failure, there’s no need to panic, is there? Failure creates urgency. Failure gets you fired. Failure cannot stand; it demands a response. But the status quo is simply embraced and, incredibly, protected. Leer más “Column: Redefining Failure”

Funny News: Weekly Dosage Of Offbeat And Interesting Articles


by Tony

Here at Designrfix we are trying something new this week. We have decided that every Wednesday we will break away from all our design related news and showcase some really funky stories/articles from across the web. These stories may vary from design topics to just crazy and funny stuff. Really we are just giving ourselves a break from our day to day routine and posting something we can all laugh at. I am confident you will get a kick out of them. Enjoy!

Hyper Realistic Paintings by Victor Rodriguez

Hyper Realistic Paintings by Victor RodriguezHyper Realistic Paintings by Victor Rodriguez

Annoying phone call about hemorrhoids at the pharmacy

Annoying phone call about hemorrhoids at the pharmacyAnnoying phone call about hemorrhoids at the pharmacy Leer más “Funny News: Weekly Dosage Of Offbeat And Interesting Articles”

The Medical RevolutionWhere are the cures promised by stem cells, gene therapy, and the human genome?

Dr. J. William Langston has been researching Parkinson’s disease for 25 years. At one time, it seemed likely he’d have to find another disease to study, because a cure for Parkinson’s looked imminent. In the late 1980s, the field of regenerative medicine seemed poised to make it possible for doctors to put healthy tissue in a damaged brain, reversing the destruction caused by the disease.

Langston was one of many optimists. In 1999, the then-head of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Dr. Gerald Fischbach, testified before the Senate that with “skill and luck,” Parkinson’s could be cured in five to 10 years. Now Langston, who is 67, doesn’t think he’ll see a Parkinson’s cure in his professional lifetime. He no longer uses “the C word” and acknowledges he and others were naive. He understands the anger of patients who, he says, “are getting quite bitter” that they remain ill, long past the time when they thought they would have been restored to health.

The disappointments are so acute in part because the promises have been so big. Over the past two decades, we’ve been told that a new age of molecular medicine—using gene therapy, stem cells, and the knowledge gleaned from unlocking the human genome—would bring us medical miracles. Just as antibiotics conquered infectious diseases and vaccines eliminated the scourges of polio and smallpox, the ability to manipulate our cells and genes is supposed to vanquish everything from terrible inherited disorders, such as Huntington’s and cystic fibrosis, to widespread conditions like cancer, diabetes, and heart disease.
[Más…]

Adding to the frustration is an endless stream of laboratory animals that are always getting healed. Mice with Parkinson’s have been successfully treated with stem cells, as have mice with sickle cell anemia. Dogs with hemophilia and muscular dystrophy have been made disease-free. But humans keep experiencing suffering and death. Why? What explains the tremendous mismatch between expectation and reality? Are the cures really coming, just more slowly than expected? Or have scientists fundamentally misled us, and themselves, about the potential of new medical technologies?

The Brain Is Not a Pincushion
Parkinson’s disease was long held out as the model for new knowledge and technologies eradicating illnesses. Instead, it has become the model for its unforeseen consequences.

Langston, head of the Parkinson’s Institute and Clinical Center, explains that scientists believed the damage to patients took place in a discrete part of the brain, the substantia nigra. “It was a small target. All we’d have to do was replace the missing cells, do it once, and that would cure the disease,” Langston says. “We were wrong about that. This disease hits many other areas of the brain. You can’t just put transplants here and there. The brain is not a pincushion.”

Parkinson’s patients in the 1980s were guinea pigs, getting fetal tissue transplants—a precursor of stem-cell therapy—in their brains. After reports of dramatic improvement, it seemed like a new era had begun. But to make sure the results were real, in the 1990s a group of patients agreed to undergo a double-blind study: Half would get brain surgery with the fetal tissue, half would get holes drilled in their heads and no transplant. (Yes, there are patients willing to have useless holes drilled in their heads for the sake of advancing science.)

It was a huge disappointment when the two groups showed only a marginal difference in disease manifestation—the previous benefits, it turned out, were largely placebo effect. Then, horrifyingly, a year after the surgery, a major difference appeared. Fifteen percent of the patients who received the fetal tissue developed “tragic, catastrophic” uncontrollable movements.


By Emily Yoffe

Illustration by Rob Donnelly. Click image to expand.Dr. J. William Langston has been researching Parkinson’s disease for 25 years. At one time, it seemed likely he’d have to find another disease to study, because a cure for Parkinson’s looked imminent. In the late 1980s, the field of regenerative medicine seemed poised to make it possible for doctors to put healthy tissue in a damaged brain, reversing the destruction caused by the disease.

Langston was one of many optimists. In 1999, the then-head of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Dr. Gerald Fischbach, testified before the Senate that with “skill and luck,” Parkinson’s could be cured in five to 10 years. Now Langston, who is 67, doesn’t think he’ll see a Parkinson’s cure in his professional lifetime. He no longer uses “the C word” and acknowledges he and others were naive. He understands the anger of patients who, he says, “are getting quite bitter” that they remain ill, long past the time when they thought they would have been restored to health.

The disappointments are so acute in part because the promises have been so big. Over the past two decades, we’ve been told that a new age of molecular medicine—using gene therapy, stem cells, and the knowledge gleaned from unlocking the human genome—would bring us medical miracles. Just as antibiotics conquered infectious diseases and vaccines eliminated the scourges of polio and smallpox, the ability to manipulate our cells and genes is supposed to vanquish everything from terrible inherited disorders, such as Huntington’s and cystic fibrosis, to widespread conditions like cancer, diabetes, and heart disease.

Polish Porn Teaches Men Breast Cancer Awareness NSFW

Sometimes to make a great promotional campaign you have to get creative and take a route that seems a little risqué and “out there” to reach your target audience. Polish marketing agency Change Integrated has done just that with a new interactive campaign designed to spread breast cancer awareness on none other than one of the most popular Polish adult websites. Through the campaign, nearly 175,000 men were trained in the art of breast examination and informed of the importance of breast cancer awareness within a single week.

Change Integrated released a video about the campaign. You can click to watch the video on Vimeo, as it is NSFW and the thumbnail image is a little inappropriate, in my humble opinion. But the voiceover in the video explains the idea behind the campaign and why Change Integrated decided to look to porn as a means of spreading breast cancer awareness:

“Most breast cancer campaigns are targeted at female audiences, but the problem also relates to men, as it does concern their partners and wives. Why are we women left alone? Men are not matching to all those conventional leaflets and medical persuasion aimed at women, so how can we educate men on what they can easily do to help? We decided to base our campaign on a cliché, yet true insight—Men are big kids, and they learn best when playing.”



Posted by Megan O’Neill

Magic Boob GirlSometimes to make a great promotional campaign you have to get creative and take a route that seems a little risqué and “out there” to reach your target audiencePolish marketing agency Change Integrated has done just that with a new interactive campaign designed to spread breast cancer awareness on none other than one of the most popular Polish adult websites.  Through the campaign, nearly 175,000 men were trained in the art of breast examination and informed of the importance of breast cancer awareness within a single week.

Change Integrated released a video about the campaign.  You can click to watch the video on Vimeo, as it is NSFW and the thumbnail image is a little inappropriate, in my humble opinion.  But the voiceover in the video explains the idea behind the campaign and why Change Integrated decided to look to porn as a means of spreading breast cancer awareness:

“Most breast cancer campaigns are targeted at female audiences, but the problem also relates to men, as it does concern their partners and wives.  Why are we women left alone?  Men are not matching to all those conventional leaflets and medical persuasion aimed at women, so how can we educate men on what they can easily do to help?  We decided to base our campaign on a cliché, yet true insight—Men are big kids, and they learn best when playing.” Leer más “Polish Porn Teaches Men Breast Cancer Awareness NSFW”

Focusing on the blind spot in design thinking

The dangers of focus!

“Design thinkers must act like anthropologists or psychologists investigating how people experience the world emotionally and cognitively.” Tim Brown

This reference makes me sharpen my past and present as a psychologist and I jumped out of the chest a character I greatly appreciate the observation.

Consider the observation as the fundamental food for creativity and innovation. However this process of feeding ideas and ways of thinking often emerges a “blind spot”.

Blind spots occur because of the peculiarity of the architecture design of our eyes. Cells at the back of the eye, a layer called the retina, gathers the light, through a lens, all that is before us.

A recent study suggests that the visual system of the brain may create a physiological representation of visual information, around the blind spots, painting a scene automatically consistent that is, filling the void length.


Por jabaldaia

The dangers of focus!

“Design thinkers must act like anthropologists or psychologists investigating how people experience the world emotionally and cognitively.” Tim Brown

This reference makes me sharpen my past and present as a psychologist and I jumped out of the chest a character I greatly appreciate the observation.

Consider the observation as the fundamental food for creativity and innovation. However this process of feeding ideas and ways of thinking often emerges a “blind spot”.

Blind spots occur because of the peculiarity of the architecture design of our eyes. Cells at the back of the eye, a layer called the retina, gathers the light, through a lens, all that is before us.

A recent study suggests that the visual system of the brain may create a physiological representation of visual information, around the blind spots, painting a scene automatically consistent that is, filling the void length. Leer más “Focusing on the blind spot in design thinking”

5 Innovations Inspired by Liberation of Data

The air was electric. Voices buzzed in anticipation. I had never seen so many people in once place that were all excited about health data. I actually felt a bit giddy.

That was the scene at yesterday’s Community Health Data Forum at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC. Following the liberation of several government health datasets in March, app developers dashed to see what they could build in 12 short weeks to visualize and make sense of the data. They showcased their solutions yesterday, and applauded HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius’ assertion that “government should be transparent, open, participatory.”



The air was electric. Voices buzzed in anticipation. I had never seen so many people in once place that were all excited about health data. I actually felt a bit giddy.

That was the scene at yesterday’s Community Health Data Forum at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC. Following the liberation of several government health datasets in March, app developers dashed to see what they could build in 12 short weeks to visualize and make sense of the data. They showcased their solutions yesterday, and applauded HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius’ assertion that “government should be transparent, open, participatory.”

Here are the top 5 innovations I saw: Leer más “5 Innovations Inspired by Liberation of Data”

Overtime linked with heart risk: study

After accounting for risk factors such as smoking, excessive weight and high cholesterol, doctors found that working between three and four hours of overtime each day was associated with a 60 per cent greater risk compared to those who did no overtime.

Those who worked overtime tended to be slightly younger than the non-overtime group, were more likely to be male than female, and were in a higher occupational grade.


Heart attack
Image via Wikipedia

Study findings … Longer hours can raise the risk of heart problems.

People who work three hours or more of overtime per day run a 60 per cent higher risk of heart problems compared to those who work regular hours, a study published in the European Heart Journal said.

The findings came from a long-term research project into 6014 British civil servants aged 39-61, two-thirds of whom were men, and who had healthy hearts at the start of the probe in the early 1990s. Leer más “Overtime linked with heart risk: study”

Beware of the chair


March 4, 2010

Office worker.Sitting for prolonged periods has been linked to health problems.

The science is in and it’s scary. Sitting down is bad for you – very bad. So much so that some workplaces are starting to act. Lissa Christopher, who wrote this story standing up, reports.

The time has come for office chairs to come with a health warning and ”upholstered, height-adjustable weapons of mass destruction” might not be too much an exaggeration.

Sitting for prolonged periods – and, let’s face it, few places compete with the office when it comes to opportunities to park one’s behind – is now linked to increased risk of premature death, particularly from cardiovascular disease. It is also associated with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cancer. Leer más “Beware of the chair”

Seth Godin: The Truth About Shipping



by Seth Godin

Here are a few questions I’d like to answer:

  1. Why is it so hard to brainstorm a good idea?
  2. Why do committees usually wreck a project?
  3. Is it true that the more people work on something, the longer it takes?
  4. Why are most products below average (and the rest… meh)?
  5. Why is it so difficult to ship on time?
  6. Why does time pressure and an urgent deadline allow you to get more done and sometimes (if you’re lucky) improve the product itself?

The answer to all six is the same thing: The resistance. Leer más “Seth Godin: The Truth About Shipping”