TOILETTHINK- What happened? LA NOSTRA INIZIATIVA! – #TOILETTHINK


ToiletThink it’s a Sieropositivo.it’s initiative against the spread of HIV virus amongst women.
Get more info at http://www.toiletthink.it
Support Sieropositivo.it

Información de ToiletThink

Le più recenti statistiche mostrano come i casi di HIV attribuibili a rapporti sessuali non protetti sfiorino il 78,8%. E secondo le nuove diagnosi le donne italiane paiono essere le più colpite, con tassi d’incidenza in costante crescita.

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20+ New Brochure Design Examples – thnxz @topdesignmag


 

Finding a new brochure design that can inspire you can cause a real headache that can ruin you your time. That’s my reason for collecting for you more than 20 brochure designs that rock. Getting inspiration from these examples will help you pass the first step and start designing.

http://www.topdesignmag.com


 

¿Mucha noche? 4 aplicaciones para dormir como un bebé


Image representing iPhone as depicted in Crunc...

http://therealtrends.com

Trabajo, salidas, presiones y actividades varias ocupan nuestra agenda, cada día más completa. ¿Cómo bajar un cambio? Con tu iPhone es posible un mejor descanso. Mirá.


Sleep Cycle

Esta app es una alarma muy popular en el mundo iPhone. Pero además se supone que te despierta a la hora indicada teniendo en cuenta la etapa de sueño en la que nos encontramos. ¿Magia? Leer más “¿Mucha noche? 4 aplicaciones para dormir como un bebé”

Return on Failure: The Equation

What is failure? When things don’t go according to plan or expectations, ending up with unexpected and/or undesired outcomes (which we can argue could have been avoidable, or not). The key is ‘undesired’ – because if they were desired and not planned or expected, that would still be great! But, as we will see, failure is a terrific way to learn. Maybe we could measure learning as Return on Failure: ROF.

We’ve all heard the phrase “fail often, fail cheap, fail fast.” So, can we do a better job of learning from failure? We’re not built to do this easily, either by learning from others’ failures or our own. There are many ways to learn from failure, so what I’m suggesting is just one way.

One way we could start learning from failure is through a simple 3-step process (bear in mind, simple ≠ easy!):

1. Identification of the Failure(s)
2. Analysis of the Failure(s)
3. Iterative Experimenting & Prototyping based on the learnings from the failures

So, and check my ‘math’, ROF is the sum of Failure Identification + Failure Analysis applied over (and over…) Iterative Experimenting & Prototyping. That’s the framework (for now).

ROF = (FI + FA)/IEP…





http://www.mills-scofield.com

What is failure? When things don’t go according to plan or expectations, ending up with unexpected and/or undesired outcomes (which we can argue could have been avoidable, or not).  The key is ‘undesired‘ – because if they were desired and not planned or expected, that would still be great!  But, as we will see, failure is a terrific way to learn.  Maybe we could measure learning as Return on Failure: ROF.

We’ve all heard the phrase “fail often, fail cheap, fail fast.” So, can we do a better job of learning from failure?  We’re not built to do this easily, either by learning from others’ failures or our own.  There are many ways to learn from failure, so what I’m suggesting is just one way.

One way we could start learning from failure is through a simple 3-step process (bear in mind, simple ≠ easy!):

  1. Identification of the Failure(s)
  2. Analysis of the Failure(s)
  3. Iterative Experimenting & Prototyping based on the learnings from the failures

So, and check my ‘math’, ROF is the sum of Failure Identification + Failure Analysis applied over (and over…) Iterative Experimenting & Prototyping.  That’s the framework (for now).

ROF = (FI + FA)/IEP… Leer más “Return on Failure: The Equation”

Why Companies Should Insist that Employees Take Naps

The problem is that most corporate cultures remain addicted to the draining ethic of more, bigger, faster. Rest, by this paradigm, is for slackers. Until your employer sees through that myth, consider these tips to take matters into your own hands:

* Schedule a regular time for your nap — between 1 and 3 p.m. is ideal — to increase the likelihood that you’ll take it.
* If you have your own office, create a cheeky sign for your door to set expectations others. As in: “Short nap in process to insure high afternoon productivity.”
* If you work in a cubicle, see if you can find a quiet space for your nap, even if it means leaving the building and taking your nap on a park bench, at a Starbucks or in a local library.
* Turn off your technology and set an alarm for 20 or 30 minutes.
* Close your eyes (obviously) but don’t try too hard to fall asleep. Instead, breathe in through your nose to a count of three, and out through your mouth to a count of six. Even if you don’t fall asleep, this way of breathing will insure you’ll get a rejuvenating rest.


by Tony Schwartz | //blogs.hbr.org

Good luck, right?

But here’s the reality: naps are a powerful source of competitive advantage. The recent evidence is overwhelming: naps are not just physically restorative, but also improve perceptual skills, motor skills, reaction time and alertness.

I experienced the power of naps myself when I was writing my new book, The Way We’re Working Isn’t Working.
I wrote at home, in the mornings, in three separate, highly focused 90 minute sessions. By the time I finished the last one, I was usually exhausted — physically, mentally and emotionally. I ate lunch and then took a 20 to 30 minute nap on a Barcalounger chair, which I bought just for that purpose.

When I awoke, I felt incredibly rejuvenated. Where I might otherwise have dragged myself through the afternoon, I was able to focus effectively on work other than writing until 7 pm or so, without feeling fatigued.

When Sara Mednick, a former Harvard researcher, gave her subjects a memory challenge, she allowed half of them to take a 60 to 90 minute nap, the nappers dramatically outperformed the non-nappers. In another study, Mednick had subjects practice a visual task at four intervals over the course of a day. Those who took a 30 minute nap after the second session sustained their performance all day long. Those who didn’t nap performed increasingly poorly as the day wore on. Leer más “Why Companies Should Insist that Employees Take Naps”

Column: Redefining Failure

by Seth Godin

We think we know what failure looks like. Products don’t get purchased. Reorganizations make things worse. Shipments aren’t delivered. Speeches don’t get applauded. Things explode. These are the emergencies and disasters that we have nightmares about.

We think that failure is the opposite of success, and we optimize our organizations to avoid it. We install layers and layers of management to eliminate risk and prevent catastrophes. One surefire way we’ve found to avoid failing is to narrowly define what failure is—in other words, to treat almost everything that happens as a nonfailure. If the outcome of our efforts isn’t a failure, there’s no need to panic, is there? Failure creates urgency. Failure gets you fired. Failure cannot stand; it demands a response. But the status quo is simply embraced and, incredibly, protected.


by Seth Godin

We think we know what failure looks like. Products don’t get purchased. Reorganizations make things worse. Shipments aren’t delivered. Speeches don’t get applauded. Things explode. These are the emergencies and disasters that we have nightmares about.

We think that failure is the opposite of success, and we optimize our organizations to avoid it. We install layers and layers of management to eliminate risk and prevent catastrophes. One surefire way we’ve found to avoid failing is to narrowly define what failure is—in other words, to treat almost everything that happens as a nonfailure. If the outcome of our efforts isn’t a failure, there’s no need to panic, is there? Failure creates urgency. Failure gets you fired. Failure cannot stand; it demands a response. But the status quo is simply embraced and, incredibly, protected. Leer más “Column: Redefining Failure”

Funny News: Weekly Dosage Of Offbeat And Interesting Articles


by Tony

Here at Designrfix we are trying something new this week. We have decided that every Wednesday we will break away from all our design related news and showcase some really funky stories/articles from across the web. These stories may vary from design topics to just crazy and funny stuff. Really we are just giving ourselves a break from our day to day routine and posting something we can all laugh at. I am confident you will get a kick out of them. Enjoy!

Hyper Realistic Paintings by Victor Rodriguez

Hyper Realistic Paintings by Victor RodriguezHyper Realistic Paintings by Victor Rodriguez

Annoying phone call about hemorrhoids at the pharmacy

Annoying phone call about hemorrhoids at the pharmacyAnnoying phone call about hemorrhoids at the pharmacy Leer más “Funny News: Weekly Dosage Of Offbeat And Interesting Articles”