December 2012 Social Media Report: Facebook Pages in Argentina | socialbakers.com


Vía and Thz
socialbakers.com

Local fan statistics for all Facebook Pages! Our Regional reports are now packed with competitive advantage, unwrap them NOW!

For the first time ever, you can now breakdown your competitors’ Facebook page fans by country. You are now able to see any brand´s fan distribution within any country you select thanks to our monthly Regional reports and our Facebook Page statistics section on our homepage. Just click on any Page you want and you will instantly discover its 5 most supportive countries on Facebook.

Argentina en FBook
Facebook Pages Now Ranked by Local Fans

Tip: Analytics PRO goes even further by listing the most Likes coming from up to 45 countries!

Facebook Pages Now Ranked by Local Fans

As you can see in the report below, we are now ranking Facebook brands and media by the number of their local fans. They are still accompanied by the number of their total fan base but now you can also see the volume of local fans Liking the Page in the selected country. It´s also expressed by a percentage from the total fan base so you can get the bigger picture. Leer más “December 2012 Social Media Report: Facebook Pages in Argentina | socialbakers.com”

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Blogging Innovation » What is an Innovation Culture?


by Roy Luebke

What is an Innovation Culture?Much has been written about what constitutes an innovation culture. Defining what that means may seem relatively simple, but is much more difficult to both define and achieve than one might think.

To begin the definition for an individual organization, start by understanding how the senior management team deals with ambiguity and risk. If an organization is extremely risk averse, it is unlikely to be very innovative. All companies deal with risk, there is risk in doing something, and there is risk in doing nothing. Risk is a part of being in business, and how the organization is prepared to manage risk is a leading factor in its ability to move into new competitive arenas.

The need to be innovative is derived from market pressures. The leadership team must feel a degree of angst about the future, or some paranoia about outside forces that makes them uncomfortable. Innovation is driven by the belief that a firm’s competitive advantage is fleeting and that it must always be reinventing itself in order to survive. Hubris is anathema to innovation.

An innovation culture requires advances in processes for discovery, experimentation, and developing portfolios of options. These new processes will, in fact help mitigate risk exposure as opportunities and solutions are better defined. Better definitions will reduce ambiguity and uncertainty.

Organizations require new process to research their customers and discover new patterns in customer attitudes, and market and technology evolutions. Firms need to create ways to recognize new, emerging patterns in key areas and develop new business concepts to meet these new realities. Business leaders need to allow their people to experiment more and develop prototypes that fail before going to market so that new innovations are more likely to succeed in the long term. Ultimately, new processes need to be developed to create deeper understanding about customers and deliver more of what customers want, even though customers are not likely to articulate these needs precisely.

Full article:
Blogging Innovation » What is an Innovation Culture?
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Innovation and Porter’s Five Forces


I’ve been pondering the “truths” we hold dear and wondering whether or not the mental models we were taught in college and graduate school hold up under the changes occurring in our economy.  Do the great business thinkers of the past twenty or thirty years and their models and descriptions hold true, especially when we introduce innovation into the mix?  Over the next few months I’ll look at a couple of the models we hold dear and place innovation within the context of the model, to see if the model is extensible enough to account for innovation, or whether we may want to revise our thinking to account for innovation.

First up:  Porter’s Five Forces.  Michael Porter wrote the book on corporate strategy.  Well, he actually wrote a number of books about corporate strategy, competitive advantage and a number of other topics.  The books that were mantras when I was in school were Competitive Strategy and Competitive Advantage.  In these books and others Porter introduced models, tools and methods to analyze the firm and its competitive position and its competitive advantage.  Two of these tools, the “Five Forces” model and the Value Chain model, are ones that have become ingrained in the way we think about businesses strategically.  What I wanted to know is:  does the model hold up in light of an increased emphasis on innovation?
Leer más “Innovation and Porter’s Five Forces”

Making the Leap to Disruptive Innovation

Does your organization struggle to innovate on a consistent basis? If so, you may want to get your customers involved.

Innovative companies have always intuitively understood the importance of customer feedback. But now there’s evidence that strongly suggests that direct customer involvement in the new product development process can make a real difference in your ability to innovate.

In a recent study published in the Journal of Product Innovation Management, researchers measured the benefits of user involvement in the product innovation process for future mobile phone services. The study rated three distinct user groups – ordinary users (customers), advanced users (technology and/or computer trained users) and professional product developers (from a leading European telephone company) – to determine their ability to generate ideas for innovative products.

Each group was measured in four areas: originality (newness of an idea), value (extent to which an idea solved a perceived problem), realization (ease of developing an idea into a commercial product), and total number of ideas.

The results may surprise you.


by Holly G. Green

Making the Leap to Disruptive InnovationDoes your organization struggle to innovate on a consistent basis? If so, you may want to get your customers involved.

Innovative companies have always intuitively understood the importance of customer feedback. But now there’s evidence that strongly suggests that direct customer involvement in the new product development process can make a real difference in your ability to innovate.

In a recent study published in the Journal of Product Innovation Management, researchers measured the benefits of user involvement in the product innovation process for future mobile phone services. The study rated three distinct user groups – ordinary users (customers), advanced users (technology and/or computer trained users) and professional product developers (from a leading European telephone company) – to determine their ability to generate ideas for innovative products.

Each group was measured in four areas: originality (newness of an idea), value (extent to which an idea solved a perceived problem), realization (ease of developing an idea into a commercial product), and total number of ideas.

The results may surprise you. Leer más “Making the Leap to Disruptive Innovation”

Is Dumb the New Smart?

by Mike Myatt

Is Dumb the New Smart?How dumb is your business? At the risk of drawing the ire of corporate elitists, I submit to you that the dumber your business is, the better off you are. The truth is that great companies are those which can thrive and prosper in the absence of sophistication. As odd as it sounds, businesses that are not dependent on smart talent, capital, or technology can scale faster and easier than those businesses burdened with the aforementioned dependencies. In today’s post I’ll share why I believe dumb is the new smart…

The simple truth of the matter is that if your business requires smart money (which equals expensive money), or your competitive advantage is tied to a superhero key employee, or your business is built around maintaining a technology advantage, you have more weakness in your business model than you do strengths.


by Mike Myatt

Is Dumb the New Smart?How dumb is your business? At the risk of drawing the ire of corporate elitists, I submit to you that the dumber your business is, the better off you are. The truth is that great companies are those which can thrive and prosper in the absence of sophistication. As odd as it sounds, businesses that are not dependent on smart talent, capital, or technology can scale faster and easier than those businesses burdened with the aforementioned dependencies. In today’s post I’ll share why I believe dumb is the new smart…

The simple truth of the matter is that if your business requires smart money (which equals expensive money), or your competitive advantage is tied to a superhero key employee, or your business is built around maintaining a technology advantage, you have more weakness in your business model than you do strengths. Leer más “Is Dumb the New Smart?”