The dirty secret to finding a Unique Selling Proposition for something that isn’t unique

♠ When you’re selling, finding a point of difference is essential. You have to set yourself apart in the minds of your ideal prospect as the only—or at least the best—choice. Typically, the basis for this differentiation is a strong unique selling proposition (USP).

Figuring out a USP can be pretty hard—because, bluntly, you usually aren’t unique in a way that your prospects care about. And you aren’t selling anything unique in a way they care about. Virtually no one is. So what do you do?

If you’re smart, you cheat. Not in a dishonest way. Just in a cunning way. Read on, and I’ll let you in on the dirty lil secret that makes finding a USP much easier.
The three ways in which you can differentiate yourself…>>


♠ When you’re selling, finding a point of difference is essential. You have to set yourself apart in the minds of your ideal prospect as the only—or at least the best—choice. Typically, the basis for this differentiation is a strong unique selling proposition (USP).

Figuring out a USP can be pretty hard—because, bluntly, you usually aren’t unique in a way that your prospects care about. And you aren’t selling anything unique in a way they care about. Virtually no one is. So what do you do?

If you’re smart, you cheat. Not in a dishonest way. Just in a cunning way. Read on, and I’ll let you in on the dirty lil secret that makes finding a USP much easier.

The three ways in which you can differentiate yourself…>> Leer más “The dirty secret to finding a Unique Selling Proposition for something that isn’t unique”

Stelios lines up travel brands to rival easyJet

Haji-Ioannou, who wholly owns easyGroup, launched easyJet in 1995, but now holds only a minority stake in the airline. He stands to profit if the judge rules that easyJet is prevented from entering other areas of the travel industry.

The entrepreneur has launched a digital and outdoor ad campaign to promote easyHolidays.co.uk, a yet-to-launch travel proposition that will go into direct competition with a similar service launched by easyJet in 2007.


Alex Brownsell

Sir Stelios Haji-Ioannou, chairman of easyGroup, plans to roll out a suite of “spoiler” travel products to take on easyJet, as his court case against the airline he founded reaches its climax.

Stelios Haji-Ioannou: in disupte with easyJet
Stelios Haji-Ioannou: in disupte with easyJet

Haji-Ioannou, who wholly owns easyGroup, launched easyJet in 1995, but now holds only a minority stake in the airline. He stands to profit if the judge rules that easyJet is prevented from entering other areas of the travel industry.

The entrepreneur has launched a digital and outdoor ad campaign to promote easyHolidays.co.uk, a yet-to-launch travel proposition that will go into direct competition with a similar service launched by easyJet in 2007. Leer más “Stelios lines up travel brands to rival easyJet”

Innovation Perspectives – A Common Purpose

This is the second of several ‘Innovation Perspectives‘ articles we will publish this week from multiple authors to get different perspectives on ‘How should firms collaborate with customers and/or value chain partners to co-create new products and services?’. Here is the next perspective in the series:

by Yann Cramer

Co-Creation Springs from a Sense of Common Purpose

Innovation Perspectives – A Common PurposeToo often the question of value extraction/retention is a dominant concern for all parties at too early a stage. For the sake of argument, let’s consider a supplier who has to develop a critical component for a customer who will integrate it in the design of a new finished product. The development process has not yet started that the customer plays its cards close to its chest with the conscious objective to retain as much of the value they will get from selling the finished product, and the supplier plays in a similar way with an equally conscious objective to extract as much value as possible from selling their component to the customer.

As a result, the supplier does not share unique knowledge for fear of losing leverage, the customer does not seek what could make the product unique for fear of tying itself to a particular supplier, and a great deal of time and effort is invested in crafting legal frameworks for knowledge sharing that anticipate on everything that could go wrong. But in reality, the biggest risk they run (without recognising it) is that while they position themselves for future negotiations some competitors will move faster and take the market.


This is the second of several ‘Innovation Perspectives‘ articles we will publish this week from multiple authors to get different perspectives on ‘How should firms collaborate with customers and/or value chain partners to co-create new products and services?’. Here is the next perspective in the series:

by Yann Cramer

Co-Creation Springs from a Sense of Common Purpose

Innovation Perspectives - A Common PurposeToo often the question of value extraction/retention is a dominant concern for all parties at too early a stage. For the sake of argument, let’s consider a supplier who has to develop a critical component for a customer who will integrate it in the design of a new finished product. The development process has not yet started that the customer plays its cards close to its chest with the conscious objective to retain as much of the value they will get from selling the finished product, and the supplier plays in a similar way with an equally conscious objective to extract as much value as possible from selling their component to the customer.

As a result, the supplier does not share unique knowledge for fear of losing leverage, the customer does not seek what could make the product unique for fear of tying itself to a particular supplier, and a great deal of time and effort is invested in crafting legal frameworks for knowledge sharing that anticipate on everything that could go wrong. But in reality, the biggest risk they run (without recognising it) is that while they position themselves for future negotiations some competitors will move faster and take the market. Leer más “Innovation Perspectives – A Common Purpose”

How to stay busy when you’re not

By Megan Byrne
The Sydney Morning Herald

Megan Byrne looks at how to stay busy when there’s seemingly nothing to do.

Most people have a quiet day at work now and then. But with businesses looking to cut costs wherever possible, you don’t want to appear idle for too long or you may find it’s your job on the chopping block. Don’t risk getting caught on Facebook or playing online sudoku activities that could potentially land you in hot water instead, use your time to improve your workplace, personal workspace, industry knowledge and career prospects.


By Megan Byrne
The Sydney Morning Herald

Megan Byrne looks at how to stay busy when there’s seemingly nothing to do.

Most people have a quiet day at work now and then. But with businesses looking to cut costs wherever possible, you don’t want to appear idle for too long or you may find it’s your job on the chopping block. Don’t risk getting caught on Facebook or playing online sudoku activities that could potentially land you in hot water instead, use your time to improve your workplace, personal workspace, industry knowledge and career prospects. Leer más “How to stay busy when you’re not”

Crowdsourcing Meets Communities: New Approach for Companies?


Recent Posts by Stefan Lindegaard

InnoCentive, Netflix Prize and Style Your Smart are just a few examples of crowdsourcing initiatives that pay cash prizes for selected or winning contributions. This seems to work just fine although you always have to find the right balance on what to offer for contributions. Some competitions only use very small cash prizes or just gifts such as iPods or clothing.

One example is the Tomorrow’s Urban Mobility Services contest held by the BMW Group. Here the prizes are not that great, but perhaps they believe that big, cash prizes will just attract many junk ideas. Perhaps they believe that quality input comes from people who care more about kudos and recognition than big cash rewards?

Personally, I think it is a question of striking a proper balance and finding out what works for your company and community. I am quite sure InnoCentive, Netflix and Daimler have learned a lot from their initiatives and that they constantly improve on striking this balance.

As I did some research on rewards and recognition, I found some great posts by Open Technologist. In one post, Crowdsourcing Example – People Participation In Crowdsourcing Platforms, they got into an interesting topic. Rewards do have to be direct; they can also also be indirect.

Open Technologist used the example of TopCoder, a software development house for outsourced projects that is different from its competitors as the work is crowdsourced to a community of over 240.000 members from over 200 countries in a competition format. Leer más “Crowdsourcing Meets Communities: New Approach for Companies?”