Brand. Productos. Imagen de marca. Conceptos. Corona, Absolut, Heineken, Coke, Pepsi, Johnnie Walker, Red Bull. Comparatives, share y bomus tracks!


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Branding : What colors in logos mean

When you think of Coke, it’s the red color that comes to your mind, right? Happiness, Radiance, Life and a set of emotions too comes along with it. Why? It’s the branding psychology.

Colors and shapes makes a huge impact on branding. And they always convey something unique to the user/viewer about the product. Here’s an experts explanation of what each color in logos and brands signifies.


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When you think of Coke, it’s the red color that comes to your mind, right? Happiness, Radiance, Life and a set of emotions too comes along with it. Why? It’s the branding psychology.

Colors and shapes makes a huge impact on branding. And they always convey something unique to the user/viewer about the product. Here’s an experts explanation of what each color in logos and brands signifies.

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Coke’s World Cup Song Is a Marketing Winner

Wavin’ the Flag has boosted sales and light-heartedly tied its brand to things young consumers care about—soccer and pop music

By Duane Stanford

Music industry executives have been making an unusual pilgrimage to Coca-Cola’s (KO) Atlanta headquarters, a telling measure of the company’s successful World Cup soccer marketing blitz. They want to learn how Coke turned a song called Wavin’ Flag by a little-known Somali-Canadian hip-hop artist into a World Cup anthem and No. 1 iTunes hit in 17 countries in less than a year. “They are getting on planes from New York, from U.K., from Los Angeles,” says Joe Belliotti, Coke’s director of global entertainment. “Word of mouth is a great thing in the music industry.”


Wavin’ the Flag has boosted sales and light-heartedly tied its brand to things young consumers care about—soccer and pop music

By Duane Stanford

Music industry executives have been making an unusual pilgrimage to Coca-Cola‘s (KO) Atlanta headquarters, a telling measure of the company’s successful World Cup soccer marketing blitz. They want to learn how Coke turned a song called Wavin’ Flag by a little-known Somali-Canadian hip-hop artist into a World Cup anthem and No. 1 iTunes hit in 17 countries in less than a year. “They are getting on planes from New York, from U.K., from Los Angeles,” says Joe Belliotti, Coke’s director of global entertainment. “Word of mouth is a great thing in the music industry.” Leer más “Coke’s World Cup Song Is a Marketing Winner”

COCA-COLA ELABORATES ON FANS-FIRST PHILOSOPHY


Here’s something worth perusing: “Coke’s ’Fans First’ Approach in Social Communities,” a Slideshare presentation by group director Michael Donnelly of worldwide interactive marketing.

We gave the 38-page piece a quick run-through and learned about everything from Coca-Cola’s “history of ’painting the town red’,” to how many Cokes are consumed a day, to the philosophy that its homepage isn’t just coke.com; it’s google.com. And Twitter.com. And YouTube.com. And hyves.nl. And … you get the idea.

What’s Coca-Cola learned from listening to buzz? That its brand doesn’t belong to the company; it belongs to those who talk about it. And Coke not only watches what kind of material its fans produce; it occasionally asks them to share experiences as well.

You’ll see numbers that demonstrate Coca-Cola got it right over the ’net, but there are also admissions about how its past approach — possibly the approach of many traditional brands — was wrong, and why. The so-called “less about us-more about them” mantle it’s taken up since is inspired by the insight that fans-first pays long-term relationship dividends — provided you don’t desert the people you’ve attracted the moment a campaign ends.

But don’t take our word for it; read for yourself:

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