“On Second Thought” Takes a Second Look at Our Thinking Process

Regardless of industry, experience or pay-grade, all of our work ultimately consists of a long series of decisions. The thinking process behind them involves either careful, deliberate calculation or the use of instincts, impulses, and “following your gut.” In the workplace, terms like “Jack-of-all-trades,” “wearing many hats” and “thinking on your feet” bring to mind images of multitasking, prioritizing and decisive action.

Which leaves us with a dilemma: ideally, you would have unlimited time and energy to carefully ponder every daily decision. But, realistically speaking, you’ll never have the resources to approach every challenge this way. Would you honestly eliminate dozens of choices one-by-one to find the perfect pre-interview lunch? Can you imagine picking out the perfect business attire by weighing the pros and cons of each and every outfit in your wardrobe?

The truth is, we have neither the time nor the mental focus to ponder every decision with pros and cons or the process of elimination. To save brainpower, you might choose a “lucky lunch” that experience has shown always seems to get you a second interview or callback. Similarly, to pick your business attire, you might assemble an outfit much like one that impressed you at the last meeting. There’s no true calculation behind these decisions; they’re based on a tangled combination of instinct, experience, correlation, opinion and nuance.


Peter North | //workawesome.com

“On Second Thought” Takes a Second Look at Our Thinking Process

Regardless of industry, experience or pay-grade, all of our work ultimately consists of a long series of decisions. The thinking process behind them involves either careful, deliberate calculation or the use of instincts, impulses, and “following your gut.” In the workplace, terms like “Jack-of-all-trades,” “wearing many hats” and “thinking on your feet” bring to mind images of multitasking, prioritizing and decisive action.

Which leaves us with a dilemma: ideally, you would have unlimited time and energy to carefully ponder every daily decision. But, realistically speaking, you’ll never have the resources to approach every challenge this way. Would you honestly eliminate dozens of choices one-by-one to find the perfect pre-interview lunch? Can you imagine picking out the perfect business attire by weighing the pros and cons of each and every outfit in your wardrobe?

The truth is, we have neither the time nor the mental focus to ponder every decision with pros and cons or the process of elimination. To save brainpower, you might choose a “lucky lunch” that experience has shown always seems to get you a second interview or callback. Similarly, to pick your business attire, you might assemble an outfit much like one that impressed you at the last meeting. There’s no true calculation behind these decisions; they’re based on a tangled combination of instinct, experience, correlation, opinion and nuance. Leer más ““On Second Thought” Takes a Second Look at Our Thinking Process”

How To Design Social Media Interfaces For The Irrational Human Mind

Jay Vidyarthi works as a user experience designer and research coordinator at Yu Centrik and will be talking in-depth about cognitive bias and user experience at the UX Masterclass on September 20th in Montreal.

Like any interactive system, social media depends largely on effective human-computer interfaces. In my day-to-day work as a user experience designer, I often use principles in psychology to help design interfaces which are easy to use and persuasive. I thought it might benefit the Social Times community to provide a clear example of how a strict psychological approach can provide new perspectives to the social media landscape. We’ll start with a summary of how psychology contributes to marketing and design, and we’ll move toward applying social psychology to a clearer understanding of how social media works (and how to _make_ social media work).

This may seem like a long article, but in order to make sure people from any background can understand, I wanted to start with the basics. [Más…]
UNDERSTANDING THE IRRATIONAL HUMAN MIND

When observing the world, making decisions and performing actions, people are rarely perfectly rational. Psychologists have shown that a wide range of factors can influence us our view of the world. As it turns out, we are much more complex than strict, logical robots.

For example, let’s imagine you’re heading to the mall because you need to buy a new mobile phone. If you went to one store which offered two phones, you would make a judgement on the differences and similarities between them. Interestingly, if you saw the exact same phones at different times (you didn’t have the opportunity to evaluate them simultaneously), you would actually tend to see more similarity between the two options. Obviously, this doesn’t make logical sense, the phones haven’t changed, so why should our perception of them change? As it turns out, psychologists have demonstrated that humans make this mistake consistently (known as “distinction bias”).


Posted by Guest

headlogo Jay Vidyarthi works as a user experience designer and research coordinator at Yu Centrik and will be talking in-depth about cognitive bias and user experience at the UX Masterclass on September 20th in Montreal.

Like any interactive system, social media depends largely on effective human-computer interfaces.  In my day-to-day work as a user experience designer, I often use principles in psychology to help design interfaces which are easy to use and persuasive.  I thought it might benefit the Social Times community to provide a clear example of how a strict psychological approach can provide new perspectives to the social media landscape.  We’ll start with a summary of how psychology contributes to marketing and design, and we’ll move toward applying social psychology to a clearer understanding of how social media works (and how to _make_ social media work).

This may seem like a long article, but in order to make sure people from any background can understand, I wanted to start with the basics. Leer más “How To Design Social Media Interfaces For The Irrational Human Mind”

Teams innovation – cognitive bias and over-optimism

por jabaldaia

Why design thinking is good for innovation?

According to Tim Brown “design thinking” is to participate in a dance of four mental states :

Divergence – Is the path to innovation, not an obstacle.

Convergence – It is time to eliminate options and make choices.

Analytical – Without analytical forms of thinking would not be possible to understand complex problems.

Synthetic – is the act of extracting meaningful patterns of the totality of information collected.

These four states are not presented in a logical and predetermined sequence. Here is the intuition that is privileged.

When this dance is performed carefully consider that design can help solve many problems, however, Alan Van Pelt says people are predisposed to cognitive bias and to be led by emotions which can contribute to bad decisions.

In other words, not minimizing these cognitive biases dance is like to trod the foot of your partner.

When we are prone to the pitfalls of decision making, when uncertainty is large, this is where design thinking is more useful.

Often what looks like a useful thing becomes an auxiliary of discomfort. The automotive industry is one example as shown Jeffrey Henning by pointing to research by observation as a key to innovation.

The issues highlighted here reveal not only the need for careful observation and allows an analogy not superficial, but also clearly reveal the existence of excess optimism and its consequences.

Being over-optimistic allows innovation to happen.

The delusional optimism makes us cling to ideas more than we should.


por jabaldaia

Why design thinking is good for innovation?

According to Tim Brown “design thinking” is to participate in a dance of four mental states :

Divergence – Is the path to innovation, not an obstacle.

Convergence – It is time to eliminate options and make choices.

Analytical – Without analytical forms of thinking would not be possible to understand complex problems.

Synthetic – is the act of extracting meaningful patterns of the totality of information collected.

These four states are not presented in a logical and predetermined sequence. Here is the intuition that is privileged.

When this dance is performed carefully consider that design can help solve many problems, however, Alan Van Pelt says people are predisposed to cognitive bias and to be led by emotions which can contribute to bad decisions.

In other words, not minimizing these cognitive biases dance is like to trod the foot of your partner.

When we are prone to the pitfalls of decision making, when uncertainty is large, this is where design thinking is more useful.

Often what looks like a useful thing becomes an auxiliary of discomfort. The automotive industry is one example as shown Jeffrey Henning by pointing to research by observation as a key to innovation.

The issues highlighted here reveal not only the need for careful observation and allows an analogy not superficial, but also clearly reveal the existence of excess optimism and its consequences.

Being over-optimistic allows innovation to happen.

The delusional optimism makes us cling to ideas more than we should. Leer más “Teams innovation – cognitive bias and over-optimism”

Frustrated at Work? Make a Case for Change

Have you ever sat at your desk, quietly cursing your boss for failing to understand your untapped creative gifts? Or maybe just biding your time until she intuits that life would be 1000% easier for you if the company had more interns? We are often guilty of waiting – particularly when it comes to innovating within our own job description or work culture. We expect our bosses and co-workers to intuit our needs. How could they NOT see that you are eminently qualified to helm the new project your company just landed? How could they NOT observe that your monitor is on the fritz and it’s killing your productivity? How could they NOT notice you’ve clearly outgrown your current position and are no longer challenged?



by Jocelyn K. Glei

Have you ever sat at your desk, quietly cursing your boss for failing to understand your untapped creative gifts? Or maybe just biding your time until she intuits that life would be 1000% easier for you if the company had more interns? We are often guilty of waiting – particularly when it comes to innovating within our own job description or work culture. We expect our bosses and co-workers to intuit our needs. How could they NOT see that you are eminently qualified to helm the new project your company just landed? How could they NOT observe that your monitor is on the fritz and it’s killing your productivity? How could they NOT notice you’ve clearly outgrown your current position and are no longer challenged? Leer más “Frustrated at Work? Make a Case for Change”