10.10.10 and 01.01.01 Good readings !!

And You Can read today 10/10/10:

Modernizers, preservationists and Innovation by Tim Kastelle

Adam Thierer wrote a terrific post today exploring his theme optimists and pessimists major ongoing Comparing Internet. Has he written a very interesting series of posts Assessing the arguments of the pessimists That Think That the impact of the Internet on society is Generally bad (eg Nick Carr, Andrew Keen, Jaron Lanier), and the optimists think That That the Internet is transformational , and positive (eg, Clay Shirky, Kevin Kelly, all the guys Cluetrain Manifesto).

How to fight the confirmation bias by Jorge Barba

Aha! you got an idea and you want to add the research to know if you’re idea has wings. You set up google alerts, hashtags on twitter about related topics, follow people in the know, join related groups on Linkedin, etc.. .. You know the drill!

The future of open innovation by Oliver Gassmann, Ellen Enkel & Henry Chesbrough via @ ralph_ohr

Institutional openness is becoming Increasingly popular in practice and academia: open innovation, open R & D, and open business models. This special issue builds on the concepts, underlying Assumptions and Implications discussed in two previous R & D Management Special Issue (2006, 2009).

The Power Of Storytelling by chrisbrogan via @ Ariegoldshlager

Storytelling is the most powerful way to put ideas into the world today.
-Robert McKee

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Por jabaldaia
http://abaldaia.wordpress.com/2010/10/10/10-10-10-and-01-01-01-good-readings/

In 01/01/2001

Welcome to the 2001 Weblog Awards™. I’m Nikolai Nolan, and I’ll be your host for this month.

The Bloggies ™ are publicly-chosen Weblog Awards Given to Those related to writers and weblogs in 30 categories. And not much more introduction is necessary. Here are the rules:

Best article or essay about weblogs

What the Hell Is a Weblog? And why leave me alone Will not They? By Derek M. Powazek

I fell in love with the web to long time in August It entered my bloodstream Like a virus, took root, and changed my life forever. And, Almost Immediately, the virus spread to HAD.

I made piles of homepages, the oldest of Which are lost forever in the digital ether. I did my college thesis online. I got a job in the biz. I started with lofty goals vague projects like “doing it right.” I cared too much.

And You Can read today 10/10/10:

Modernizers, preservationists and Innovation by Tim Kastelle

Adam Thierer wrote a terrific post today exploring his theme optimists and pessimists major ongoing Comparing Internet. Has he written a very interesting series of posts Assessing the arguments of the pessimists That Think That the impact of the Internet on society is Generally bad (eg Nick Carr, Andrew Keen, Jaron Lanier), and the optimists think That That the Internet is transformational , and positive (eg, Clay Shirky, Kevin Kelly, all the guys Cluetrain Manifesto).

How to fight the confirmation bias by Jorge Barba

Aha! you got an idea and you want to add the research to know if you’re idea has wings. You set up google alerts, hashtags on twitter about related topics, follow people in the know, join related groups on Linkedin, etc.. .. You know the drill!

The future of open innovation by Oliver Gassmann, Ellen Enkel & Henry Chesbrough via @ ralph_ohr

Institutional openness is becoming Increasingly popular in practice and academia: open innovation, open R & D, and open business models. This special issue builds on the concepts, underlying Assumptions and Implications discussed in two previous R & D Management Special Issue (2006, 2009).

The Power Of Storytelling by chrisbrogan via @ Ariegoldshlager

Storytelling is the most powerful way to put ideas into the world today.
-Robert McKee Leer más “10.10.10 and 01.01.01 Good readings !!”

Modernizers, Preservationists and Innovation | By Tim Kastelle & John Steen

In contrast, the Modernizers embrace dynamism:

Dynamism, by contrast, requires ongoing leaps of faith since we must continuously embrace, or at least accept, the fundamental uncertainty of social / technological change. I love the scene at the end of “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” [clip below] where Indy has to make the “leap of faith” and step out onto a walkway that doesn’t appear to be there at first. It’s a useful way of thinking about how we must sometimes approach life in the Digital Age.

Finally, he explains why he sides with the Modernizers:

It’s just amazing how fast disruptive innovation unfolds on the digital frontier. Again, no one knows what lies around the corner next. But if we were to adopt the “preservationist” mentality, we might never find out. We have to continue to be willing to take little leaps of faith each day. It’s vital that we embrace evolutionary dynamism and leave a broad sphere for continued experimentation by individuals and organizations alike…


By Tim Kastelle & John Steen
http://timkastelle.org/blog/2010/10/modernizers-preservationists-and-innovation/

Adam Therrier wrote a terrific post today exploring his ongoing major theme comparing internet optimists and pessimists. He has written a series of very interesting posts assessing the arguments of the pessimists that think that the impact of the internet on society is generally bad (e.g. Nick Carr, Andrew Keen, Jaron Lanier), and the optimists that think that the internet is transformational, and positive (e.g. Clay Shirky, Kevin Kelly, all the Cluetrain Manifesto guys).

In today’s post, Therrier quotes some ideas from Rob Atkinson, who builds on Virginia Postrel’s ideas about dynamism and stasis. He describes the Preservationists this way:

From their perspective, evolutionary dynamism is undesirable precisely because we can’t preserve some of the things which they feel made that previous era great. That something could be a specific form of culture, a particular set of institutions, or any number of other things. The key point is: The don’t like the fact the technology is fundamentally disruptive and that is dislodges old norms and institutions. What is familiar is more comforting than that which is unknown or uncertain. That’s the security blanket that the stasis / preservationist mentality provides. Leer más “Modernizers, Preservationists and Innovation | By Tim Kastelle & John Steen”

Social Media Reinvents Social Activism For Strong Relationships: My Critique Of Malcolm Gladwell’s New Yorker Article

Malcolm Gladwell in the New Yorker states that the new tools of social media have failed to reinvent social activism. He wrote a long piece explaining why he believes that relationships formed within social media are weak relationships, and used examples from the Greensboro sit-ins, and the crisis in Moldova and Iran to support his position.

He argued that without real commitment social activism cannot exist because there’s no real commitment to other individuals involved in a cause, and without that commitment in the face of the higher costs of getting involved people will drop out of a cause.

High Stakes Require Strong Relationships

Gladwell uses the sit-ins from Greensboro, NC as an example of social activism where high stakes were involved, people had to make strong commitments to the cause because the consequences of being involved were as high as physical danger and even death. And that those most involved in the sit-ins were supported by small networks of people who were connected through close relationships. Gladwell argues that because relationships formed online are loose relationships those relationships are not highly committed relationships, and any real requests for social action will fail because of the weak relationships formed within social media between people and organizations.

I agree with Gladwell, he was right, social media can be a medium where your ties to people are weak, but I also believe he misses an important factor with the use of social media. Most people have strong ties with a small group of friends, colleagues and family within their social networks. Those relationships are just as important today as they were in 1933 in the depths of the Great Depression, or in 1960 during the Greensboro sit-ins.


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Posted by John Cass | http://pr.typepad.com | © 2003-10 John Cass

Malcolm Gladwell in the New Yorker states that the new tools of social media have failed to reinvent social activism. He wrote a long piece explaining why he believes that relationships formed within social media are weak relationships, and used examples from the Greensboro sit-ins, and the crisis in Moldova and Iran to support his position.

He argued that without real commitment social activism cannot exist because there’s no real commitment to other individuals involved in a cause, and without that commitment in the face of the higher costs of getting involved people will drop out of a cause.

High Stakes Require Strong Relationships

Gladwell uses the sit-ins from Greensboro, NC as an example of social activism where high stakes were involved, people had to make strong commitments to the cause because the consequences of being involved were as high as physical danger and even death. And that those most involved in the sit-ins were supported by small networks of people who were connected through close relationships. Gladwell argues that because relationships formed online are loose relationships those relationships are not highly committed relationships, and any real requests for social action will fail because of the weak relationships formed within social media between people and organizations.

I agree with Gladwell, he was right, social media can be a medium where your ties to people are weak, but I also believe he misses an important factor with the use of social media. Most people have strong ties with a small group of friends, colleagues and family within their social networks. Those relationships are just as important today as they were in 1933 in the depths of the Great Depression, or in 1960 during the Greensboro sit-ins. Leer más “Social Media Reinvents Social Activism For Strong Relationships: My Critique Of Malcolm Gladwell’s New Yorker Article”