Mindfulness Helps You Become a Better Leader


See on Scoop.itGabriel Catalano human being | #INperfeccion® a way to find new insight & perspectives

To keep your equilibrium, practice meditation (or something like it) every day.

Ever since the financial crisis of 2008, I have sensed from many leaders that they want to do a better job of leading in accordance with their personal values. The crisis exposed the fallacies of measuring success in monetary terms and left many leaders with a deep feeling of unease that they were being pulled away from what I call their True North.

As markets rose and bonus pools grew, it was all too easy to celebrate the rising tide of wealth without examining the process that created it. Too many leaders placed self-interest ahead of their organizations’ interests, and ended up disappointing the customers, employees, and shareholders who had trusted them. I often advise emerging leaders, “You know you’re in trouble when you start to judge your self-worth by your net worth.” Nevertheless, many leaders get caught up in this game without realizing it.

This happened to me in 1988, when I was an executive vice president at Honeywell, en route to the top. By external standards I was highly successful, but inside I was deeply unhappy. I had begun to focus too much on impressing other people and positioning myself to become CEO. I was caught up with external measures of success instead of looking inward to measure my success as a human and a leader. I was losing my way. Leer más “Mindfulness Helps You Become a Better Leader”

Lectura del mes: “El ADN del innovador” | sadecreapolisblog.com


 

Inspiring readings

Jeff H.DyerHal B.Gregersen y Clayton M.Christensen han publicado el libro “The innovator’s DNA” (“El ADN del innovador”). El libró apareció como resultado de la curiosidad de Dyer y Gregersen que plantearon la pregunta siguiente a Christensen: ¿De dónde vienen las innovaciones disruptivas? A partir de este momento Christensen decidió empezar un proceso de investigación que duró ocho años y que les permitió observar y entender el comportamiento de las personas innovadoras. Christensen como coordinador del proyecto y con la ayuda de sus dos colegas recopilaron datos de 500 innovadores y más de 5.000 ejecutivos en 75 países distintos; algunos más famosos que otros como por ejemplo los fundadores de AmazonAppleGoogleSkype y el grupo Virgin, y otros no tan conocidos.

El libro se estructura en dos partes, la primera titulada “La innovación disruptiva empieza por ti” en la que se dedican cinco capítulos a cada una de las habilidades que caracterizan el perfil del empresario o directivo innovador:Asociación, Cuestionamiento, Observación, Networking o creación de redes y Experimentación.  Y la segunda parte es “El ADN de las organizaciones y los equipos disruptivos”, en la que se dedica un capítulo a explicar el ADN de las empresas más innovadoras del mundo y tres capítulos prácticos que permiten al lector poner en práctica el ADN del innovador, centrándose en las personas, los procesos y los principios rectores, es decir, la filosofía. Leer más “Lectura del mes: “El ADN del innovador” | sadecreapolisblog.com”

The Rules of Randomness & How You Can Stand Apart – http://99u.com


99U
by Frans Johansson
http://99u.com

The world is an unpredictable place. Everyone seems to agree with this statement. We all recognize that unpredictable things happen every day, from a chance conversation to an unexpected meeting; from the rapid rise of an Instagram to the dramatic fall of a Lehman Brothers. We don’t question random forces in our personal lives or the world around us. But what about in our careers or in business? Why don’t we account for unpredictability in these areas?

Let me start with a personal example: In 2004, I was waiting for the publication of my first book, The Medici Effect. I was nervous, hopeful and relieved to finally be done with a three-year obsession—an investigation into how groundbreaking innovation happens at the ‘intersection’ of different industries, cultures and disciplines.  But the timing couldn’t have been worse. Clayton Christensen’s book,Seeing What’s Next, was also coming out the same month, from the same publisher.Soon, I was knocking on the doors of Innovation Officers and strategy leaders at companies to ‘consult’ on innovation and maybe give a talk or two. Turns out, it was a bad plan. Everyone else, some better known than me—including Christensen—were doing the same thing.

One evening, my then-fiancée came home and announced that her boss at JP Morgan had tasked her to find a “business case for diversity.” As we discussed this, it became clear that my book—my ideas about the “Medici Effect”—fit the bill. Within a week, I was presenting to the head of the investment side of JP Morgan Chase.

I share this story because it was the moment when everything “clicked” for me. My entire strategy for a “brilliant career as an innovation though leader” had just been obliterated. Never in all my planning and careful analysis did I ever consider that the answer would lie in the Diversity Office, rather than Innovation. After embracing this possibility, everything changed—so much so, that I finally found the time to focus on finding out whether the success of other individuals and companies all hinged on a similar “click moment” as it did for me.

The answer is simply, yes. From Starbucks to Microsoft Windows to Diane von Furstenburg to Twilight, and its ‘inspired’ Fifty Shades of Grey.

The world is unpredictable, and that means we cannot foresee whether an idea or project will turn out as planned. In fact, the plan may very well become outdated before we even start to execute it. And if we can’t logically plan our way to success, then it must mean that success, when it happens, is a result of something unexpected—of something random. It is a revealing paradox.

The world is unpredictable, and that means we cannot foresee whether an idea or project will turn out as planned.

If Howard Schultz had never taken a stroll down a street in Milan and wandered into a café, Starbucks as we know it would probably never have happened. If Murray Sargent and Dave Weise hadn’t happened to meet at a party on the Microsoft campus one night, the operating system we know as Windows would have been killed off—and most likely the PC revolution would not have happened as quickly, if at all.

Yet, we resist this notion. We want to explain away success as being more than just good fortune or luck. Indeed, very few people I talked to had spent much time thinking deeply about how to incorporate randomness into their corporate or professional strategy. The reason seemed obvious: randomness defines the part of our lives that we can’t control, so how can we rely on it?

Simply put, randomness makes us stand apart. In The Click Moment, I talk about a number of different approaches for using randomness to our advantage. Here are a few of them:

1. Increase the number of click moments in our lives. This is a lot easier than we think. Most of us, by nature, are creatures of habit. We like the familiar and avoid placing ourselves in uncomfortable positions. In a crowded room, we tend to gravitate toward the people we know, rather than striking up a conversation with a stranger. And we become so immersed in a certain path—or the momentum has driven us so far down it—that we’re unwilling to question or take our eyes off it.

Instead, change up your routine. Go to a different café. Read a magazine you otherwise never would. Talk to someone in the elevator, on the plane, or in the park—and go beyond the weather and your busy schedules. Surround yourself with people who are different from you, be it their backgrounds, their professions, their cultures. Embrace that diversity.

Randomness defines the part of our lives that we can’t control, so how can we rely on it?

2. Reject the obvious path. If we do what’s logical—take the path that everyone ‘knows’ to do—we will do exactly what someone else is doing, and never stand apart. My friend Marcus Samuelsson, food activist, restaurateur, and chef-owner of Red Rooster, recounted to me how he came to be the guest chef for the White House’s state dinner for the Indian Prime Minister Mammohan Singh.

Every state dinner since 1874 has featured French-American cuisine. The White House invited 15 elite chefs, including Marcus, to present a menu for the dinner. Everyone presented a French-American menu with a meat dish, save Marcus. Knowing Prime Minister Singh is vegetarian, he presented a vegetarian menu inspired by Indian flavors. He was selected as the guest chef, and the White House broke its French-American state dinner tradition.

3. Make lots of bets—but purposefully.  Leer más “The Rules of Randomness & How You Can Stand Apart – http://99u.com”

End of Year Innovation Questions

As you may have already guessed, John and I are mentally wiped out right now and are taking a short break from blogging. We’re saving up ideas and posts and will be ready to go again once the new year starts.

In the meantime, here are a few questions to consider. If you’d like to answer them in the comments, it would be fun to have a discussion on these issues:

1. What’s the most innovative thing you’ve done this year?
2. What will you do next year to build on this year’s success?
3. What is your greatest innovation challenge right now?


Thnxs to Tim Kastelle & John Steen | Innovation Leadership Network
http://timkastelle.org

As you may have already guessed, John and I are mentally wiped out right now and are taking a short break from blogging. We’re saving up ideas and posts and will be ready to go again once the new year starts.

In the meantime, here are a few questions to consider. If you’d like to answer them in the comments, it would be fun to have a discussion on these issues:

  1. What’s the most innovative thing you’ve done this year?
  2. What will you do next year to build on this year’s success?
  3. What is your greatest innovation challenge right now? Leer más “End of Year Innovation Questions”