Questions No One Knows the Answers to (Full Version) – Chris Anderson


TEDEducation

In the first of a new TED-Ed series designed to catalyze curiosity, TED Curator Chris Anderson shares his boyhood obsession with quirky questions that seem to have no answers.

“Questions No One Knows the Answers to” was animated by Andrew Park (http://www.cognitivemedia.co.uk)

View the full lessons:
http://ed.ted.com/lessons/questions-no-one-knows-the-answers-to
http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-many-universes-are-there
http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-can-t-we-see-evidence-of-alien-life

Cómo utilizar el modelo Freemium (y no ir a la quiebra)


Hace un tiempo, los modelos de negocio freemium eran la moda- es decir, regalar una parte de tus servicios en línea mientras cargas un pequeño porcentaje a los clientes por las versiones premium. A este tipo de empresas como LinkedIn, Dropbox y Skype parecía irles bien. El editor de Wired Chris Anderson publicó el libro definitivo sobre el modelo freemium en 2009.

Avanzando rápidamente hasta el 2012, algunas empresas se quedaron atrapadas con “costos de operación muy altos y miles de aprovechadores (freeloaders)”, como señala The Wall Street Journal. Una compañía llamada Chargify, ofrecía un software de gestión de facturas… Leer más “Cómo utilizar el modelo Freemium (y no ir a la quiebra)”

TED: “If Advertising Is So Great, Why The Hell Is It Largely Failing On The Web?”

TED is inspiring advertisers to go above and beyond with their video marketing campaigns with the Ads Worth Spreading Challenge. The challenge, which was announced yesterday on the TED blog, is inviting advertisers to “reinvent, inspire and engage audiences” by redefining video advertising. In his Ad Week address, TED’s curator Chris Anderson said, “If advertising is so great, why the hell is it largely failing on the web today?” Advertisers—TED is asking you to prove Anderson wrong by submitting the best video marketing campaigns you can muster up!

Advertisers, brands and anyone else in the business community are invited to submit their inspirational, creative and amazing video ad campaigns by January 10, 2011. The ten best campaigns will be selected by a panel of judges (not yet announced) and will be premiered at TED2011 and will also appear on TED.com. That’s quite a way to start of an online video campaign, don’t you think?


TED is inspiring advertisers to go above and beyond with their video marketing campaigns with the Ads Worth Spreading Challenge.  The challenge, which was announced yesterday on the TED blog, is inviting advertisers to “reinvent, inspire and engage audiences” by redefining video advertising.  In his Ad Week address, TED’s curator Chris Anderson said, “If advertising is so great, why the hell is it largely failing on the web today?”  Advertisers—TED is asking you to prove Anderson wrong by submitting the best video marketing campaigns you can muster up!

Advertisers, brands and anyone else in the business community are invited to submit their inspirational, creative and amazing video ad campaigns by January 10, 2011.  The ten best campaigns will be selected by a panel of judges (not yet announced) and will be premiered at TED2011 and will also appear on TED.com.  That’s quite a way to start of an online video campaign, don’t you think? Leer más “TED: “If Advertising Is So Great, Why The Hell Is It Largely Failing On The Web?””

The End Of Free Media?

“We believe that serious media organizations must start to collect additional revenue from their readers … information is less and less yearning to be free.”

On the surface, this is worth exploring … after all, what media executive in their right mind would predict that people actually WANT to pay for media? Especially in an era where Chris Anderson famously declared in his Wired article and book that “the rise of “freeconomics” is being driven by the underlying technologies that power the Web.” Seeing information or even entertainment as bits and bytes of information, however, is too narrow of a view. When someone buys the NY Times or a magazine or a DVD -they are not only paying for the media itself, but rather the experience it offers them.


by Rohit Bhargavaimb_free_chrisanderson

What media would you actually pay to consume? That fundamental question is the most profound one driving all the discussion today about the future of media. Some believe the iPad and mobile tablet devices will reinvent how we read and consume media. Others feel this is just the latest in the overhyped and wholly exaggerated claims that old media is dying. At the recent International Newsroom Summit, The New York Timespublisher and chairman Arthur Sulzberger, Jr. stated that he eventually expects that The NY Times will no longer be a physical newspaper.

While he declined to forecast a date when this might happen, his words are being seen by many as a prediction of the inevitable demise of the printed word. Another statement in his talk has received less attention, but perhaps may demonstrate a much more profound realization about the future of media:

“We believe that serious media organizations must start to collect additional revenue from their readers … information is less and less yearning to be free.”

On the surface, this is worth exploring … after all, what media executive in their right mind would predict that people actually WANT to pay for media? Especially in an era where Chris Anderson famously declared in his Wired article and book that “the rise of “freeconomics” is being driven by the underlying technologies that power the Web.”  Seeing information or even entertainment as bits and bytes of information, however, is too narrow of a view. When someone buys the NY Times or a magazine or a DVD -they are not only paying for the media itself, but rather the experience it offers them. Leer más “The End Of Free Media?”

How TED Connects the Idea-Hungry Elite

Inside the World’s MOST EXCLUSIVE (and Most Accessible) CLUB with SPECIAL GUESTS including

Elizabeth Gilbert • Richard Branson • Jamie Oliver • Malcolm Gladwell • Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala • Barry Schwartz • Ken Robinson • Sarah Silverman • Bill Clinton • David Byrne • Bill Gates • Craig VenterJill • Bolte Taylor • Dave Eggers • Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy • Sunitha Krishnan • Tony Robbins • Julia Sweeney • Isabel Allende • E.O. Wilson • and the chief himself, Chris Anderson!

The other day, I got an email from a new friend. The subject line read “Are you a TED talk person?”
It linked to an 18-minute video of MIT behavioral economist Dan Ariely talking about the bugs in our moral codes. Other friends have sent me videos of Eat, Pray, Love author Elizabeth Gilbert on the spiritual dimension of creativity; rocker David Byrne on how venue architecture affects musical expression; and UC Berkeley professor Robert Full’s insights into how geckos’ feet stick to a wall.

Each of these emails is like a membership card into the club of “TED talk people.” I love being a member of this club. The videos give my discovery-seeking brain a little hit of dopamine in the middle of the workday. But just as important, each one I see or recommend makes me part of a group of millions of folks around the world who have checked out these videos. What links us is our desire to learn; TEDsters feel part of a curious, engaged, enlightened, and tech-savvy tribe.


By: Anya Kamenetz

Photograph Courtesy of TED, by Marla Aufmuth, James Duncan Davidson, Andrew Heavens, Robert Leslie, Asa Mathat

TED, Speakers, Video, Bill Gates, Richard Branson

Chris Anderson: The entrepreneur bought TED in 2001. “It felt like something you could devote your life to,” he says.


Related Content

Inside the World’s MOST EXCLUSIVE (and Most Accessible) CLUB with SPECIAL GUESTS including

Elizabeth Gilbert • Richard Branson • Jamie Oliver • Malcolm Gladwell • Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala • Barry Schwartz • Ken Robinson • Sarah Silverman • Bill Clinton • David Byrne • Bill Gates • Craig VenterJill • Bolte Taylor • Dave Eggers • Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy • Sunitha Krishnan • Tony Robbins • Julia Sweeney • Isabel Allende • E.O. Wilson • and the chief himself, Chris Anderson!

The other day, I got an email from a new friend. The subject line read “Are you a TED talk person?”
It linked to an 18-minute video of MIT behavioral economist Dan Ariely talking about the bugs in our moral codes. Other friends have sent me videos of Eat, Pray, Love author Elizabeth Gilbert on the spiritual dimension of creativity; rocker David Byrne on how venue architecture affects musical expression; and UC Berkeley professor Robert Full’s insights into how geckos’ feet stick to a wall.

Each of these emails is like a membership card into the club of “TED talk people.” I love being a member of this club. The videos give my discovery-seeking brain a little hit of dopamine in the middle of the workday. But just as important, each one I see or recommend makes me part of a group of millions of folks around the world who have checked out these videos. What links us is our desire to learn; TEDsters feel part of a curious, engaged, enlightened, and tech-savvy tribe. Leer más “How TED Connects the Idea-Hungry Elite”

The Tragic Death of Practically Everything

Microsoft, Firefox, Facebook, the Mac–they live on in our hearts.

Harry McCracken

Wired Editor in Chief Chris Anderson is catching flack for the magazine’s current cover story, which declares that the Web is dead. I’m not sure what the controversy is. For years, once-vibrant technologies, products, and companies have been dropping like teenagers in a Freddy Krueger movie. Thank heavens that tech journalists have done such a good job of documenting the carnage as it happened. Without their diligent reporting, we might not be aware that the industry is pretty much an unrelenting bloodbath.

Here’s a moving recap of some of the stuff that predeceased the Web. Warning: You may need a handkerchief.

Internet Explorer, as you’ll recall, died in 2004.


Microsoft, Firefox, Facebook, the Mac–they live on in our hearts.

Harry McCracken

Wired Editor in Chief Chris Anderson is catching flack for the magazine’s current cover story, which declares that the Web is dead. I’m not sure what the controversy is. For years, once-vibrant technologies, products, and companies have been dropping like teenagers in a Freddy Krueger movie. Thank heavens that tech journalists have done such a good job of documenting the carnage as it happened. Without their diligent reporting, we might not be aware that the industry is pretty much an unrelenting bloodbath.

Here’s a moving recap of some of the stuff that predeceased the Web. Warning: You may need a handkerchief.

Internet Explorer, as you’ll recall, died in 2004.

In 2005, the Macintosh suffered a trauma which inevitably led to its death earlier this year.

Linux absolutely, positively died in 2006.

Leer más “The Tragic Death of Practically Everything”

Is the Web Dying? It Doesn’t Look That Way

ired The chart accompanying the Wired article shows Web traffic shrinking — as a proportion of total Internet traffic.

Wired graphic

Is the Web dead?

Chris Anderson, Wired magazine’s editor in chief, says the Web is being crippled by a world of apps and screens in a cover story titled “The Web Is Dead. Long Live the Internet.”

Mr. Anderson argues that a world of downloadable apps, which work through the Internet and arrive through gadgets like the iPhone or Xbox, are quickly cannibalizing the World Wide Web as consumers prefer buttoned-up, dedicated platforms, designed specifically for mobile screens.

Is he right? Should we plaster R.I.P. signs all over the Web? Not exactly.


By NICK BILTON

Wired The chart accompanying the Wired article shows Web traffic shrinking — as a proportion of total Internet traffic.

Wired graphic

Is the Web dead?

Chris Anderson, Wired magazine’s editor in chief, says the Web is being crippled by a world of apps and screens in a cover story titled “The Web Is Dead. Long Live the Internet.”

Mr. Anderson argues that a world of downloadable apps, which work through the Internet and arrive through gadgets like the iPhone or Xbox, are quickly cannibalizing the World Wide Web as consumers prefer buttoned-up, dedicated platforms, designed specifically for mobile screens.

Is he right? Should we plaster R.I.P. signs all over the Web? Not exactly. Leer más “Is the Web Dying? It Doesn’t Look That Way”