5 Types Of Facebook Updates To Avoid | Written by Jeff Bullas


jeffbullas.com

As you might have noticed I am a firm believer in the power of social media, maybe even verging on evangelical. It’s existence has been brief  in the universal timeframe, so there have been no instructions handed down from ‘on high’ on 5 Types Of Facebook Updates To Avoidhow to best interact and play with this shiny new toy.

Governments have banned Facebook and Twitter, and some sovereign powers and groups even want to censor the ‘Net”.

We certainly didn’t receive instruction from our parents on the ‘Do’s and Dont’s’ of Facebook and that we should not be Facebooking while driving or after a relationship breakup.. you might find that engaging the brain before opening that status update box and emotionally typing could be the worst thing you have done in a long time.

We are still just working out that texting while drunk is not a healthy activity and sending  messages of ‘heartfelt honesty’ to your boss while inebriated during moments of  ‘Beer Goggle’ clarity at 2am on a Saturday night  is very likely to find you with a very clean desk on Monday morning.

There is no formal curriculum in high school on the moral issues of Facebook updates or what you should post on Twitter.

I have heard that the commandments on how often you should tweet are hidden in some secret vault in Siberia that only will be revealed when the time is right. In fact I and many others, I am sure, have been told  that we tweet to much. By the way, I have not yet told anyone that they don’t tweet enough.

So what are some of the types of updates and situations where we should be refraining rather than participating.

1. Incidental Happenings

This has to be one of the 7 wonders of  world that we as a species are prone to shout out and pronounce on Twitter or Facebook …  ‘just clipped my nails’ or ‘found a grey hair where it shouldn’t be’.

We don’t walk into the office and shout  out ‘I can’t believe it… I left a tissue in the washing last night’ unless you are looking for a demotion or some extended unexpected leave, maybe evolution is reversing and we are about to become extinct if we keep up this random behaviour. Charles Darwin would most probably roll over in his grave at Westminster Abbey if he heard about this latest update to the ‘Origin of the Species

2. Inspirational Wisdom… Leer más “5 Types Of Facebook Updates To Avoid | Written by Jeff Bullas”

Gestione el cambio organizacional con los 6 niveles lógicos de pensamiento


Via Scoop.ithuman being in – perfección

Signature of Charles Darwin.

“Las especies que sobreviven no son las más fuertes, ni las más rápidas, ni las más inteligentes; sino aquellas que se adaptan mejor al cambio”. Charles Darwin

Entorno: Se refiere a los espacios físicos y a las personas con las que entramos en contacto. Responde a las preguntas ¿Cómo? Y ¿Cuándo?
Conducta: Son las acciones especificas que se llevan a cabo y responde a la pregunta ¿Qué?
Capacidad: Son las habilidades, estrategias o aptitudes y responde a ¿Cómo? ¿Qué pasará cuando sepa o haya aprendido?
Creencias y valores: Se refiere a las generalizaciones sobre aspectos importantes que guían nuestra conducta, son ideas que son consideradas verdaderas y responde a ¿Por qué? ¿Qué es importante? Leer más “Gestione el cambio organizacional con los 6 niveles lógicos de pensamiento”

The Evolution of The Blogger


http://www.flowtown.com

by Ethan Bloch on Dec 1, 2010
101201-FLOW-BLOGGER(2)

In the dark ages of the early 1990s, internet users sought to make their stamp on internet history by forging a new type of voyeurism and narcissism. In 1994 the blog was born, and since then, human interaction has never been the same.

Read more: http://www.flowtown.com/blog/the-evolution-of-the-blogger#ixzz16xI1jP2V

Evolution of Websites: A Darwinian Tale

The web is constantly evolving. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to see how quickly new technologies are being adopted and how fragile design trends are. While the web is still an infant relative to other mediums such as print, TV and radio, and still has fair amount of growing up to do, it has already amassed a rich history. Let’s take a look at how the medium has evolved throughout the years.

A Matter of Carbon Dating

Evolution is inevitable. As British philosopher Herbert Spencer put it — inspired by Charles Darwin’s theory on natural selection — it’s “survival of the fittest.”

If we examine any aspect of web design, we can see that trends and technologies being discarded, improved on, or superseded by something better is common. Evolve or die, pick one of the two options. And if we delve deeper, we can see three core elements that dictate this natural selection and evolution.


by Alexander Dawson | http://sixrevisions.com/web-technology/evolution-of-websites-a-darwinian-tale/

 

Evolution of Websites: A Darwinian Tale

The web is constantly evolving. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to see how quickly new technologies are being adopted and how fragile design trends are. While the web is still an infant relative to other mediums such as print, TV and radio, and still has fair amount of growing up to do, it has already amassed a rich history. Let’s take a look at how the medium has evolved throughout the years.

 

A Matter of Carbon Dating

Evolution is inevitable. As British philosopher Herbert Spencer put it — inspired by Charles Darwin’s theory on natural selection — it’s “survival of the fittest.”

If we examine any aspect of web design, we can see that trends and technologies being discarded, improved on, or superseded by something better is common. Evolve or die, pick one of the two options. And if we delve deeper, we can see three core elements that dictate this natural selection and evolution.

A Matter of Carbon Dating

 

Certain web browsers tend to be more evolved than others!

Code

One of the core elements of the web is code. As web designers and web developers, the success of a particular language largely depends on how much value it brings to our work. I’m sure only a handful of you remember VRML with the fondness of the concept that we could soon be browsing the web using the same virtual reality as used in the movie Tron. Alas, virtual reality didn’t take off.

A Matter of Carbon Dating

 

The idea of virtual reality and 3D objects fascinated developers. Leer más “Evolution of Websites: A Darwinian Tale”

Importance of Social Networks and Idea Execution

The first reason is that Darwin’s network was much, much better than Wallace’s. Darwin was friends with Hooker, Lyell and Huxley. It was Hooker and Huxley that arranged the joint presentation of Darwin’s and Wallace’s papers to the Linnean Society after Wallace submitted his before Darwin was ready to publish The Origin of Species. One of the reasons that Darwin became synonymous with natural selection is that he had pre-existing strong relationships with the people that needed to use and write about the theory. The modern lesson is that your network connections are critically important. When you try to get your ideas to spread, it helps tremendously if you are well-connected within the network of people that can use your idea (and this is true whether your idea is a product, a service, a way of doing things, or a theory).


by Tim Kastelle

Importance of Social Networks and Idea ExecutionI’ve always been a fan of Charles Darwin. I think that he was a great scientist – a careful observer and deep thinker. But I still agree with many of Richard Lewontin’s points from his article about Darwin in the New York Review of Books. The main point that Lewontin makes in the first half of the article is that much of the Darwin fetishism these days is out of proportion to the quality of Darwin’s work. In particular, he tries to move away from the great man theory of science. In doing so, Lewontin cites Alfred Russel Wallace’s simultaneous publication of a theory of natural selection, and the dependence of both theories on a hereditary mechanism as developed by Mendel. So instead of talking about Darwinian evolution, Lewontin maintains that we should be discussing Darwinian-Wallacian-Mendelian evolution.

Fair enough – we probably should be doing exactly that. Or we should be calling it the modern synthesis to recognise the great genetics-based development of evolutionary theory in the 20th century. So why do we still often talk about Darwinism? Darwin and Wallace first published their pieces on natural selection at the same time – they essentially had the same idea. Why did Darwin’s version have the greater impact? I have two reasons for this, and both are important for modern innovators to understand. Leer más “Importance of Social Networks and Idea Execution”

Evolutionary Innovation

One of the big mistakes that smart people commonly make is to think that a great idea sells itself. If this were true, innovation would be fairly simple – just come up with great ideas. Unfortunately, it’s not so easy. Innovation is actually a process – you need to generate great ideas, you need to select the best ones and figure out how to execute them, and you have to get these executed ideas to spread.

These three steps are variety, selection and replication – that’s an evolutionary process. In fact, the history of the idea of evolution through natural selection provides a good lesson in how innovation is more than just coming up with great ideas.

We think of evolution by natural selection as Charles Darwin’s idea. However, the first public disclosure of Darwin’s big idea happened at a meeting of the Linnean Society in 1858 – and at that meeting two papers on evolution by natural selection were read. One was written by Darwin, and the other was written by Alfred Russell Wallace. One of the most powerful ideas of the past 200 years was developed nearly simultaneously by two people. And the initial impact of this great idea was, well, nothing.


Posted by TimothyKastelle

One of the big mistakes that smart people commonly make is to think that a great idea sells itself. If this were true, innovation would be fairly simple – just come up with great ideas. Unfortunately, it’s not so easy. Innovation is actually a process – you need to generate great ideas…

One of the big mistakes that smart people commonly make is to think that a great idea sells itself. If this were true, innovation would be fairly simple – just come up with great ideas. Unfortunately, it’s not so easy. Innovation is actually a process – you need to generate great ideas, you need to select the best ones and figure out how to execute them, and you have to get these executed ideas to spread.

These three steps are variety, selection and replication – that’s an evolutionary process. In fact, the history of the idea of evolution through natural selection provides a good lesson in how innovation is more than just coming up with great ideas.

We think of evolution by natural selection as Charles Darwin’s idea. However, the first public disclosure of Darwin’s big idea happened at a meeting of the Linnean Society in 1858 – and at that meeting two papers on evolution by natural selection were read. One was written by Darwin, and the other was written by Alfred Russell Wallace. One of the most powerful ideas of the past 200 years was developed nearly simultaneously by two people. And the initial impact of this great idea was, well, nothing. Leer más “Evolutionary Innovation”

CONTAGIOUS / USA

Our New York team is growing. Noelle Weaver, Contagious’ new Business Development Director, North America, shares thoughts on her vision for Contagious and the US advertising industry.

Contagious is happy to welcome Noelle Weaver, the latest addition to our team in New York.

Noelle is fresh from a 15 year career in business development, helping agencies including JWT Chicago, Publicis in New York, Euro RSCG and SS+K brand, market, and strategically grow their business and corporate reputations. Most recently Noelle was director of sales and marketing at CAA’s youth research and trends analysis firm, The Intelligence Group.

What excites you about Contagious?

I grew up wanting to be a writer. In 1989 I opened up an issue of Cosmopolitan and inside was the first Nike women’s campaign that was done by Wieden+Kennedy’s Janet Champ and Charlotte Moore. In that instant I knew I wanted to work in advertising. I wanted to create the same type of images and messages that moved people and made them think about the world around them: how the world was changing, how the world should be changed, and most importantly, how all of it together was changing us as people.


Our New York team is growing. Noelle Weaver, Contagious’ new Business Development Director, North America, shares thoughts on her vision for Contagious and the US advertising industry.

Contagious is happy to welcome Noelle Weaver, the latest addition to our team in New York.

Noelle is fresh from a 15 year career in business development, helping agencies including JWT Chicago, Publicis in New York, Euro RSCG and SS+K brand, market, and strategically grow their business and corporate reputations. Most recently Noelle was director of sales and marketing at CAA’s youth research and trends analysis firm, The Intelligence Group.

What excites you about Contagious?

I grew up wanting to be a writer. In 1989 I opened up an issue of Cosmopolitan and inside was the first Nike women’s campaign that was done by Wieden+Kennedy’s Janet Champ and Charlotte Moore. In that instant I knew I wanted to work in advertising. I wanted to create the same type of images and messages that moved people and made them think about the world around them: how the world was changing, how the world should be changed, and most importantly, how all of it together was changing us as people. Leer más “CONTAGIOUS / USA”