The Bias Against Creatives as Leaders | 99u.com


 

Illustration: Oscar Ramos Orozco

Two candidates are being interviewed for a leadership position in your company. Both have strong resumes, but while one seems to be bursting with new and daring ideas, the other comes across as decidedly less creative (though clearly still a smart cookie). Who gets the job?

The answer, unfortunately, is usually the less creative candidate. This fact may or may not surprise you – you yourself may have been the creative candidate who got the shaft. But what you’re probably wondering is, why?

by Heidi Grant Halvorson

After all, it’s quite clear who should be getting the job. Studies show that leaders who are more creative are in fact better able to effect positive change in their organizations, and are better at inspiring others to follow their lead.

And yet, according to recent research there is good reason to believe that the people with the most creativity aren’t given the opportunity to lead, because of a process that occurs (on a completely unconscious level) in the mind of everyone who has ever evaluated an applicant for a leadership position.

The problem, put simply, is this: our idea of what a prototypical “creative person” is like is completely at odds with our idea of a prototypical “effective leader.”  Leer más “The Bias Against Creatives as Leaders | 99u.com”

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10 Crazy Job Interview Mistakes People Actually Made

· On the way to the interview, the candidate passed, cut off and flipped his middle finger at a driver who happened to be the interviewer.

· The candidate took off his shoes during the interview.

· The candidate asked for a sip of the interviewer’s coffee.

· When a candidate interviewing for a security position wasn’t hired on the spot, he painted graffiti on the building.

· Candidate was arrested by federal authorities during the interview when the background check revealed the person had an outstanding warrant.

· Candidate told the interviewer she wasn’t sure if the job offered was worth “starting the car for.”

“It may seem unlikely that candidates would ever answer a cellphone during an interview, or wear shorts, but when we talk to hiring managers, we remarkably hear these stories all of the time,” said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources for CareerBuilder.

Lucky for interviewers, she notes that standing out from the crowd – in a good way – is typically a bigger issue for most job-seekers than avoiding a big mistake…


job interviewBy:  Chad Brooks, BusinessNewsDaily Contributor
http://www.businessnewsdaily.com

·         The candidate put the interviewer on hold during a phone interview. When she came back on the line, she told the interviewer she had a date set up for Friday.

·         The candidate wore a Boy Scout uniform and never told interviewers why.

·         The candidate talked about promptness as one of her strengths after showing up 10 minutes late.

·         On the way to the interview, the candidate passed, cut off and flipped his middle finger at a driver who happened to be the interviewer.

·         The candidate took off his shoes during the interview.

·         The candidate asked for a sip of the interviewer’s coffee.

·          When a candidate interviewing for a security position wasn’t hired on the spot, he painted graffiti on the building.

·         Candidate was arrested by federal authorities during the interview when the background check revealed the person had an outstanding warrant.

·         Candidate told the interviewer she wasn’t sure if the job offered was worth “starting the car for.”

“It may seem unlikely that candidates would ever answer a cellphone during an interview, or wear shorts, but when we talk to hiring managers, we remarkably hear these stories all of the time,” said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources for CareerBuilder.

Lucky for interviewers, she notes that standing out from the crowd – in a good way – is typically a bigger issue for most job-seekers than avoiding a big mistake… Leer más “10 Crazy Job Interview Mistakes People Actually Made”