The art of connection, contribution, & change

Presenting naked is about expressing a naturalness in delivery that brings more of your own unique personality to your presentations in a way that amplifies your message. There are many components to an effective, naked presentation, but one simple way to think about it is in terms of what I call The Three Cs : Connection, Contribution, and Change.


http://www.presentationzen.com/presentationzen/2010/11/the-art-of-connection-contribution-change.html

Blackboard Presenting naked is about expressing a naturalness in delivery that brings more of your own unique personality to your presentations in a way that amplifies your message. There are many components to an effective, naked presentation, but one simple way to think about it is in terms of what I call The Three Cs : Connection, Contribution, and Change.

Connection.009-001 • Connection. To make an impact and to make a difference, we have to make a solid connection with others in the room. Where there is no connection, there can be no contribution. If we can make a solid and lasting connection with others, then we create the space for our contribution to be heard and take root. Connection amplifies the experience for both the audience and the speaker. Instead of 1+1=2 with a one-way didactic approach, it’s now 1+1=137 (or a million, etc.).

 

Contribution.002-001 • Contribution. Some people think that a presentation or an invitation to speak is a burden, or at best and obligation that can’t be avoided. This is the wrong attitude. Instead, think of presentation as a welcomed opportunity to make a difference. Every presentation or speech is a chance to make a contribution. We all live for the opportunity to contribute, it’s what makes us human. A contribution is never about us—it’s always about them. We show respect for them by being well prepared. We show we care by sharing a bit of ourselves and a small part of our own humanity. Do not allow yourself to get bogged down in a haze of self-doubt and worry about whether or not you are good enough. To win or to lose is not the point. Boston Philharmonic Orchestra conductor and presenter extraordinaire Benjamin Zander says something similar while encouraging one of his talented students: “We are about contribution. That’s what our job is. It’s not about impressing people. It’s not about getting the next job. It’s about contributing something.” We can apply this spirit to the art of presentation as well.

Connection_slides.005-001 • Change. Through contribution we make a difference—we make a difference because we change things. Sometimes the change is big, and sometimes the change is virtually imperceptible, but it’s real. As a result of our contribution the audience may have gained new knowledge or a skill, or a fresh perspective—or they were inspired to learn more. Because of our talk, presentation, or lesson, there was a change. This positive change resulted from an honest, transparent contribution in the moment. These tiny contributions in the aggregate are what keeps humanity moving forward.

Create art and make change
Connection_slides.004-001 I’ve always said that presentation is more art than science. So what is art? In a recent interview with David Siteman Garland, Seth Godin said this about art in the context of work. “Art,” says Seth Godin, “is a generous action—it’s when a human connects to another human and makes a change.” The work that we do could be art, but if we are just following the rules, playing it safe, and sort of working-by-the-numbers (as in paint-by-the-numbers) then the work lacks connection and difference, and therefore lacks art. The best presentations are art in a sense because the best presenters necessarily connect in the spirit of contribution and generosity and help people make a change. The worst presentations or speeches are the usual ones, the ones that are perfunctory, routine, safe, and utterly forgettable. No one ever got fired for doing the expected and the safe, at least they did not in the old world. But it’s a new world now. And the professionals who are remarkable and who want to make a difference — teachers, doctors, engineers, aid workers, and business people of all types — are the ones who create art. Today, more than ever, there are opportunities to speak in front of others to make a connection and contribute to lasting change—that is, to create art.

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5 Tips for Building Confidence

What do you do when you have to step way out of your comfort zone? We all have to do it from time to time whether we’re closing a big sale, interviewing for a new job, giving a speech or going to a networking event.

In challenging situations like these, building self-confidence can make all the difference in the world. Confidence can turn that feeling of dread into a bubbling sense of excitement. It can open new doors, shake up your expectations and help you to grow in ways you never thought possible. So what are the steps for building confidence? [Más…]

1. Fake it till you make it.

When you’re trying something new or difficult, there’s only so much you can know ahead of time. Sometimes you just have to get in there, make a few mistakes and learn something. That’s the only way you can gain real experience.

It definitely helps to let go of your pride. You might look silly and that’s okay. If someone else was in your shoes, they’d be struggling just like you. Don’t judge yourself too harshly.

Remember that most people are not born natural geniuses. There is always a learning curve involved even for highly talented, exceptional people like yourself. Pablo Picasso once said:

“I am always doing that which I cannot do, in order that I may learn how to do it.”

Even he admitted that you have to make it up as you go.

The good news is that confidence has a snowball effect. If you project confidence, people will take you more seriously and you’ll feel even more confident. You may have started out feeling a little bit like an imposter, but you’ll gain a sense of authority and knowledge as you go.
2. Remember — not everyone has to like you.

We’re conditioned to believe that the worst thing we could ever do is piss someone off. Many of us are so afraid of annoying someone or being misunderstood that we’d rather not try at all. We’d rather dig a hole in the backyard and bury all our dreams in it.

But successful entrepreneurs and business people know that not everyone will like them, and that’s okay. When you put yourself out there, you may rub someone the wrong way. They may not have time for you. They may not understand you. They may not like you all that much. That’s just the way it goes.

Don’t let the fear of not being liked stop you from realizing your true potential. How can you develop confidence if you’re constantly worrying about what other people think? Let go of the need to be liked 100 percent of the time. It’s not going to happen. So you might as well be yourself.


Sarah Nagel
http://workawesome.com/communication/building-confidence/

What do you do when you have to step way out of your comfort zone? We all have to do it from time to time whether we’re closing a big sale, interviewing for a new job, giving a speech or going to a networking event.

In challenging situations like these, building self-confidence can make all the difference in the world. Confidence can turn that feeling of dread into a bubbling sense of excitement. It can open new doors, shake up your expectations and help you to grow in ways you never thought possible. So what are the steps for building confidence? Leer más “5 Tips for Building Confidence”