5 extensiones para Google Chrome para interactuar en Pinterest

Pin Search: al instalar esta extensión se integrará una nueva opción en las imágenes que se han compartido en Pinterest. Verás un botón que dice Search, que con solo dar enter nos redirigirá a Google Imágenes, donde tendremos toda la información recogida en la web sobre esa imágen. No tendremos que realizar ninguna acción más, ya que directamente veremos la búsqueda de la imagen realizada, con los resultados visibles.

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Por  | http://wwwhatsnew.com/ -.-

Si has dado un vistazo a Pinterest y no puedes despegarte de esta red social, te van a interesar algunas opciones que te presentaremos para que tu interacción sea más interesante y sencilla.

Lamentablemente solo podrás utilizar estas extensiones si Google Chrome es tu navegador, pero si piensas pasar tiempo en Pinterest puede ser de utilidad tenerlas en cuenta, aunque tengas otro navegador como preferencia.

Instant Pinterest: si bien tenemos la posibilidad de utilizar el marcador de Pinterest en nuestronavegador para publicar directamente cualquier imágen, esta extensión es más simple y práctica. Solo tienes que situarte sobre la fotografía y dar clic en el botón derecho del mouse y elegir Instant Pin y automáticamente aparecerá en la misma página la ventana emergente para publiques en Pinterest. (Puedes encontrar una similar en Firefox)

Screen 2 Pin:  es una extensión interesante que nos permite hacer captura de pantalla de cualquiersitio web que estemos navegando, para compartirlo directamente en Pinterest. Con solo escoger el icono nos dirigirá a otra pantalla donde veremos la captura y la ventana de Pinterest para señalar el board donde deseamos guardarlo, el texto que deseamos agregar y directamente con dar enter en Pin It se publicará. Leer más “5 extensiones para Google Chrome para interactuar en Pinterest”

Internet 2010 in numbers

http://royal.pingdom.com/2011/01/12/internet-2010-in-numbers/


Internet 2010 in numbers

What happened with the Internet in 2010?

How many websites were added? How many emails were sent? How many Internet users were there? This post will answer all of those questions and many, many more. If it’s stats you want, you’ve come to the right place.

We used a wide variety of sources from around the Web to put this post together. You can find the full list of source references at the bottom of the post if you’re interested. We here at Pingdom also did some additional calculations to get you even more numbers to chew on.

Prepare for a good kind of information overload. ;) Leer más “Internet 2010 in numbers”

What One Thing About Web Design Would You Change Today?

As Web designers and developers, much of our time is spent carving out little corners for ourselves: setting up stops along the information superhighway, creating hangouts to populate the virtual landscape. We shape areas of the Web as we choose to or as our clients command—like Neo altering the Matrix. Unlike Neo, though, we have rules to follow, standards to meet. Web development and design exist in a framework that dictates what we can and cannot do. With this idea of molding the Matrix in mind, we once again turned to our followers on Twitter.

In a recent poll, we asked: if you could make one thing about Web design different today, what would it be? To avoid repetition, we included a caveat: other than making IE disappear? With that, a wide range of answers flooded in on hash tags.

As always, we appreciate everyone who took the time to respond to the poll. Having a strong connection with our readers is rewarding—that’s one thing about the Web design and development community that we hope never changes. Below is a peek at what Web development and design would be like if our Twitter followers and Facebook fans had their say in shaping the industry.
Better Browsers…


http://www.noupe.com/design/what-one-thing-about-web-design-would-you-change-today.html
(…)

Better Browsers…

Even with the proviso in our question, most responses dealt with browsers—just not Internet Explorer. They also brought up how we build for the Web and how our work is interacted with, but browsers seemed to be the topic of the day. Judging by the amount of noise about it, the most frustrating problem is cross-compatibility between vendors. A number of different makers build browsers, and each browser has a unique way of rendering code; in this environment, designing and developing can be a burdensome task, and our readers would change it if they could.

Browsers in What One Thing About Web Design Would You Change Today?

Below are selected responses from our followers that offer a number of approaches to bettering the browser experience, and most of them deal with rendering code. There was variety in the responses, but making all browsers adhere to one set of enforced standards is an extremely popular solution. Compatibility was the focus.

  • I’d make every browser standards-compliant… and every website look amazing!
  • I would make every browser render the same code the same way.
  • Kill vendor-specific codes. No more of this -webkit crap.
  • Make all browsers be in sync. They are out of sync now. That’s the big difference between being a Web and graphic designer.
  • As many have said, cross-browser standards. So much time is wasted creating cross-browser compatibility. I’d also like to see better methods for separating content and navigation forms.
  • I’d ask all developers and companies to create one standard all-in-one Web browser. Need competition anyway? Here: plug-ins!
  • All browsers should have a unified rendering engine.
  • Standardize form elements across platforms and browsers.
  • Force standards. The W3C should have to “allow” browsers to browse the Web—and if -webkit, -moz or 90% of IE’s browser-specific bullshit were there, they’d block the browser. In a week, we’d have development heaven for all.
  • Make every browser read visual elements mathematically the same way so that developers wouldn’t have to care about cross-browsing.
  • We need a single open-source rendering engine (i.e. WebKit) that every browser could use and contribute to—and then we can scrap all other engines.
  • Fix font rendering. Leer más “What One Thing About Web Design Would You Change Today?”

Internet Explorer 9 Beta: Reviewed and Benchmarked | Nettuts+


Windows Internet Explorer 9 Banner

Summary

It appears Microsoft has clear goals when it comes to IE9. They want to embrace modern standards and contribute to governing bodies like W3C to aid interoperability. IE9 is a massive leap forward from IE8′s attempts at HTML5, CSS3 and SVG. And it also feels like this is the browser they wanted to release with Windows 7. Looking at some of the new interface changes, like Jump Lists, reinforces this.

The benchmarks have shown problems still exist between IE9 and HTML5, but the advancements in hardware acceleration really shine through. Bugs do exist, some websites fail to load and it may take some time to get used to the new layout, but we need to remember this is still in beta stages, so maybe we could forgive it for the odd problem throughout development.

So despite it’s cons, I’m happy testing out my latest web designs in IE9 and I am really excited about the final product.

I hope you have enjoyed this introduction to IE9 Beta and try it out, even if it is only to play PacMan in the IE9 Test Center!

Full test here:
Internet Explorer 9 Beta: Reviewed and Benchmarked | Nettuts+
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Google Chrome Version 6 Arrives on Browser’s Second Birthday

It’s hard to believe that two years have passed since the Chrome browser first hit the web. In that time, Chrome has come to control more than 7.5% of the worldwide browser market, according to Net Marketshare. Sure, Internet Explorer and Firefox hold 60.4% and 22.9% respectively, but if one considers that after 10 years, Opera holds less than 2.4%, then it’s fairly impressive.

Now, on its second birthday, Google (Google) has released a stable build of Chrome version 6. Heralding itself as “The Modern Browser,” Chrome (Chrome) 6 does indeed boast a number of improvements, but as with previous updates, the focus remains on speed and simplicity.


Blake Robinson

It’s hard to believe that two years have passed since the Chrome browser first hit the web. In that time, Chrome has come to control more than 7.5% of the worldwide browser market, according to Net Marketshare. Sure, Internet Explorer and Firefox hold 60.4% and 22.9% respectively, but if one considers that after 10 years, Opera holds less than 2.4%, then it’s fairly impressive.

Now, on its second birthday, Google (Google) has released a stable build of Chrome version 6. Heralding itself as “The Modern Browser,” Chrome (Chrome) 6 does indeed boast a number of improvements, but as with previous updates, the focus remains on speed and simplicity. Leer más “Google Chrome Version 6 Arrives on Browser’s Second Birthday”

How to run multiple browsers without installs

If so, you may want to check out a free app from Spoon which allows users to simultaneously run at least four browsers – IE9, FF 4, Chrome 5 and Safari 5 – without the hassle of loading each one.

In addition, the utility can now launch applications from within Chrome and Opera.

How to run multiple=”The Browser Sandbox is a great resource for Web developers and IT managers interested in testing upcoming Web browsers and technologies such as IE 9 and HTML5 without the problems associated with installing a new browser on their desktop,” Spoon CEO Kenji Obata told TG Daily in an e-mailed statement.

“It allows software publishers and enterprises to deliver desktop applications instantly to any user with a Web browser. Spoon apps run in isolated ‘sandboxes,’ enabling multiple applications to run side-by-side without conflicts, dependencies, or modifications to the host PC.”


By Aharon Etengoff

Have you ever wanted to run multiple browsers on your PC

but couldn’t be bothered to install more than one or two?

If so, you may want to check out a free app from Spoon which allows users to simultaneously run at least four browsers – IE9, FF 4, Chrome 5 and Safari 5 – without the hassle of loading each one.

In addition, the utility can now launch applications from within Chrome and Opera.

How to run multiple=“The Browser Sandbox is a great resource for Web developers and IT managers interested in testing upcoming Web browsers and technologies such as IE 9 and HTML5 without the problems associated with installing a new browser on their desktop,” Spoon CEO Kenji Obata told TG Daily in an e-mailed statement.

“It allows software publishers and enterprises to deliver desktop applications instantly to any user with a Web browser. Spoon apps run in isolated ‘sandboxes,’ enabling multiple applications to run side-by-side without conflicts, dependencies, or modifications to the host PC.” Leer más “How to run multiple browsers without installs”

Firefox 4 Beta Adds Multi-touch Support [VIDEOS]

Mozilla has released the newest version of the Firefox 4 Beta, which not only includes hundreds of bug fixes, but also adds long-awaited multi-touch functionality to the browser.

Firefox (Firefox) 4 Beta Version 3 comes with three main updates from its predecessor. First, it addresses several hundred bugs and exploits. Second, it includes a JavaScript update that allows Firefox to execute graphics and animations (heavy in numeric code) with more efficiency. Finally, it allows web authors to monitor and accept touch events (aka, it enables multi-touch functionality).

It’s not as if Firefox 4 magically turns your monitor into a touchscreen, though. This is just the addition of support for multi-touch functionality; it’s up to developers and web companies to implement touch events on their websites. It’s also only available for Windows (Windows) 7 for now; sorry Mac users.


Mozilla has released the newest version of the Firefox 4 Beta, which not only includes hundreds of bug fixes, but also adds long-awaited multi-touch functionality to the browser.

Firefox (Firefox) 4 Beta Version 3 comes with three main updates from its predecessor. First, it addresses several hundred bugs and exploits. Second, it includes a JavaScript update that allows Firefox to execute graphics and animations (heavy in numeric code) with more efficiency. Finally, it allows web authors to monitor and accept touch events (aka, it enables multi-touch functionality).

It’s not as if Firefox 4 magically turns your monitor into a touchscreen, though. This is just the addition of support for multi-touch functionality; it’s up to developers and web companies to implement touch events on their websites. It’s also only available for Windows (Windows) 7 for now; sorry Mac users. Leer más “Firefox 4 Beta Adds Multi-touch Support [VIDEOS]”