Building a Passion Brand: Key Findings and Insights from our 2013 Global Advocacy Study – vía @socialogilvy


“All human actions have one or more of these seven causes: chance, nature, compulsions, habit, reason, passion, desire” – Aristotle

When we think of how people express passion for a brand, do emotions trump reason?

We know brand advocacy is hugely important to making marketing more relevant and effective.  And advocacy via social channels is especially valuable because of its tremendous potential to scale.

But what really drives people to express their passion for a brand through advocacy in social media?   Our newest Social@Ogilvy research – the most comprehensive study of global social advocacy to date – analyzes millions of social brand mentions to help us better understand advocacy for brands online.  The data – which includes about 7 million mentions of 20+ brands and 8 feature films across 4 countries including China, Brazil, UK and US – provide us with insights and clues on how to build brand advocacy.

Here are some key findings:

1) Brands are largely failing at driving advocacy in social media.  Most brands are driving very low social advocacy from their satisfied customers. It’s estimated that less than 5% of satisfied customers advocate publicly for the brand on social channels.  This “social advocacy gap” represents a huge opportunity to improve marketing’s efficiency and effectiveness.

2) Practicality trumps emotion.   Overall, advocates in all four countries were more likely to talk about product features than benefits, cost (or deals/savings), customer service or ads.

3) True passion is rare.  For most brands, the majority of mentions were casual. In the US, only 2 brands had over 50% of mentions falling in the most enthusiastic advocacy category (love, excitement, must-do or buy). And these 2 brands had even more enthusiastic advocacy than blockbuster movies like The Avengers and The Hunger Games.

Based on these findings, we’ve come up with 5 key recommendations for brands interested in tackling the social advocacy gap. Take a look through our study to learn more about how brands can turn advocacy into passion.

A special thanks to Mark Bonchek at Think Orbit, for providing some invaluable suggestions on an earlier draft of our study.

 

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How to create a design style guide – thnxz to @CreativeBloQ


(Abstract… full article +INFO Creative Bloq )

A style guide shouldn’t read like the work of a control freak, but nor should it be vague and ambiguous. Paul Wyatt explains how to strike the right balance.

 

Here are (some of the best) tips for ensuring your style guide does the job right in ensuring others do it right.

It doesn’t have to be perfect

Obviously we’d all love to spend time and energy crafting the perfect design style guide for each project. But in the real world, that’s not always possible. If you’re up against a tight deadline and not able to create a style guide with lots of bells and whistles (and examples), be sure to include the most pertinent and helpful information about the brand or piece of work you’re created in the time you do have.

Full article +INFO 🙂

Essential elements

Start off with:

  • a written overview of the company it’s for
  • a rationale for the work carried out
  • information about logos; font usage; colour palette; tone of voice
  • photographic guides
  • collateral information

 

If you have enough time, it’s worth adding some examples of logo and typographic usage as well as links to master artwork/ brand collateral templates and helpful contacts within your agency or company.

 

 Concentrate on the visible

Look around your workplace and you’ll (hopefully) see colleagues who look presentable and are nicely dressed. Quite possibly a large percentage of these people do not have matching pants and socks or bras and knickers. But who cares? You (hopefully) don’t get to see them. Similarly, in your style guide concentrate on the visible and the relevant. Try not to deep dive into creating colour palettes which then have sub colour palettes and then further sub, sub colour palettes which might never be used or seen.

 

Full article +INFO 🙂

 

 Work with a copywriter

Style guide tips
Big, bold words help energise and communicate brand values in an effective visual way

Work with a copywriter to energise and communicate the brand. This style guide potentially will be used client-side by the in-house creative team or sent out to other agencies to be applied in future work.

For your guide to be applied successfully it’s essential to communicate effectively in written form the brand spirit; the reason behind the work; what the guide is there for; and what the brand goals are that the creative using the guide should be mindful of.

Full article +INFO 🙂

 

Anticipate questions

At the end of the guide include relevant contacts and create a group email address should the reader have any queries about the guide and need to get in touch should there be something the guide does not explain. Although if you’ve included all the relevant details in your guide this should very rarely happen.

Also consider creating an FAQ as part of the guide and think about the top 20 questions a creative might ask about a brand when they first approach it. “I hate your logo. Do I have to use it?” is a question which isn’t allowed.

 

Create art-worked examples

Style guide tips
Art worked header examples from the BBC visual language guide

Art-working up examples of creative templates can be a great way to showcase how the guide can be interpreted. Also consider supplying these files for download with the style guide.

How To Measure Your Loyalty Program’s Incremental ROI – vía @cmo_com


Prior to launching a loyalty program, smart marketers build ROI models…

Vía CMO.com
…that forecast incremental profits based on anticipated lifts across three key customer revenue variables: average order size, yearly purchase frequency, and yearly retention rates. These models make assumptions on funding, breakage, and participation rates to estimate results.

ARTICLE HIGHLIGHTS:

  • How can you tell what loyalty members would have spent if no program existed?
  • New customers are a particularly good segment to break out for high-level comparison.
  • The purest way to measure incremental lift is to randomly assign every existing and new customer to a control group.

    Full article 🙂

For example, “Compare Members versus Nonmembers” section, we performed the following analysis:

• Identified every shopper, loyalty program member and nonmember that made at least one purchase over first three months of loyalty program. For the member group, the purchase had to be made within 24 hours of registering for the loyalty program.

How Brands Brace for #Crisis in the Social Media Age: The Playbook – thnxz @SocialOgilvy @willcaggiano


Written By

The recent hack of @AP and subsequent Wall Street panic slash Dow plunge has once again showed how an alarming event in social media can have a damaging effect.

All sorts of social media crises are on the rise – not just brands seeing their accounts hacked, but errant four-letter words uttered in official tweets, ill-thought hashtags used as “bashtags” by critics, mistreatment of highly vocal highly influential customers and tone-deaf communications during natural tragedies – just to name a few. Sadly, the majority of these sort of #fails could have been prevented with proper preparation on the brands’ part, according to research by the Altimeter Group.

We’ve witnessed first-hand the growing risk brands now face. We’ve seen how social has empowered everyone from the consumer watchdog to the “vocal minority” to the socialized activist group. Try picturing “United Breaks Guitars” or Motrin Moms or “Artic Ready” without social media and you simply can’t conjure the same effect. Social media has transmuted the news cycle – local news swiftly becomes a global story and the iPhone-wielding bystander spawns tomorrow’s front page.

Full article 🙂

So what is a brand to do when faced with a crisis? More importantly, how should a brand prepare for a crisis?

We set out to answer these questions and ended up writing “Our Playbook for Digital Crisis Management 3.0.” Born out of our global experience preparing for and responding to brand and corporate crises, it’s now part of our global training program.

How Much is a Facebook Fan Worth? thnxz to @MarketingPilgrm


If you’re a Facebook brand fan, you’re worth 28% more than you were only three years ago. Doesn’t that make you feel good, to know that your value is rising in the social media world? Right now, you’re averaging about $174 but some brands, like Levis, are ready to hang a much higher price tag around your neck.

Vía http://www.marketingpilgrim.com

Want to know which brands value you more than others? Syncapse has the answer:

SYNCAPSE FACEBOOK VALUE

(The third one down is Monster Energy Drink)

Young, hip brands such as Victoria’s Secret and H&M put the highest value on their Facebook Followers. Old standbys such as CocaCola and Nike, come in under the $100 mark.

Think Insights – thnxz @ThinkwithGoogle


http://google.com/think

KEY STATS

Construyendo branding en social media – gracias a @MkComunidad


Construyendo branding en social media

Diseñar y construir una marca atractiva para la audiencia, es uno de los objetivos que toda estrategia de marketing en social media debería cumplir. Esto sólo se logrará comunicando a los usuarios más allá de los mensajes en sí mismos, es decir, no basta con informar sobre los beneficios y novedades de nuestra marca, o con publicar un post original, debemos saber transmitir la personalidad de nuestra firma en toda acción comunicativa.

Leer el artículo completo…!  🙂

1.Diferenciarse o morir

La diferenciación es tan necesaria en las acciones de branding, como en los demás aspectos de la estrategia empresarial. La personalidad de la marca será la causa, o no, de la fidelidad del cliente. Tu marca ha de ser única, personal e intransferible. El éxito de nuestro branding dependerá de nuestra capacidad para aunar las características y valores que queremos transmitir y las connotaciones distintivas por las que el público nos identifica.

Debemos ser conscientes de quiénes somos, conocer nuestras cualidades y debilidades, es el punto de partida para definir nuestra estrategia de comunicación y marketing en redessociales. El siguiente paso es preguntarnos qué queremos destacar de nuestra personalidad y trabajar en esa línea. Nuestros mensajes deben ser coherentes con la línea comunicativa que hemos predefinido.

Se trata de resaltar nuestro nombre de la manera más honesta y transparente, vinculándolo con una serie de valores que nos acerquen a nuestro público objetivo.

2.Estrategia integrada

Sin importar el número y el tipo de propiedades sociales con las que cuente la marca, todas deberán caminar en una misma línea con la intención de unificar su imagen y hacerla más fácil de identificar (esto no signfica que lo que se publica en una red debe aparecer en todas las demás).  Se trata de reflejar una personalidad única para la marca en todos los mediossociales donde tengamos presencia, adaptándonos a la dinámica propia de cada plataforma.

Nuestra firma deberá trabajar cuidadosamente para mantener en todas sus acciones la misma identidad, algo que pocas empresas llevan a cabo.

3.Gratitud con los  “incondicionales”

Cuando un nombre se encuentra en la construcción de su branding sus consumidores yseguidores “incondicionales serán su arma más fuerte.

Es importante que las firmas tengan a estos incondicionales siempre a su lado, no sólo dando las gracias por sus atenciones, lealtad y compromiso, sino también demostrándoles lo importantes que resultan en la construcción de su marca.

4.Calidad vs Cantidad