Publicidad y Marketing viral: Los secretos del sorprendente efecto mariposa

El efecto mariposa no es sino un ejemplo que se utiliza para ilustrar la teoría del caos. La idea proviene de un antiguo proverbio chino: “El aleteo de una mariposa puede sentirse al otro lado del mundo”. El “efecto dominó”, sin embargo, es algo distinto. Se vale de la imagen de las fichas de dominó colocadas en fila y que caen una tras otra al empujar la primera.


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El efecto mariposa no es sino un ejemplo que se utiliza para ilustrar la teoría del caos. La idea proviene de un antiguo proverbio chino: “El aleteo de una mariposa puede sentirse al otro lado del mundo”. El “efecto dominó”, sin embargo, es algo distinto. Se vale de la imagen de las fichas de dominó colocadas en fila y que caen una tras otra al empujar la primera.

Habitualmente estos términos suelen ser utilizados para referirse a diferentes juegos que colocando sistemáticamente diferentes piezas u objetos formando figuras y mecanismos, genera una reacción en cadena originado tras un pequeño impulso inicial.

Aunque se pueden utilizar todo tipo de objetos para lograr este efecto en cadena, como cajas de cerillas, naipes doblados transversalmente, libros, bloques rectangulares, etc., lo más común y práctico es usar fichas de dominó como su propio efecto nos indica. Sin embargo, en ocasiones y en el caso del efecto mariposa, existen sorprendentes ejemplos donde se ponen en práctica todo tipo de técnicas físicas, mecanismos mecánicos, hidráulicos e incluso eléctricos en la construcción de artificios impactantes, innovadores y atrevidos para dar un giro increíble y genial a la ejecución del juego.

El resultado visual sin duda es sorprendente y en muchas ocasiones impactante. Es por ello que este tipo de juegos han sido utilizados como eje central de muchas acciones de marketing viral y spots publicitarios que han generado una gran expectación e impacto. Como prueba de ello, hemos recogido una selección de videos virales y comerciales donde podremos ver en acción innovadores y creativos ejemplos de este ‘efecto dominó’ o ‘efecto mariposa’… Leer más “Publicidad y Marketing viral: Los secretos del sorprendente efecto mariposa”

The Social Network: The Crisis Of The Male Ego

A girl cut down Mark Zuckerberg’s ego and Facebook was the result. We’re not talking about the real Zuckerberg, but the fictionalized character in David Fincher’s new, masterful little film The Social Network.

In it we meet Zuckerberg (played by Jesse Eisenberg) as he embarks in a verbal tête-à-tête with his current girlfriend Erica Albright (the soon-to-be Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, Rooney Mara). It’s actually more of a one-way conversation with Zuckerberg tearing into Albright with aggressive inquiries and sly insults. He dominates her with a flurry of verbiage, before she reverses the cards and drops the A-bomb on him. He’s an asshole and she wants him to know it, before dumping him for good.

Bruised ego in tact, Zuckerberg takes refuge in his dorm room where he acts out aggressively against the female gender as a whole. He hacks into Harvard, gathers photos of every girl on campus and creates a website where guys can peruse and rank who is the hottest. This is not Facebook but Facemash, a precursor to what Zuckerberg will eventually make billions on.
Voyeurism online

Key to Mark Zuckerberg’s revenge is the whole idea of voyeurism. Facemash was a classic form of male dominance, where men watch unaware women for fetishistic, visual pleasure. It’s the kind of thing that feminist film theorist Laura Mulvey discussed in her article Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema. The male viewer objectifies the female with his gaze and simultaneously declares his own subjectivity.

Facebook, as we know it, enables this sort of voyeurism, this boost to the male ego and it seems perfect that director David Fincher would helm the movie on the subject. The male ego and voyeurism are themes Fincher has explored throughout his films, particularly in Fight Club and his underrated masterpiece Zodiac.
The male ego in Fincher’s films

Both Fight Club and Zodiac feature emasculated men who act out aggressively to assert their male egos.

In the former film, Edward Norton’s character — we’ll call him Jack — is an effeminate male whose dick is trapped in a box by unbridled consumerism. He practically lives in an IKEA catalog with Starbucks in hand. Jack finds masculine release in Tyler Durden, projecting himself onto this ripped, sexy, carnal uber-male embodied by Brad Pitt. This masculine ego, Tyler, asserts itself aggressively through Fight Club, where men beat each other silly and turn into saboteurs.

Zodiac is far subtler in its exploration of the masculine ego. One reason for this is because we know so little about the actual Zodiac killer. But from what we do know, the killer’s bruised ego is evident. The Zodiac’s initial victims were couples, and in each case the male survives because the killer was far more focused on hacking away at the women. That’s male aggression asserting itself by punishing the female sex.

When we learn about the prime suspect, Arthur Leigh Allen (John Carroll Lynch), he comes across as an emasculated man despite his hulking figure. He has an effeminate speech, crosses his legs prettily and we find out that he wasn’t very popular with the ladies.

Like Mark Zuckerberg who acts out on his bruised ego by putting women online, Jack turns to Tyler and Fight Club while Arthur Leigh Allen resorts to putting women in body bags.

More on the crisis of the male ego in David Fincher films after the jump…


Watch and listen to the finest Facebook-inspired pop song in the world. At least she expressed it vocally instead of on her “wall.”

A girl cut down Mark Zuckerberg’s ego and Facebook was the result. We’re not talking about the real Zuckerberg, but the fictionalized character in David Fincher’s new, masterful little film The Social Network.

In it we meet Zuckerberg (played by Jesse Eisenberg) as he embarks in a verbal tête-à-tête with his current girlfriend Erica Albright (the soon-to-be Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, Rooney Mara). It’s actually more of a one-way conversation with Zuckerberg tearing into Albright with aggressive inquiries and sly insults. He dominates her with a flurry of verbiage, before she reverses the cards and drops the A-bomb on him. He’s an asshole and she wants him to know it, before dumping him for good.

Bruised ego in tact, Zuckerberg takes refuge in his dorm room where he acts out aggressively against the female gender as a whole. He hacks into Harvard, gathers photos of every girl on campus and creates a website where guys can peruse and rank who is the hottest. This is not Facebook but Facemash, a precursor to what Zuckerberg will eventually make billions on.

Voyeurism online

Key to Mark Zuckerberg’s revenge is the whole idea of voyeurism. Facemash was a classic form of male dominance, where men watch unaware women for fetishistic, visual pleasure. It’s the kind of thing that feminist film theorist Laura Mulvey discussed in her article Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema. The male viewer objectifies the female with his gaze and simultaneously declares his own subjectivity.

Facebook, as we know it, enables this sort of voyeurism, this boost to the male ego and it seems perfect that director David Fincher would helm the movie on the subject. The male ego and voyeurism are themes Fincher has explored throughout his films, particularly in Fight Club and his underrated masterpiece Zodiac.

The male ego in Fincher’s films

Both Fight Club and Zodiac feature emasculated men who act out aggressively to assert their male egos.

In the former film, Edward Norton’s character — we’ll call him Jack — is an effeminate male whose dick is trapped in a box by unbridled consumerism. He practically lives in an IKEA catalog with Starbucks in hand. Jack finds masculine release in Tyler Durden, projecting himself onto this ripped, sexy, carnal uber-male embodied by Brad Pitt. This masculine ego, Tyler, asserts itself aggressively through Fight Club, where men beat each other silly and turn into saboteurs.

Zodiac is far subtler in its exploration of the masculine ego. One reason for this is because we know so little about the actual Zodiac killer. But from what we do know, the killer’s bruised ego is evident. The Zodiac’s initial victims were couples, and in each case the male survives because the killer was far more focused on hacking away at the women. That’s male aggression asserting itself by punishing the female sex.

When we learn about the prime suspect, Arthur Leigh Allen (John Carroll Lynch), he comes across as an emasculated man despite his hulking figure. He has an effeminate speech, crosses his legs prettily and we find out that he wasn’t very popular with the ladies.

Like Mark Zuckerberg who acts out on his bruised ego by putting women online, Jack turns to Tyler and Fight Club while Arthur Leigh Allen resorts to putting women in body bags.

More on the crisis of the male ego in David Fincher films after the jump…

Leer más “The Social Network: The Crisis Of The Male Ego”

10 Most Dangerous Celebrities…Online

Feeling risky? Go ahead, type Cameron Diaz or Julia Roberts in your Internet search browser, says computer security firm McAfee Inc.

Those two starlets top the company’s annual list of the 10 most dangerous celebrities to search for on the Web.

Diaz and Roberts likely top this year’s because of their recent blockbuster movies, “Knight and Day” for Diaz and “Eat, Pray, Love” for Roberts, and tabloid headline prominence, according to the company.

“Cybercriminals follow the same hot topics as consumers, and create traps based on the latest trends,” said Dave Marcus, security researcher for McAfee Labs, which conducted the study.

This year’s research found that consumers searching for Cameron Diaz pictures or downloads ended up with a 10 percent chance of landing instead on a website with threats like spyware, adware, spam or viruses.

Diaz replaced Jessica Biel, who fell to the third spot, at the top of the list. Supermodel Gisele Bunchden and actor Brad Pitt round out the rest of the top five.


Posted by Katie Kindelan

Feeling risky?  Go ahead, type Cameron Diaz or Julia Roberts in your Internet search browser, says computer security firm McAfee Inc.

Those two starlets top the company’s annual list of the 10 most dangerous celebrities to search for on the Web.

Diaz and Roberts likely top this year’s because of their recent blockbuster movies, “Knight and Day” for Diaz and “Eat, Pray, Love” for Roberts, and tabloid headline prominence, according to the company.

“Cybercriminals follow the same hot topics as consumers, and create traps based on the latest trends,” said Dave Marcus, security researcher for McAfee Labs, which conducted the study.

This year’s research found that consumers searching for Cameron Diaz pictures or downloads ended up with a 10 percent chance of landing instead on a website with threats like spyware, adware, spam or viruses.

Diaz replaced Jessica Biel, who fell to the third spot, at the top of the list.  Supermodel Gisele Bunchden and actor Brad Pitt round out the rest of the top five. Leer más “10 Most Dangerous Celebrities…Online”

8 Reasons Why We are So Obsessed with Celebrity


by jeremywaite

A few years ago, Piers Morgan suggested that celebrity-driven journalism was no longer the way to sell newspapers. Three years ago, a survey found that 60 per cent of adults were bored with celebrity and yet Neilson TV ratings and book sales suggest otherwise.  Why is it that we are so fascinated with celebrities? Leer más “8 Reasons Why We are So Obsessed with Celebrity”