Baxter, el primer robot con sentido común… mejor que muchos humanos!!


http://www.panorama.com.ve
Lo que natura no da…

No es que un robot en una fábrica sea una novedad; hace décadas que la humanidad es testigo de cómo las máquinas van ocupando puestos en varios sectores de la industria en todo el mundo. Pero ahora ya se puede hablar del primer robot humanoide que va a trabajar, codo a codo, con el resto de trabajadores humanos.

Sus fabricantes, Rehink Robotics, aseguran que es una máquina con “sentido común”, que se adapta a su entorno y que trabajadores sin experiencia en robótica pueden entrenarlo, en menos de 30 minutos, para que realice tareas específicas.

Actualmente, los robots tienden a trabajar separados de los seres humanos, a menudo en algo parecido a una jaula.

Pero Rodney Brooks, fundador de Rehink Robotics y exdirector del Laboratorio de Computación, Ciencia e Inteligencia Artificial del Instituto Tecnológico de Massachusetts (MIT, por sus siglas en inglés) espera que Baxter sea un “nuevo concepto en el sector industrial”.

“La robótica ha sido exitosa en el diseño de robots con velocidad y precisión sobrehumana. Lo que ha sido más difícil es inventar robots que puedan actuar como nosotros, en otras palabras, que sean capaces de entender y adaptarse a sus entornos”, explicó.

Según la Federación Internacional de Robótica, actualmente hay 1,1 millones de robots trabajadores en el mundo. En las fábricas de autos, por ejemplo, cerca del 80% de la producción la realizan máquinas.

‘Baxter’ aprende rápido
Pero la diferencia es que Baxter ha sido programado para aplicar su sentido común en el entorno, dicen sus creadores. Está equipado con sensores y otros programas que le permiten “entender”.

Por ejemplo, si se le cae un objeto “sabe” que tiene que conseguir otro antes de tratar de finalizar su tarea. Para entrenar a Baxter, un ser humano debe guiar sus brazos para simular la tarea deseada y apretar un botón para programar el patrón. Si el robot no entiende, responde a la persona con una expresión de confusión. Leer más “Baxter, el primer robot con sentido común… mejor que muchos humanos!!”

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How to Find the Perfect Job Applicant (or Look Like One)

Most readers got our point — and for those who were made extremely uncomfortable, we will provide some thoughts in a minute — but some took us to task for saying that asking someone where they expect to be in five years is a great way to uncover the applicant’s “ambition, personality, values, thinking process, etc. The way people answer this question can tell me a lot about them and whether they are the right person for a particular job/environment.”

Well, we don’t claim to be recruiters. But between the three of us we have hired literally hundreds of people and our experience has been that if you are looking to discover those things, there is a much more direct — and we would argue better — way of finding out. Ask the person what they have been (or are now) utterly committed to in their life: “What really turns you on and attracts you almost in spite of yourself? What are the things that you can’t put out of your mind?”

What our organizations need today — perhaps above all else — is commitment. People who truly want to do a great job. Who are driven to do so. The best way to find out if someone has that kind of desire and commitment is to ask about times they have demonstrated it in the past.

Does it have to be work-related?

It would be nice, but no.


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HBR Blog Network

Leonard A. Schlesinger, Charles F. Kiefer, and Paul B. Brown

LEONARD A. SCHLESINGER, CHARLES F. KIEFER, AND PAUL B. BROWN
Leonard A. Schlesinger is the president of Babson College. Charles F. Kiefer is president of Innovation Associates. Paul B. Brown is a long-time contributor to the New York Times. They are the coauthors of Just Start: Take Action, Embrace Uncertainty, Create the Future(HBR Press 2012). Learn more at juststartthebook.com.

While we are flattered by the response to our previous post,Career Plans Are Dangerous, we weren’t quite anticipating the push back. All we were saying is that if you find yourself in a profession which is evolving rapidly, career planning just doesn’t make a lot of sense. And our advice to employers was equally straightforward: If no one knows what the future in your field is going to be, then asking the standard interview question “where do you see yourself in five years?” is silly. Leer más “How to Find the Perfect Job Applicant (or Look Like One)”

Refining and Maximizing Your Pitching Strategy

Product News Pitching –One attendee brought up a good inquiry – since a popular announcement for clients is new product news, what is the best way to entice the media to cover them? The panelists confirmed something we’ve heard many times: they will rarely cover straight product news. However, there are a few ways to make the information interesting to the media:Tie the news into company strategy. Does the new product reflect a recent shift in what the company is doing as a whole?Explore other angles related to the company. Is there an interesting story about the CEO or a non-profit initiative the company is doing?
Going beyond your client list when pitching trends – When asked what makes a really strong pitch, Katie made a great point that a lot of us lose sight of when writing trend pitches. According to her, using examples in your pitch from companies or brands that aren’t your clients not only shows a reporter that you’ve done your research and know the industry, but establishes your pitch as an actual trend; rather than merely news from your client. As PR professionals, we are constantly getting pressure from clients to get media coverage and it’s easy to put our blinders on and only focus on using their examples. Katie’s advice is a great reminder that looking at the bigger picture and staying on top of industry news pays off and gives you a better shot at your pitch becoming a story.
“On Background” versus “Off the Record” – One question that came up at the event was whether or not to advise clients to say things as “off the record.” As PR practitioner, our general rule of thumb is that nothing is ever off the record; however the panel seemed to be much more laid back about that question (or maybe we just had an especially lovely handful of journalists at this event!). Katie then explained to the audience the difference between “on background” and “off the record.” “On background” means that your client can offer information; however, saying upfront that it’s on background means that the journalist won’t attribute them as the source for the information. Depending on the journalist, they’ll either find a different source for the information or leave it as anonymous. When advising our clients, however, we think we’ll still stick with our “nothing is off the record” mantra and play it safe.


http://451heat.com/
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Image of Panel taken by @BostonKateAs media budgets are tightening and new social media sites are popping up left and right, they are varying the ways we can connect with reporters. We as PR professionals are constantly changing our media relations strategy. Tuesday night, three members of our public relations team here at 451 Marketing, attended a panel hosted by the Pub Club of New England, where several members of the Boston media unraveled a part of that equation and lent some insights from “the other side”, about how we can improve our pitching content and strategy such as how to get that elusive product coverage. On the panel were Jim Finkle (@techwriterjim),technology and cyber security reporter for Reuters; Katie Johnston (@ktkjohnston), business reporter for the Boston Globe; Erin Kutz (@erkutz), associate editor for Xconomy.com; Lisa van der Pool (@lvanderpool), CBS Boston contributor and reporter for the Boston Business Journal and Joe Roche (@BostonNewsGuy), news assignment manager for WCVB-TV.

 

 Below, our team shares a few key takeaways…: Leer más “Refining and Maximizing Your Pitching Strategy”

Comcast Cares, una historia de twitter como plataforma de relación con clientes

A principios de 2008, una “telco” americana llamada Comcast sufrió un tremendo castigo al verse en la parte más baja del Índice de Satisfacción de Clientes de EEUU, un estudio que monitoriza las opiniones de más de 200 empresas americanas.

Comcast comenzó a conocerse por sus malas prácticas de negocio y su deficiente servicio al cliente. Tanto fue así, que fue colgada en la red una página llamada ComcastMustDie.com (Comcastdebemorir) en la que cientos de clientes comenzaron a publicar sus quejas.

Estaba claro que Comcast tenía que reaccionar. Fue cuando Frank Eliasson, por aquel entonces director de servicio online de la Compañía, comenzó a monitorizar las quejas de los clientes a través de Twitter.

Para sorpresa de muchos de estos clientes, Frank Eliasson abrió la cuenta @ComcastCares en Twitter y comenzó a contactar con ellos estableciendo un diálogo con el objetivo de calmar los ánimos y encontrar soluciones a los problemas que habían manifestado.


por Francisco Javier Sánchez
http://www.marketingcomunidad.com/comcast-cares-una-historia-de-twitter-como-plataforma-de-relacion-con-clientes.html

A principios de 2008, una “telco” americana llamada Comcast sufrió un tremendo castigo al verse en la parte más baja del Índice de Satisfacción de Clientes de EEUU, un estudio que monitoriza las opiniones de más de 200 empresas americanas.

Comcast comenzó a conocerse por sus malas prácticas de negocio y su deficiente servicio al cliente. Tanto fue así, que fue colgada en la red una página llamada ComcastMustDie.com (Comcastdebemorir) en la que cientos de clientes comenzaron a publicar sus quejas.

Estaba claro que Comcast tenía que reaccionar. Fue cuando Frank Eliasson, por aquel entonces director de servicio online de la Compañía, comenzó a monitorizar las quejas de los clientes a través de Twitter.

Para sorpresa de muchos de estos clientes, Frank Eliasson abrió la cuenta @ComcastCares en Twitter y comenzó a contactar con ellos estableciendo un diálogo con el objetivo de calmar los ánimos y encontrar soluciones a los problemas que habían manifestado. Leer más “Comcast Cares, una historia de twitter como plataforma de relación con clientes”

Jim Spencer’s Take On Shopper Social Media Marketing

I recently published the infographic illustrating the number of soical media followers for U.S. supermarkets and I’ve been following up with colleagues in social media land to ask their opinion on what they believe the numbers mean for the grocery industry.

Jim Spencer from JBS Partners, is a colleague from Boston who was kind enough to answer a few questions, here’s the result:

John: What does this chart say about the state of social media adoption among large grocery chains?

Jim: The chart indicates that there is growing adoption that is very inconsistently applied across a range of mediums. Assuming that the content is worthwhile my hat is off to the four companies that are in the lead on YouTube. This is a much harder form of content to generate and video is where everyone will soon be following.

It looks like there are both corporate adoption and individual store adoption numbers recorded here, but I don’t know if this represents aggregated counts or just the mother-ship.


Jim Spencer on supermarket social media marketing I recently published the infographic illustrating the number of soical media followers for U.S. supermarkets and I’ve been following up with colleagues in social media land to ask their opinion on what they believe the numbers mean for the grocery industry.

Jim Spencer from JBS Partners, is a colleague from Boston who was kind enough to answer a few questions, here’s the result:

John: What does this chart say about the state of social media adoption among large grocery chains?

Jim: The chart indicates that there is growing adoption that is very inconsistently applied across a range of mediums.   Assuming that the content is worthwhile my hat is off to the four companies that are in the lead on YouTube. This is a much harder form of content to generate and video is where everyone will soon be following.

It looks like there are both corporate adoption and individual store adoption numbers recorded here, but I don’t know if this represents aggregated counts or just the mother-ship.
Leer más “Jim Spencer’s Take On Shopper Social Media Marketing”

Run A Marathon… In Your Web Browser… No Moving Required

Running a marathon is hard. I should know, I’ve never even considered running one. But a lot of people do. And a lot of people like the idea of going to watch others run marathons. I have no idea why, but they do — I’ve seen it on TV. Anyway, if you have any interest in tracking a marathon, Skyhook Wireless has a pretty cool way of doing it.

The San Francisco Marathon is this coming Sunday. To coincide with it, Skyhook Wireless has set up a new “Skyhook Experience” to track the event. On their page, you’ll be able to see geotagged tweets, Flickr photos, and Foursquare check-ins all around the event in realtime. You’ll also be able to go back in time (with a slider) to watch all of the aforementioned data evolve.

The idea is similar to the Vicarious.ly site SimpleGeo set up for SXSW. Like SimpleGeo, Skyhook is doing this to showcase their data. On the map you can not only see (and click on) individual data points, but you can see heat maps of particularly hot areas of geo data.


Running a marathon is hard. I should know, I’ve never even considered running one. But a lot of people do. And a lot of people like the idea of going to watch others run marathons. I have no idea why, but they do — I’ve seen it on TV. Anyway, if you have any interest in tracking a marathon, Skyhook Wireless has a pretty cool way of doing it.

The San Francisco Marathon is this coming Sunday. To coincide with it, Skyhook Wireless has set up a new “Skyhook Experience” to track the event. On their page, you’ll be able to see geotagged tweets, Flickr photos, and Foursquare check-ins all around the event in realtime. You’ll also be able to go back in time (with a slider) to watch all of the aforementioned data evolve.

The idea is similar to the Vicarious.ly site SimpleGeo set up for SXSW. Like SimpleGeo, Skyhook is doing this to showcase their data. On the map you can not only see (and click on) individual data points, but you can see heat maps of particularly hot areas of geo data. Leer más “Run A Marathon… In Your Web Browser… No Moving Required”