Why Content is the Foundation of your Social Media Marketing

I was only nine but I had just discovered the attraction and magic of books.
After learning to read I started to find the allure of the printed page compelling and contagious. I started borrowing books from the school library about pirates and tropical adventures and other stories that took me to far away places as my imagination took flight.
The book bug had bitten me so hard that reading two to three books a week wasn’t unusual and the school librarian must have thought that I was stalking her. This healthy obsession with stories and books had me reading under the bed covers at night with my bed site lamp hidden under the blankets after the obligatory nights out curfew so that my parents thought I was still asleep!
The power of stories and their power to engage my imagination had me enthralled.
Story Two: News and the Man on the Moon
It was such a big news event that school finished early and we were able to go home and watch the man land on the moon.
Television was still black and white and I remember watching the shaky images from the moon arriving on the TV screen as Neil Armstrong announced “One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind”
Watching man step onto the moon is a memory I will never forget.
The power of media to distribute powerful newsstories was evident on that day July 20, 1969 .
Story Three: Discovering Information on the World Wide Web
It was in 1995 and I remember connecting up the modem and logging onto the internet for the first time. Alta vista was a crude but still useful search engine that allowed you to find information from the web that has since seen the death of printed encyclopedias and the rise of wikipedia.
I remember thinking that my visits to the library would not be so frequent anymore and hunting for information would be quicker and much more convenient.
Information, data and content could now be found and consumed from the other side of the world via the internet and personal computer.
Stories, news and information are eagerly sought by everyone and these can all be published online. This is content, any media that can be published on the web.
Social media marketing requires content that is compelling and contagious. It requires content that begs to be shared. It requires content that is so liquid that people want to share it online and offline.
Social media marketing without these types of content is like man without a soul or a king without clothes.
Content is the Hub and Heart of Social Media.

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Coca Cola, which is one of the worlds most recognized brands has recently announced that its marketing strategy is moving from “creative excellence” to “content excellence“.Why Content is the Foundation of your Social Media Marketing

This is due to the the realization that on a social web people can create more dynamic stories about a business and brand than they can ever hope to achieve on their own.

Coca Cola is making sure that it is embracing this changing paradigm in marketing and creating content that is  liquid and contagious and let the global crowd create the dynamic stories about a brand.

This is the crowd sourcing of marketing.

This is what makes social media marketing so effective, it taps into the leverage of the conversations of billions of people that communicate and share daily on the global web.

This reminds me of three stories.

Story One: Books and the Power of Imagination Leer más “Why Content is the Foundation of your Social Media Marketing”

Three Keys to (Much) Better Decisions

The simple act of making decisions, says the researcher Roy Baumeister, progressively depletes our ability to make them well. We begin to experience something called “decision fatigue.” Worse yet, we’re often not even consciously aware of feeling tired and impaired.

Here’s how the brain compensates: As much as 95 percent of the time, it makes decisions automatically, by habit, or in reaction to an external demand. So what would it take to intentionally make better decisions in a world of infinite choices?

The answer begins with self-awareness. Our first challenge is resist being reactive. Many of our worst decisions occur after we’ve been triggered — meaning that something or someone pushes us into negative emotion and we react instinctively, fueled by our stress hormones, in a state of fight or flight.

That’s all well and good if there’s a lion charging at you. It’s not very useful in everyday life. Most of the time, it makes more sense to live by the Golden Rule of Triggers: Whatever you feel compelled to do, don’t.

If you respond out of a compulsion, you haven’t made an intentional choice. It may feel right — even righteous — in the moment, but it’s more likely to exacerbate the problem than solve it.

Here are three keys to making really good decisions:

1. The first key is not to make bad ones. That begins with self- awareness — becoming more attentive to the physical signs that you’re feeling a sense of threat. The most common ones are tightness in any part of your body, more rapid breathing, and the experience of anger or fear. The intensity of an emotion is not a reason to act on it.

Instead, when you recognize what’s happening in your body, take a couple of deep breaths — breathe in to a count of three, out to a count of six. Then feel your feet, which will ground you back in reality.

All you’re trying to do here is buy time. It’s only when you quiet your physiology that you can think clearly and reflectively about how best to respond.


Tony Schwartz

TONY SCHWARTZ
http://blogs.hbr.org

Tony Schwartz is the president and CEO of The Energy Project and the author of Be Excellent at Anything. Become a fan of The Energy Project on Facebook and connect with Tony at Twitter.com/TonySchwartz and Twitter.com/Energy_Project.

Recently, I came across this startling statistic. Each day, we make an average of 217 food-related decisions. Is it any surprise we so often make poor choices about what we eat?

The simple act of making decisions, says the researcher Roy Baumeister, progressively depletes our ability to make them well. We begin to experience something called “decision fatigue.” Worse yet, we’re often not even consciously aware of feeling tired and impaired.

Here’s how the brain compensates: As much as 95 percent of the time, it makes decisions automatically, by habit, or in reaction to an external demand. So what would it take to intentionally make better decisions in a world of infinite choices? Leer más “Three Keys to (Much) Better Decisions”

Why You Need to Make Your Life More Automatic

How different would your life be, after all, if you could get yourself to sleep 8 hours at night, exercise every day, eat healthy foods in the right portions, take time for reflection and renewal, remain calm and positive under stress, focus without interruption for sustained periods of time, and prioritize the work that matters most?

Right now, the vast majority of what we do each day occurs automatically. We’re often triggered, as these authors make vividly clear, by subtle cues we’re not even aware of — a smell, a visual image, a familiar sight. These cues prompt us to move away from any potential pain and discomfort, no matter how minimal, and toward immediate reward and gratification, no matter how fleeting.

The primary role of our prefrontal cortex is to bias the brain towards doing the “harder” thing. Unfortunately, our rational capacity is often overwhelmed by the power of our own most visceral and primitive desires.

We’re often captive to our biochemistry. When the neurotransmitter dopamine is triggered, for example, what we feel is craving, not pleasure. This explains not just why we fall into a range of self-destructive addictions, but also why we don’t take better care of ourselves and make wiser choices day in and day out.

The solution is to learn how to co-opt the more primitive habit-forming regions of our brains, so that rather than reinforcing our negative impulses, they become the soil in which we build positive rituals that serve our long term interests.


Tony Schwartz

TONY SCHWARTZ
http://blogs.hbr.org/

Tony Schwartz is the president and CEO of The Energy Project and the author of Be Excellent at Anything. Become a fan of The Energy Project on Facebook and connect with Tony at Twitter.com/TonySchwartz and Twitter.com/Energy_Project.

Why is it that three prominent books published just during the past several months focused on the subject of willpower?

The first answer is that neuroscience has finally begun to open a window into the complex way our brains respond to temptation and what it takes to successfully exercise choice.

Second, a raft of recent studies have shown that the capacity for self-control — even more than genetic endowment or material advantage — fuels a range of positive outcomes in life, including more stable relationships, higher paying and more satisfying work, more resilience in the face of setbacks, better health, and greater happiness.

Finally, these books — WillpowerThe Willpower Instinct, andThe Power of Habit — are a response to an increasingly evident need. Demand in our lives is truly outpacing our capacity.

The sheer number of choices we must make each day — what foods to eat, what products to buy, what information merits our attention, what tasks to prioritize — can be overwhelming. As Roy Baumeister puts it in Willpower, “Self-regulation failure is the major social pathology of our time.” Leer más “Why You Need to Make Your Life More Automatic”

How to pitch your idea so that you get fundin

I do help some and I wish I could do more but the schedule just doesn’t permit it. Instead, let me recommend a resource.

ideaselling is a book that gives you the tools and techniques to help you sell your ideas to those who hold the budgets. The books contains numerous tips from a wide range of people working in the creative economy such designers, writers, marketers and other creative professionals. Their success depends on the ability to sell their ideas to their bosses and clients. If you have the killer idea, this book will enable you to convince


PHILMCKINNEY | http://philmckinney.com

how to pitch your killer idea so that you get fundingGiven that I spend most of my day being pitched ideas, I’m frustrated by how many people struggle with how to pitch their ideas so that others will join the cause.  Let’s not fool ourselves, selling an idea is all about selling the cause.  The ability to convince others that they should stop (or pause) what they are working on and join you is a skill all creatives need. The key is not to focus on the technology or the cool widget but to tell a story that the person can put themselves into.  You want them to see themselves not just using but desiring the idea you are pitching.

Over the years, I’ve learned by trial and error (more errors than I would care to admit) the do’s and don’ts and I shared some of them in a past podcast (Podcast: Making The Innovation Pitch).  One request I get is to help people with crafting their pitchs. Leer más “How to pitch your idea so that you get fundin”

8 Books to Sharpen Your Ninja Marketing Skills

You may not be a marketing consultant by trade. But each of us, once hired to handle work for our client, becomes part of the giant grinding wheel of marketing; and even a cursory knowledge of the marketing basics, along with some hot tips from the minds and sciences on the bleeding edge, will give you the sharper dueling blade you need to pull ahead of your competition (but no beheading please).

To get the most out of this list, here are a few tips:

* I recommend getting a digital book reader or even just downloading Amazon’s free Kindle App for your PC or Mac. Why? Because I’ve noticed my ability to read and digest massive amounts of information increased dramatically when I started buying and reading my books digitally.

I believe this is a) because I spend so much frickin’ time online that my brain is trained to move through information much faster in this context and b) because if you’re anything like me you get stir crazy at home and it’s nice to get away to a cafe or a new locale and that’s hard to do when you’re hoisting around fifty books. And yes, I reference my hundreds of books regularly.
* These books are not your typical Marketing 101 books. These are deep immersions into neuroscience-based branding, neuro-linguistic programming, culture codes, what motivates us, and so much more. Savvy entrepreneur clients and business leaders are aware of these books and will be impressed that you are too. Smaller businesses and professionals who are not aware of these books will benefit so drastically from your garnered knowledge here that packing this extra value into your current skill and knowledge sets will do wonders for your freelancing career.
* Some people revere books the way they revere the Mona Lisa. Keep ‘em crisp, keep ‘em clean, if it looks used, it’s been abused!! Well I’m of the opinion that a book well used is a book well loved. My physical and digital books are swimming with notes carved into their margins, highlights and scribbles dashing through the text, and errant notes like mohawks jut out of the pages where I’ve run out of room and added a torn sheet from my notepad.

Because these are the kinds of books you’ll reference often, I recommend loving your books thoroughly and not being afraid to show it. : Use a highlighter or the “Notes and Marks” tool on your e-reader to mark key passages and as they ignite ideas, be sure to jot them down in the book or a notebook/document you keep handy that houses all your brainstorms.
* Don’t believe in the power of a single book? I recently had a potential launch client with a massive brand tell me that my prior work lacked the quality and verve they were looking for (they wanted heart instead of hype and as we copywriters must give clients what they want, most of my past client clips demonstrated elegant hype).


You may not be a marketing consultant by trade. But each of us, once hired to handle work for our client, becomes part of the giant grinding wheel of marketing; and even a cursory knowledge of the marketing basics, along with some hot tips from the minds and sciences on the bleeding edge, will give you the sharper dueling blade you need to pull ahead of your competition (but no beheading please).

To get the most out of this list, here are a few tips:

  • I recommend getting a digital book reader or even just downloading Amazon’s free Kindle App for your PC or Mac. Why? Because I’ve noticed my ability to read and digest massive amounts of information increased dramatically when I started buying and reading my books digitally.

    I believe this is a) because I spend so much frickin’ time online that my brain is trained to move through information much faster in this context and b) because if you’re anything like me you get stir crazy at home and it’s nice to get away to a cafe or a new locale and that’s hard to do when you’re hoisting around fifty books. And yes, I reference my hundreds of books regularly.
  • These books are not your typical Marketing 101 books. These are deep immersions into neuroscience-based branding, neuro-linguistic programming, culture codes, what motivates us, and so much more. Savvy entrepreneur clients and business leaders are aware of these books and will be impressed that you are too. Smaller businesses and professionals who are not aware of these books will benefit so drastically from your garnered knowledge here that packing this extra value into your current skill and knowledge sets will do wonders for your freelancing career.
  • Some people revere books the way they revere the Mona Lisa. Keep ‘em crisp, keep ‘em clean, if it looks used, it’s been abused!! Well I’m of the opinion that a book well used is a book well loved. My physical and digital books are swimming with notes carved into their margins, highlights and scribbles dashing through the text, and errant notes like mohawks jut out of the pages where I’ve run out of room and added a torn sheet from my notepad.

    Because these are the kinds of books you’ll reference often
    , I recommend loving your books thoroughly and not being afraid to show it. : Use a highlighter or the “Notes and Marks” tool on your e-reader to mark key passages and as they ignite ideas, be sure to jot them down in the book or a notebook/document you keep handy that houses all your brainstorms.
  • Don’t believe in the power of a single book? I recently had a potential launch client with a massive brand tell me that my prior work lacked the quality and verve they were looking for (they wanted heart instead of hype and as we copywriters must give clients what they want, most of my past client clips demonstrated elegant hype).

    Leer más “8 Books to Sharpen Your Ninja Marketing Skills”

Oxford English Dictionary May Never Be Published Again

The definitive dictionary of the English language, the Oxford English Dictionary, may well never see the light of day again, only the light of a monitor. Nigel Portwood, chief executive of Oxford University Press, which publishes the OED, told the London Sunday Times that dictionaries sales have been falling off at a rate greater than 10% a year for the last few years. So the next edition may be online only.

Such a move might be financially reasonable. After all, the current online edition gets two million hits monthly at $400 per user, and more people are favoring compact, universally-retrievable sources of information. But is finance all we should consider?

Over at GigaOm, Matthew Ingram asks if we should care. His response, if I’m reading him right, is yes. I yearned for an opportunity to disagree, dramatically, just pro forma. But I can’t. I’ll go into a bit more detail on why a “hardcopy” of the dictionary (I favor the neo-logism, “book”) is still desirable.

oed2.jpgThe idea of small, lightweight, online, retrievable sources of reference materials is fantastic. I use Dictionary.com more than I use my Websters. (Though Websters gets money either way.) So why not the OED? After all, the twenty-volume mega-book is, at almost $1,600 hellishly expensive and, if you’re sub-Ferrigno, immovable.

Because while some books are repositories of information, others are experiences. Although the OED is not a narrative, not scripture, not poetry, it is, nonetheless, transportive. The idea of flipping from one entry to another, following a line of inquiry (especially etymological inquiry) from one page to another, even one volume to another, is a sensual experience. I don’t mean it’s sexy (it is), but rather that it’s an experience that encompasses sight, sound and touch and even hearing (the rustle of pages, the thump of the volume hitting the desk) to create the context for comprehension.


oed.gifThe definitive dictionary of the English language, the Oxford English Dictionary, may well never see the light of day again, only the light of a monitor. Nigel Portwood, chief executive of Oxford University Press, which publishes the OED, told the London Sunday Times that dictionaries sales have been falling off at a rate greater than 10% a year for the last few years. So the next edition may be online only.

Such a move might be financially reasonable. After all, the current online edition gets two million hits monthly at $400 per user, and more people are favoring compact, universally-retrievable sources of information. But is finance all we should consider?

Over at GigaOm, Matthew Ingram asks if we should care. His response, if I’m reading him right, is yes. I yearned for an opportunity to disagree, dramatically, just pro forma. But I can’t. I’ll go into a bit more detail on why a “hardcopy” of the dictionary (I favor the neo-logism, “book”) is still desirable.

oed2.jpgThe idea of small, lightweight, online, retrievable sources of reference materials is fantastic. I use Dictionary.com more than I use my Websters. (Though Websters gets money either way.) So why not the OED? After all, the twenty-volume mega-book is, at almost $1,600 hellishly expensive and, if you’re sub-Ferrigno, immovable.

Because while some books are repositories of information, others are experiences. Although the OED is not a narrative, not scripture, not poetry, it is, nonetheless, transportive. The idea of flipping from one entry to another, following a line of inquiry (especially etymological inquiry) from one page to another, even one volume to another, is a sensual experience. I don’t mean it’s sexy (it is), but rather that it’s an experience that encompasses sight, sound and touch and even hearing (the rustle of pages, the thump of the volume hitting the desk) to create the context for comprehension. Leer más “Oxford English Dictionary May Never Be Published Again”

Why I Love 37signals

I don’t own any of 37signal‘s products. As a matter of fact, using Basecamp annoys the heck out of me. But I love 37signals and everything they do and stand for.

Why? They’re not afraid to say what they think, no matter who might get offended. A week ago, I posted an article called Teaching Graphic Designers About The Web. Personally I thought it was a great article and it seem to do well traffic-wise.

However a small demographic of my readers decided to completely ignore the 700+ word article and instead focus on one word – gay. Yes, I called the Droid gay. And no, I don’t regret it.


Image representing 37signals as depicted in Cr...
Image via CrunchBase
I don’t own any of 37signal‘s products. As a matter of fact, using Basecamp annoys the heck out of me. But I love 37signals and everything they do and stand for.Why? They’re not afraid to say what they think, no matter who might get offended. A week ago, I posted an article called Teaching Graphic Designers About  The Web. Personally I thought it was a great article and it seem to do well traffic-wise.

However a small demographic of my readers decided to completely ignore the 700+ word article and instead focus on one word – gay. Yes, I called the Droid gay. And no, I don’t regret it.

Why People Hate 37signals

I’ve never heard anyone say that they hated 37signals because their products stunk. Or their customer services. Or even their prices. Instead, people choose to hate 37signals because they think their “pompous” and “arrogant”. Apparently being truthful, speaking your mind and injecting humor into your writings now classifies as “arrogant” in the world today. Pity.

I’ve listened to every one of their podcasts and read all of their books. I have never seen one thing that was arrogant or pompous. I think their writing is hilarious and I actually enjoy reading their business books instead of falling asleep like I have with so many other’s books.

Why is it that in this day and age, we have to be so stuck up as to “punish” those that think outside of the box? You don’t want a full-time job? The government punishes you by making you pay double taxes. You want to be an artist? You get laughed at, the crappy building in college or told to get a real job. This world is seems to be built like a factory where from kindergarten you’re told to sit down, shut up and do the same thing as everyone else.

Another reason people hate 37signals is because 37signals writes about how they’ve been successful in business and people claim it can’t “always” be done like that. Well of course, it doesn’t work for everyone, otherwise we’d all be rich, right? Do you really want another general advise business book or a company writing about practices they don’t actually do; or do you want to hear about what a company actually did to be successful? Leer más “Why I Love 37signals”