How To Start Developing Your Own Apps


See on Scoop.itGabriel Catalano the name of the game

Software development is going mobile, bringing applications to phones, laptops and tablets everywhere, including the classroom. Leer más “How To Start Developing Your Own Apps”

Día de la Industria / gentileza Canal Encuentro


Finally, an Espresso Machine for the Car

The invention frees caffeine lovers from the tyranny of the clunky, immobile espresso machine. The company draws its unofficial motto, “Liberté, qualité, mobilité” from the French Revolution slogan, “Liberté, égalité, fraternité.”

Some might consider front-seat brewing an accident waiting to happen. No laws prohibit this kind of drinking and driving, but the company encourages users to stop their cars to savor the espresso, says spokeswoman Catherine Nielsen, also the wife of Handpresso inventor Henrik Nielsen, who passed away three months ago, before this product hit the market.

Handpresso Auto started selling in France last month for €149—the first shipments go out in April—and the company will make a big push at the Paris Motor Show in September. As part of a viral marketing strategy, samples have also been distributed to cab drivers, who have received positive feedback from passengers so far.


By  and 
http://www.businessweek.com

0326_handpresso_630x420It’s 8:45 a.m. and you’re just getting into your car to leave for work. There’s no time for coffee—but you’ve never needed it more. A new espresso machine that plugs into a car’s cigarette lighter socket aims to give French drivers a cup of espresso wherever they are.

The Handpresso Auto is the newest addition to Fontainebleau-based Handpresso’s line of portable, hand-held espresso makers. Users plug the machine, about the size of a flashlight, into a cigarette lighter, add water, pop in a pod of espresso grounds (any brand is fine), and press a button. Water is pumped through the grounds at 16 bars of pressure—nine bars is typically considered the minimum—and the drink is ready in two minutes (click to see a video). Leer más “Finally, an Espresso Machine for the Car”

Do We Need a Copyright Symbol for Sharing?

Found a funny cat photo online? You can post it on Pinterest, tweet it, Tumblr it, or Facebook it—but Maria Popova, the blogger behind the popular Brainpickingswebsite, says you’d better be sure to cite where you found it.
Popova spends hours each day finding links to share with her audience, and argues that curating others’ work makes her just as much a creator as the people she blogs about. And just as deserving of credit.

“Discovery of information is a form of intellectual labor,” she said to theNew York Times.
“When we don’t honor discovery, we are robbing somebody’s time and labor.” She’s proposed the

“Curator’s Code” to standardize attribution on the Web, with two new characters that would work much like the © symbol used to indicate copyright >>>>


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Found a funny cat photo online? You can post it on Pinterest, tweet it, Tumblr it, or Facebook it—but Maria Popova, the blogger behind the popular Brainpickingswebsite, says you’d better be sure to cite where you found it.
0313_tech_copyright630x420Popova spends hours each day finding links to share with her audience, and argues that curating others’ work makes her just as much a creator as the people she blogs about. And just as deserving of credit.

“Discovery of information is a form of intellectual labor,” she said to theNew York Times.
“When we don’t honor discovery, we are robbing somebody’s time and labor.” She’s proposed the

Curator’s Code” to standardize attribution on the Web, with two new characters that would work much like the © symbol used to indicate copyright  >>>> Leer más “Do We Need a Copyright Symbol for Sharing?”

The CEO’s Innovation Nightmare – BusinessWeek


yellow

What is to be done?

Some Helpful Tips

We know this column could come across as a bit cynical. But we are truly hopeless optimists, so let’s get to some solutions. If you are a bullish CEO or a bullish innovator within the ranks, here are few tips that will absolutely make your corporate life better—and more fulfilling.

Let’s start with counsel for the CEOs:

Recruit believers. Henry Ford said, “If you believe you can or believe you can’t, you’re right.” If you have people on your staff who don’t really believe change is possible or that the old way is good enough, for God‘s sake, release them to find a more fulfilling destiny. If you don’t have the guts to do it, then please stop saying you are going to change the world. Because your people simply won’t let it happen, and you are going to look like a fool.

Hire objective senior managers. This is a nice way of saying you should bring in leaders from outside your industry.

Full article:
The CEO’s Innovation Nightmare – BusinessWeek
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How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love My Job – And Leave It

I’ve noticed a rash of design professionals leaving their jobs lately to pursue creative freedom. Designer Frank Chimero, Helen Walters of BusinessWeek, Andrio Abero of Wieden+Kenndey, and Alex Bogusky of MDC Partners have all written high-profile accounts or made announcements about going on hiatus or quitting. There are countless others leaving both high-ranking positions as well as quieter corners. Is this an industry that is constantly in flux, or is there something to be said about all the ship-jumping? While each “adventurer” (a less patronizing title than “dreamer”) will have their own personal reasons, I can offer some insight into my own recent experience of striking out on my own.
How it started: The two year itch

Over the past year or two I’ve been busy. I’ve been reading up on creativity, motivation, process, design and art, and I’ve been weighing the lofty ideas of commercialism and environmentalism against each other. I’ve been trying to perfect my strategic thinking, time-management, and people skills, reading everything about the business to glean some insight from so many people on the web who are so much smarter and more experienced than I am, all in an attempt to better understand what it is I do. While I believe it is crucial for people to be knowledgeable of current affairs in their industries, I think my thirst for such knowledge had a more prescient motivation for doing this: At the root of it, I wanted to know why I was unhappy with my job.


I’ve noticed a rash of design professionals leaving their jobs lately to pursue creative freedom. Designer Frank Chimero, Helen Walters of BusinessWeek, Andrio Abero of Wieden+Kenndey, and Alex Bogusky of MDC Partners have all written high-profile accounts or made announcements about going on hiatus or quitting. There are countless others leaving both high-ranking positions as well as quieter corners. Is this an industry that is constantly in flux, or is there something to be said about all the ship-jumping? While each “adventurer” (a less patronizing title than “dreamer”) will have their own personal reasons, I can offer some insight into my own recent experience of striking out on my own.

How it started: The two year itch

Over the past year or two I’ve been busy. I’ve been reading up on creativity, motivation, process, design and art, and I’ve been weighing the lofty ideas of commercialism and environmentalism against each other. I’ve been trying to perfect my strategic thinking, time-management, and people skills, reading everything about the business to glean some insight from so many people on the web who are so much smarter and more experienced than I am, all in an attempt to better understand what it is I do. While I believe it is crucial for people to be knowledgeable of current affairs in their industries, I think my thirst for such knowledge had a more prescient motivation for doing this: At the root of it, I wanted to know why I was unhappy with my job. Leer más “How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love My Job – And Leave It”

The Chain of Experience: Jobs and Innovation

I enjoy it!

by Stefan Lindegaard

I really like this sentence – the chain of experience – as put forth by Andy Grove in the How to Make an American Job article in BusinessWeek.

Different Forms of Filtering Create Different Forms of Value by Tim Kastelle

Ethan Zuckerman wrote a very interesting post today called What if Search Drove Newspapers? He talks about several different initiatives designed to gauge readers’ interest in different news stories, particularly those that are currently under-reported, and then devising methods for reporting stories on these topics. He asserts (correctly, I think) that this is basically search-driven content development. In particular, this is a strategy that will work well with Google.


Fly or Die
Image by vaXzine via Flickr

Por jabaldaia

I enjoy it!

by Stefan Lindegaard

I really like this sentence – the chain of experience – as put forth by Andy Grove in the How to Make an American Job article in BusinessWeek.

Different Forms of Filtering Create Different Forms of Value by Tim Kastelle

Ethan Zuckerman wrote a very interesting post today called What if Search Drove Newspapers? He talks about several different initiatives designed to gauge readers’ interest in different news stories, particularly those that are currently under-reported, and then devising methods for reporting stories on these topics. He asserts (correctly, I think) that this is basically search-driven content development. In particular, this is a strategy that will work well with Google. Leer más “The Chain of Experience: Jobs and Innovation”