Digital Health

The digital revolution continues. Music, television, books, shopping, politics, and now… health care.

The health industry is poised to be next in the ever-growing list of industrial sectors to be transformed by digital technology.

Already there are electronic medical records, EKGs for smartphones, personal trainer apps, and calorie counters galore! But innovation in health care is booming as innovators launch applications and technologies that make health care more convenient, efficient, and affordable. Here are some of the key trends we see shaping up in the space.
1. Weight loss plans go digital.

Many of us are already familiar with the plethora of apps that promise to give us a healthier lifestyle. Motivational weight loss apps and calorie counters are in no short supply. Take, for example, Skimble’s Workout Trainer app that allows the user to follow along to professional workout routines using their mobile, iPad, or Apple TV.


by Audrey | http://anidea.com/news/digital-health/ The digital revolution 
continues.  Music, television, books, shopping, politics, 
and now… health care

The health industry is poised to be next in the ever-growing list of industrial sectors to be transformed by digital technology.

Already there are electronic medical records, EKGs for smartphones, personal trainer apps, and calorie counters galore! But innovation in health care is booming as innovators launch applications and technologies that make health care more convenient, efficient, and affordable. Here are some of the key trends we see shaping up in the space.

1. Weight loss plans go digital.

Many of us are already familiar with the plethora of apps that promise to give us a healthier lifestyle. Motivational weight loss apps and calorie counters are in no short supply. Take, for example, Skimble’s Workout Trainer app that allows the user to follow along to professional workout routines using their mobile, iPad, or Apple TV.

ski

Workout Trainer App

Fitbit, the new Nike+ Fuel Band, and Up by Jawbone are also capitalizing on this movement. All three devices monitor consumers’ energy and activity levels and upload the findings to their mobile device. The mobile apps help users keep track of the findings over time, inspiring people to live healthier lifestyles.

nike

What Kind of Freelancer are You?

* Jason Finnerty

How many times have you heard the old fable, the tortoise and the hare? Slow and steady wins the race. Right….

From what I’ve read here on FreelanceSwitch, it seems like most freelancers are hares – but they are frequently running more than one race at a time. I’ll be the first to admit that I’m in this camp, and I know that this isn’t necessarily a good thing. Whether my deadline is tomorrow or next Tuesday, I find a way to hit it, and sometimes I think it might be the panic factor that promotes the creativity. [Más…]

But I doubt that this is the only way. I’m sure it’s not the best way.

Kristen has shared a few tips here on how the clients can get quality results on rush projects, and Joel posted a poll to find out how the readers on FSw handle their deadlines.

What I would like to know is, what works best for you – slow and steady, one client at a time, or fast and furious, racing to the deadline? What tools do you use to keep yourself on track, without worrying about your ever-escalating blood pressure?


How many times have you heard the old fable, the tortoise and the hare?  Slow and steady wins the race.  Right….

From what I’ve read here on FreelanceSwitch, it seems like most freelancers are hares – but they are frequently running more than one race at a time.  I’ll be the first to admit that I’m in this camp, and I know that this isn’t necessarily a good thing. Whether my deadline is tomorrow or next Tuesday, I find a way to hit it, and sometimes I think it might be the panic factor that promotes the creativity. Leer más “What Kind of Freelancer are You?”

How to talk to someone you can’t stand

Dealing with braggarts, boors and the rest.

Matthew’s boss was inept and utterly irritating. As a way of starting conversations, the guy would ask if something he had just requested was finished yet. Then he’d laugh. Making matters worse, Matthew, a program manager at a software company, had to walk past his boss many times in a typical day – a recipe for daily discomfort, if not outright conflict.


CHRISTOPHER STEINER AND OLIVIA FOX CABANE, FORBES.COM

Man and a woman argue in an office.A difficult colleague can make a work place unbearable. Photo: iStock

Dealing with braggarts, boors and the rest.

Matthew’s boss was inept and utterly irritating. As a way of starting conversations, the guy would ask if something he had just requested was finished yet. Then he’d laugh. Making matters worse, Matthew, a program manager at a software company, had to walk past his boss many times in a typical day – a recipe for daily discomfort, if not outright conflict. Leer más “How to talk to someone you can’t stand”

How to talk to someone you can’t stand


CHRISTOPHER STEINER AND OLIVIA FOX CABANE, FORBES.COM

Man and a woman argue in an office.A difficult colleague can make a work place unbearable. Photo: iStock

Dealing with braggarts, boors and the rest.

Matthew’s boss was inept and utterly irritating. As a way of starting conversations, the guy would ask if something he had just requested was finished yet. Then he’d laugh. Making matters worse, Matthew, a program manager at a software company, had to walk past his boss many times in a typical day – a recipe for daily discomfort, if not outright conflict.

Matthew was a client of Dr Srini Pillay, a Harvard professor of psychiatry and chief executive of the Neurobusinessgroup, a consultancy that uses insights from the field of neuroscience to improve communications within organisations. Pillay came up with two survival tactics to avoid confrontation and ease Matthew’s pain.

The first, a kind of pre-emptive strike, involved sprinkling timely, innocuous compliments. “Nice shoes, Bill,” Matthew would say. Or, “Thanks for the memo, Bill, it was really helpful.” When spreading sweetness and light grew tiresome, Matthew would look for a third person or subject about which the two could find easy agreement: sports, music, food, even politics.

“Matthew was able to stop his boss in his tracks and derail him long enough to avoid listening to him,” says Pillay. “Without those strategies, he would not have been able to last at the company.”

Face it: some people are simply insufferable. With any luck, they can be avoided, but not always. So what do you do when there’s just no escape?

“Behave as though you are handling a poisonous snake,” says Dr Richard Pomerance, a Boston psychotherapist who has counselled executives at Harvard, Cisco and American Express on handling thorny personalities. “Survival is the most important goal.” Leer más “How to talk to someone you can’t stand”

Flexibility key to employee health


Reuters
Image via Wikipedia

Work stress.Stress test … workers with little control over their working conditions experience higher stress levels.

People who have some control over their working hours may be healthier in both mind and body than those in less flexible jobs, according to a US study.

Analysing 10 published studies involving about 16,600 workers, researchers found that certain work conditions that gave employees some control – such as self-scheduling shift work and gradual or partial retirement – were linked to health benefits.

Those benefits included lower blood pressure and heart rate, and better quality sleep and less fatigue during the day.

But the findings, published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, do not prove that flexible work schedules lead to better health although they support the theory that “control at work is good for health,” said the researchers.

Dr. Clare Bambra of Britain’s Durham University said according to that theory, reduced stress may be what bestows the benefits although there are other possibilities as well.

A flexible work schedule might, for instance, make it easier for people to find time for exercise, Bambra told Reuters Health.

For years, studies have found links between “high job strain” and heightened rates of heart disease, depression and other ills. Researchers define high job strain as work that is demanding but allows employees little to no control over how they work.

This has sparked increasing interest in whether there are health benefits to be gained from non-traditional work conditions like self-scheduling, “flextime,” telecommuting from home, and job sharing.

For their review, Bambra and her colleagues used 10 studies that all followed workers for at least six months and had to compare employees with flexible conditions with another group.

But Bambra said a shortcoming of all the studies in the review was that none was a randomized controlled trial.

Bambra said those types of studies “are needed before we can make any real conclusions. The data we have is indicative rather than definitive.”

But she said they found no evidence that flexible work conditions stand to harm employees’ well-being so for now employers and policy makers can consider self-scheduling and gradual retirement to be “plausible means” for promoting employee health.

Reuters

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