The End Of Free Media?

“We believe that serious media organizations must start to collect additional revenue from their readers … information is less and less yearning to be free.”

On the surface, this is worth exploring … after all, what media executive in their right mind would predict that people actually WANT to pay for media? Especially in an era where Chris Anderson famously declared in his Wired article and book that “the rise of “freeconomics” is being driven by the underlying technologies that power the Web.” Seeing information or even entertainment as bits and bytes of information, however, is too narrow of a view. When someone buys the NY Times or a magazine or a DVD -they are not only paying for the media itself, but rather the experience it offers them.


by Rohit Bhargavaimb_free_chrisanderson

What media would you actually pay to consume? That fundamental question is the most profound one driving all the discussion today about the future of media. Some believe the iPad and mobile tablet devices will reinvent how we read and consume media. Others feel this is just the latest in the overhyped and wholly exaggerated claims that old media is dying. At the recent International Newsroom Summit, The New York Timespublisher and chairman Arthur Sulzberger, Jr. stated that he eventually expects that The NY Times will no longer be a physical newspaper.

While he declined to forecast a date when this might happen, his words are being seen by many as a prediction of the inevitable demise of the printed word. Another statement in his talk has received less attention, but perhaps may demonstrate a much more profound realization about the future of media:

“We believe that serious media organizations must start to collect additional revenue from their readers … information is less and less yearning to be free.”

On the surface, this is worth exploring … after all, what media executive in their right mind would predict that people actually WANT to pay for media? Especially in an era where Chris Anderson famously declared in his Wired article and book that “the rise of “freeconomics” is being driven by the underlying technologies that power the Web.”  Seeing information or even entertainment as bits and bytes of information, however, is too narrow of a view. When someone buys the NY Times or a magazine or a DVD -they are not only paying for the media itself, but rather the experience it offers them. Leer más “The End Of Free Media?”

“Spicing” Up the Brand Personality

If you haven’t yet seen the Emmy winning Old Spice commercials in action and haven’t quoted the Old Spice Guy at least once in conversation over the past few months, you must be sleeping under a rock (well, okay, maybe only a few fanatics are actually quoting the commercials…).

Never-the-less, the Old Spice phenomenon has created a surge of conversation around virality and brand engagement with the online audience. But let’s talk about the brand personality, because – to me – that’s one of the main things that really made this campaign go big.

So, what makes a great brand personality? (let’s see)


by Kristin Parrish

If you haven’t yet seen the Emmy winning Old Spice commercials in action and haven’t quoted the Old Spice Guy at least once in conversation over the past few months, you must be sleeping under a rock (well, okay, maybe only a few fanatics are actually quoting the commercials…).

Never-the-less, the Old Spice phenomenon has created a surge of conversation around virality and brand engagement with the online audience. But let’s talk about the brand personality, because – to me – that’s one of the main things that really made this campaign go big.

So, what makes a great brand personality? (let’s see) Leer más ““Spicing” Up the Brand Personality”

Location is Now Part of the Social Graph — 3 Implications

According to Comscore, over 25 million users accessed Facebook via a mobile phone in Jan 2010, a 112% year-over-year increase.

With its initial US-based rollout of Places location functionality on the 30+ million iPhone installed base, Facebook joins Twitter and others in embracing the growing use of smartphones for social networking.

Importantly, this change allows Facebook to expand users’ social graphs beyond such items as friends, product/service affinities and demographics to now include location.

Here are three thoughts on implications for marketers, agencies and social location startups:

Location checkins should help drive impulse and, to some extent, planned purchases. It’s clear that coupons, discounts and other promotions will be important for increasing share of wallet — particularly for the impulse purchases estimated to account for 20+% of consumer spending. Companies like Shopkick are already implementing functionality to enable this, and it’s clearly going to be of value in driving revenue for a wide range of companies.


Graph

by Irfan Kamal

According to Comscore, over 25 million users accessed Facebook via a mobile phone in Jan 2010, a 112% year-over-year increase.

With its initial US-based rollout of Places location functionality on the 30+ million iPhone installed base, Facebook joins Twitter and others in embracing the growing use of smartphones for social networking.

Importantly, this change allows Facebook to expand users’ social graphs beyond such items as friends, product/service affinities and demographics to now include location.

Here are three thoughts on implications for marketers, agencies and social location startups:

Location checkins should help drive impulse and, to some extent, planned purchases. It’s clear that coupons, discounts and other promotions will be important for increasing share of wallet — particularly for the impulse purchases estimated to account for 20+% of consumer spending. Companies like Shopkick are already implementing functionality to enable this, and it’s clearly going to be of value in driving revenue for a wide range of companies. Leer más “Location is Now Part of the Social Graph — 3 Implications”

Digital Influence Ogilvy Exchange on Government

Next month, the Digital Influence team will be partnering with others at Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide to bring you an Ogilvy Exchange on Government. The working title of the event: How Social Media Tools are Shaping Government, the 2010 Elections and Issue Campaigns.

In 2008, the Obama administration swept into the White House in large part transported on the wings of the Netroots – the fundraising and voter mobilization of his online supporters was unprecedented. With this administration came the ideals of the Open Gov Directive and Gov 2.0: transparent, participatory government. Two years later we can’t help but ask the following questions:

What happened to the momentum?

Does it still exist?

How has it evolved?

Are these ideals being fulfilled in government?

What are some of the best, innovative case studies of what is possible in this space?

What does the future hold?

What do the Administration, the media and the campaign stakeholders think is next for 2010 and 2012?

How is the next generation of political advocates going to bring together social media to create a movement, to raise money, to organize locally, to fight opposition campaigns and to get out the vote?

Will the Republicans be able to capitalize on this power as well as the Democrats?

We realize that this topic is vast and one that will take several conversations to cover. Consequently, we are hopeful that this Ogilvy Exchange will be the first of many where we begin to discuss these questions. In parallel, the 360Di team is launching a series of blog posts on government that we hope to publish on a weekly basis to continue to explore this topic in a more thorough manner.


Next month, the Digital Influence team will be partnering with others at Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide to bring you an Ogilvy Exchange on Government. The working title of the event: How Social Media Tools are Shaping Government, the 2010 Elections and Issue Campaigns.

In 2008, the Obama administration swept into the White House in large part transported on the wings of the Netroots – the fundraising and voter mobilization of his online supporters was unprecedented. With this administration came the ideals of the Open Gov Directive and Gov 2.0: transparent, participatory government. Two years later we can’t help but ask the following questions:

What happened to the momentum?

Does it still exist?

How has it evolved?

Are these ideals being fulfilled in government?

What are some of the best, innovative case studies of what is possible in this space?

What does the future hold?

What do the Administration, the media and the campaign stakeholders think is next for 2010 and 2012?

How is the next generation of political advocates going to bring together social media to create a movement, to raise money, to organize locally, to fight opposition campaigns and to get out the vote?

Will the Republicans be able to capitalize on this power as well as the Democrats?

We realize that this topic is vast and one that will take several conversations to cover. Consequently, we are hopeful that this Ogilvy Exchange will be the first of many where we begin to discuss these questions. In parallel, the 360Di team is launching a series of blog posts on government that we hope to publish on a weekly basis to continue to explore this topic in a more thorough manner. Leer más “Digital Influence Ogilvy Exchange on Government”

The Blogger’s Perspective: Avoiding Common Pitfalls During Blogger Engagement

I came to Ogilvy 360 DI — and social media strategy — via a slightly different route than most of my colleagues. In short, I was a longtime blogger (and journo) who’d become frustrated at how poorly blog outreach was being handled by brands that, under any other circumstance, would’ve been impeccable with their approach. They’d finessed relationships with the press and customers, but when it came to bloggers, they ended up botching it completely (clunky outreach, poor planning, uneven execution) — and as a result, not capitalizing on all that blogs and social media could offer. Ogilvy was the first place I saw that truly got that blogger relationships were not a one-size-fits-all kind of endeavor. I signed on for the job.

Even though I’m now at Ogilvy, I’m still a blogger — my fashion blog, FashionisSpinach.com, has been tapped for a wide number of influencer campaigns for brands like Chanel and Gucci — and I’m still the target for many brands stepping into the social media sphere. Not a day goes by when I’m not completely amazed at how companies try to use clunky PR methods to reach out to bloggers like me.

Here are three of my most frequently seen pitfalls.


pitfall

by Betsy Lowther

I came to Ogilvy 360 DI — and social media strategy — via a slightly different route than most of my colleagues. In short, I was a longtime blogger (and journo) who’d become frustrated at how poorly blog outreach was being handled by brands that, under any other circumstance, would’ve been impeccable with their approach. They’d finessed relationships with the press and customers, but when it came to bloggers, they ended up botching it completely (clunky outreach, poor planning, uneven execution) — and as a result, not capitalizing on all that blogs and social media could offer. Ogilvy was the first place I saw that truly got that blogger relationships were not a one-size-fits-all kind of endeavor. I signed on for the job.

Even though I’m now at Ogilvy, I’m still a blogger — my fashion blog, FashionisSpinach.com, has been tapped for a wide number of influencer campaigns for brands like Chanel and Gucci — and I’m still the target for many brands stepping into the social media sphere. Not a day goes by when I’m not completely amazed at how companies try to use clunky PR methods to reach out to bloggers like me.

Here are three of my most frequently seen pitfalls. Leer más “The Blogger’s Perspective: Avoiding Common Pitfalls During Blogger Engagement”

What is your story? Facebook likes to hear!

What is “Facebook Stories”?

This July, Facebook announced that it had passed the 500 million user milestone. Along with this announcement, Facebook also rolled out a new application, “Facebook Stories,” to celebrate its achievement. As the largest social network in the world, stories of how people are interacting with others on Facebook happen every day. However, these stories usually end up only on Facebook Status Updates and News Feed, where limited users (i.e.friends) can access.

By launching Facebook Stories, users are able to share their unique stories in a collective environment, and all users can read these stories searchable by location or theme. Themes cover a variety of topics such as education, relationships, reunions, love etc. and after reading a couple stories, I would add some are quite inspiring and mind-opening. While various people use Facebook to keep in touch with old friends, others have clearly allowed Facebook to become a part of their lives.


fbstory1

by Kevin Ti

What is “Facebook Stories”?

This July, Facebook announced that it had passed the 500 million user milestone. Along with this announcement, Facebook also rolled out a new application, “Facebook Stories,” to celebrate its achievement.  As the largest social network in the world, stories of how people are interacting with others on Facebook happen every day. However, these stories usually end up only on Facebook Status Updates and News Feed, where limited users (i.e.friends) can access.

By launching Facebook Stories, users are able to share their unique stories in a collective environment, and all users can read these stories searchable by location or theme. Themes cover a variety of topics such as education, relationships, reunions, love etc. and after reading a couple stories, I would add some are quite inspiring and mind-opening. While various people use Facebook to keep in touch with old friends, others have clearly allowed Facebook to become a part of their lives. Leer más “What is your story? Facebook likes to hear!”

Social Media is Getting Schooled

by Blake Bowyer

Of the sectors throwing caution to the wind and making social media integral to long-term communications plans, I perceive higher education as dragging its feet. Fresh off graduation, I can still smell the ink drying on hastily-minted digital plans for universities of all sizes and ilk. That’s why I was surprised after a recent finding from the Society for New Communications Research: higher education is outpacing the Fortune 500 in social media adoption by more than 2 to 1.

We must consider such inferences carefully. The deeper one digs into the study, the more context must be added. In one instance, researchers found 95% of schools use at least one platform to recruit. While the for-profit equivalent of recruiting is acquiring new customers, social media serve many more functions in both sectors. In education, uses include informing current students, communicating with alumni, and promoting curricula, courses, and extracurriculars internally, among countless others.

The study’s broad statements must be examined carefully and, while the rate of adoption may be high, it may not translate to effectiveness. Social media shouldn’t be drooled over solely for external promotion and recruiting, but also for opportunities to create an enriching stakeholder experience. For example, Harvard University has been an early adopter in its use of social platforms to welcome guests with campus tips on foursquare, serve diverse audiences on Twitter, and provide students resources to get involved via Facebook.

“Well, that’s freakin’ Harvard!” one might say. Sure, but it could be any university with the strategic insight to serve disparate audiences through social media. While not every institution can offer a custom foursquare badge to visitors, it can bring a campus, its students, and the community to life with a fuller interactive, multimedia presence. Obviously it’s no cakewalk and schools must address four fundamental uncertainties that inhibit effective use of social media in higher education:


by Blake Bowyer

Of the sectors throwing caution to the wind and making social media integral to long-term communications plans, I perceive higher education as dragging its feet. Fresh off graduation, I can still smell the ink drying on hastily-minted digital plans for universities of all sizes and ilk. That’s why I was surprised after a recent finding from the Society for New Communications Research: higher education is outpacing the Fortune 500 in social media adoption by more than 2 to 1.

We must consider such inferences carefully. The deeper one digs into the study, the more context must be added. In one instance, researchers found 95% of schools use at least one platform to recruit. While the for-profit equivalent of recruiting is acquiring new customers, social media serve many more functions in both sectors. In education, uses include informing current students, communicating with alumni, and promoting curricula, courses, and extracurriculars internally, among countless others.

The study’s broad statements must be examined carefully and, while the rate of adoption may be high, it may not translate to effectiveness. Social media shouldn’t be drooled over solely for external promotion and recruiting, but also for opportunities to create an enriching stakeholder experience. For example, Harvard University has been an early adopter in its use of social platforms to welcome guests with campus tips on foursquare, serve diverse audiences on Twitter, and provide students resources to get involved via Facebook.

“Well, that’s freakin’ Harvard!” one might say. Sure, but it could be any university with the strategic insight to serve disparate audiences through social media. While not every institution can offer a custom foursquare badge to visitors, it can bring a campus, its students, and the community to life with a fuller interactive, multimedia presence. Obviously it’s no cakewalk and schools must address four fundamental uncertainties that inhibit effective use of social media in higher education: Leer más “Social Media is Getting Schooled”

TGIF: Farewell to Facebook Gifts and to TGIF (For a While)

Facebook often has the luxury of refining ideas that have been around a while and that is what I predict for payments over Facebook. People are already comfortable with entering their credit card info on websites so payments on Facebook won’t seem like a huge leap; here I will review a few of the most recent trends in currency and the opportunities for brands.

* The End of Facebook Gifts (Kind Of)- This Sunday, August 1st is the last day that the Gift Shop will be open. Gifts already circulated will remain on your profile forever and gifts can still be part of third-party applications; however, this is a good indication of where Facebook thinks gifts are going. In the future brands will most likely reward fans with virtual credit to play games or gift specifically tied to coupons or other exclusives. If you want to send your college roommate a tequila shot, sticky note, or unicorn you better get it in before Sunday!


tgif41

by Nicole Landguth

Facebook often has the luxury of refining ideas that have been around a while and that is what I predict for payments over Facebook. People are already comfortable with entering their credit card info on websites so payments on Facebook won’t seem like a huge leap; here I will review a few of the most recent trends in currency and the opportunities for brands.

  • The End of Facebook Gifts (Kind Of)- This Sunday, August 1st is the last day that the Gift Shop will be open. Gifts already circulated will remain on your profile forever and gifts can still be part of third-party applications; however, this is a good indication of where Facebook thinks gifts are going. In the future brands will most likely reward fans with virtual credit to play games or gift specifically tied to coupons or other exclusives. If you want to send your college roommate a tequila shot, sticky note, or unicorn you better get it in before Sunday!

Leer más “TGIF: Farewell to Facebook Gifts and to TGIF (For a While)”

Top Chef and Top Chef Masters finales

Who doesn’t love a dramatic finale to a TV series? I’m particularly partial to Top Chef and Top Chef Masters finales where finalists on both shows are often faced with the challenge of preparing a complicated bevy of courses intended to tell stories about who they are as chefs. Such challenges speak to favorite childhood memories and what inspired contestants to become professional chefs. The personal stories are often incredibly moving and include pictures and/or videos of the chefs as children and in their first professional kitchens.


Who doesn’t love a dramatic finale to a TV series? I’m particularly partial to Top Chef and Top Chef Masters finales where finalists on both shows are often faced with the challenge of preparing a complicated bevy of courses intended to tell stories about who they are as chefs. Such challenges speak to favorite childhood memories and what inspired contestants to become professional chefs. The personal stories are often incredibly moving and include pictures and/or videos of the chefs as children and in their first professional kitchens.

Leer más “Top Chef and Top Chef Masters finales”

5 correlations between a digital strategist and a game show contestant

In late 2010 I was a contestant on “Let’s Make a Deal.” It was one of the most popular television game shows of the 1960’s and 1970’s and now it’s making a comeback. I was on vacation in Las Vegas when I attended a taping that I will remember forever. It wasn’t until recent that I realized all the correlations between being a digital strategist and a game show contestant. Here are five ways being a digital strategist helped me win big:


In late 2010 I was a contestant on “Let’s Make a Deal.” It was one of the most popular television game shows of the 1960’s and 1970’s and now it’s making a comeback. I was on vacation in Las Vegas when I attended a taping that I will remember forever. It wasn’t until recent that I realized all the correlations between being a digital strategist and a game show contestant. Here are five ways being a digital strategist helped me win big: Leer más “5 correlations between a digital strategist and a game show contestant”

5 correlations between a digital strategist and a game show contestant

by Brian Camen

In late 2010 I was a contestant on “Let’s Make a Deal.” It was one of the most popular television game shows of the 1960’s and 1970’s and now it’s making a comeback. I was on vacation in Las Vegas when I attended a taping that I will remember forever. It wasn’t until recent that I realized all the correlations between being a digital strategist and a game show contestant. Here are five ways being a digital strategist helped me win big:
1. Make a plan. I’ve always been fascinated by game shows, and why some people seem to be more successful than others. I watched tapings to try to analyze the different games. If only I was as smart as Michael Larson who won $110,237 on a game show in 1984. The digital world consists of planning and strategizing for brands as well. Brands need to listen to the conversations about themselves before participating. Both game show contestants and brands can not afford to skip the planning stage.


by Brian Camen

In late 2010 I was a contestant on “Let’s Make a Deal.” It was one of the most popular television game shows of the 1960’s and 1970’s and now it’s making a comeback. I was on vacation in Las Vegas when I attended a taping that I will remember forever. It wasn’t until recent that I realized all the correlations between being a digital strategist and a game show contestant. Here are five ways being a digital strategist helped me win big:

1. Make a plan. I’ve always been fascinated by game shows, and why some people seem to be more successful than others. I watched tapings to try to analyze the different games. If only I was as smart as Michael Larson who won $110,237 on a game show in 1984. The digital world consists of planning and strategizing for brands as well. Brands need to listen to the conversations about themselves before participating. Both game show contestants and brands can not afford to skip the planning stage. Leer más “5 correlations between a digital strategist and a game show contestant”

Looking to reach consumers in the healthcare space? Consider tuning into YouTube

A prominent trend over the past few years has been the massive growth of the online video sharing platform YouTube. Consumers have been turning to YouTube more and more, which is demonstrated by its becoming the second most popular search engine in April, behind its parent, Google.[i] What I find most interesting is how consumers are using YouTube.

YouTube has shed its reputation of being strictly an entertainment site. Sure, people still tune in to see popular videos such as David after the dentist, the wedding entrance dance to Chris Brown’s Forever, and the most recent Lady Gaga video (who still has the most viewed videos on YouTube as of this posting), but recent data show s consumer are also turning to YouTube for health information, providing new opportunities for healthcare providers and pharmaceutical companies to engage patients, caregivers and even prescribers.


by Kevin Silverman

A prominent trend over the past few years has been the massive growth of the online video sharing platform YouTube. Consumers have been turning to YouTube more and more, which is demonstrated by its becoming the second most popular search engine in April, behind its parent, Google.[i] What I find most interesting is how consumers are using YouTube.

YouTube has shed its reputation of being strictly an entertainment site. Sure, people still tune in  to see popular videos such as David after the dentist, the wedding entrance dance to Chris Brown’s Forever, and the most recent Lady Gaga video (who still has the most viewed videos on YouTube as of this posting), but recent data show s consumer are also turning to YouTube for health information, providing new opportunities for healthcare providers and pharmaceutical companies to engage patients, caregivers and even prescribers. Leer más “Looking to reach consumers in the healthcare space? Consider tuning into YouTube”

Introducing the Sweet Spot: Latinos/Hispanics and Web 2.0

Latinos and Hispanics in Web 2.o are in the sweet spot. Over the course of the last few days, whether it be at Netroots Nation in Las Vegas, the Bridge Conference in the beltway or within Ogilvy’s own LatinRed professional network during an event in New York City, I have found myself in conversations with various folks talking about the opportunity found in engaging this demographic online here in the States.

So what is the opportunity? [Más…]

At the end of last year and beginning of this year, I was thrilled to see a couple of recent studies that provided a quantitative backing to what I and others in the industry have been saying for years. Latinos are in Social Media.

According to a report released by the Pew Hispanic Center and the Pew Internet & American Life Project in December of 2009, internet use among Latino adults rose by 10 percentage points from 54% to 64% between 2006- 2008. In comparison, the rates for whites rose four percentage points, and the rates for blacks rose only two percentage points during that time period.

A recent report published by AOL and Cheskin states that the number of Hispanics online has grown faster than the growth of the total US population. Two similarly striking findings of this report are that Latinos have more confidence in online product rating sites than their friends’ opinions (78%: 28%) and that they are earlier adopters of technology, more so than general market users.

Moreover, the AOL and Cheskin report found the percentage of bloggers in the Latino community to be at 21%.

So what does all this mean?


Latinos and Hispanics in Web 2.o are in the sweet spot. Over the course of the last few days, whether it be at Netroots Nation in Las Vegas, the Bridge Conference in the beltway or within Ogilvy’s own LatinRed professional network during an event in New York City, I have found myself in conversations with various folks talking about the opportunity found in engaging this demographic online here in the States.

So what is the opportunity? Leer más “Introducing the Sweet Spot: Latinos/Hispanics and Web 2.0”

The Value of a Leader: Mayo Clinic’s New Center for Social Media

This week, the Mayo Clinic announced the launch of its very own Center for Social Media – a first-of-its-kind social media center focused on health care. “Through this center we intend to lead the health care community in applying these revolutionary tools to spread knowledge and encourage collaboration among providers, improving health care quality everywhere” said Mayo Clinic president and CEO John Noseworthy, MD.

This announcement is a great step in the further acceptance and application of social media to advance patient health, and it got me thinking about the concept of leadership.

Leadership can be defined as “a process whereby an individual (or organization, in this case) influences a group of individuals to achieve a common goal [Northouse, 2007].” Whether that leader is an official one, such as a trade association or federal agency, or an informal influencer, we all look to leaders for guidance and validation that we are doing the right thing.

Given the complex nature of health care communication, the value that Mayo Clinic’s new Center will provide is in its role as the formal leader – or champion – for the health care community. They have the opportunity to step up and help institutions considering stepping into the space feel confident that they can trust the Mayo Clinic to lead them in the right direction. The ways that I see the Mayo Clinic can best do this is S.H.A.R.E.

* Showcase the value of integrating social media into health care through analyzing and assessing their own efforts.
* Harness their position as an existing leader to cast a wide influence in the health care community.
* Arm others with the resources needed to implement social media programs – resources are often one of the main reasons that organizations like health care facilities shy away from social media.
* Rally the health care community to work together towards a common goal by serving as the convener of conversation on the subject.
* Educate through a structured and centralized on-demand curriculum specific to their needs that health care facilities would not have access to otherwise.


by Chris Heydt

take-me-to-your-leader

This week, the Mayo Clinic announced the launch of its very own Center for Social Media – a first-of-its-kind social media center focused on health care. “Through this center we intend to lead the health care community in applying these revolutionary tools to spread knowledge and encourage collaboration among providers, improving health care quality everywhere” said Mayo Clinic president and CEO John Noseworthy, MD.

This announcement is a great step in the further acceptance and application of social media to advance patient health, and it got me thinking about the concept of leadership.

Leadership can be defined as “a process whereby an individual (or organization, in this case) influences a group of individuals to achieve a common goal [Northouse, 2007].” Whether that leader is an official one, such as a trade association or federal agency, or an informal influencer, we all look to leaders for guidance and validation that we are doing the right thing.

Given the complex nature of health care communication, the value that Mayo Clinic’s new Center will provide is in its role as the formal leader – or champion – for the health care community. They have the opportunity to step up and help institutions considering stepping into the space feel confident that they can trust the Mayo Clinic to lead them in the right direction. The ways that I see the Mayo Clinic can best do this is S.H.A.R.E.

  • Showcase the value of integrating social media into health care through analyzing and assessing their own efforts.
  • Harness their position as an existing leader to cast a wide influence in the health care community.
  • Arm others with the resources needed to implement social media programs – resources are often one of the main reasons that organizations like health care facilities shy away from social media.
  • Rally the health care community to work together towards a common goal by serving as the convener of conversation on the subject.
  • Educate through a structured and centralized on-demand curriculum specific to their needs that health care facilities would not have access to otherwise. Leer más “The Value of a Leader: Mayo Clinic’s New Center for Social Media”

Report: 8 Success Criteria for Facebook Page Marketing

Recently we contributed to a report from Jeremiah Owyang and crew over at Altimeter. They just released it last week and we would like to share it here. They drew conclusions from a variety of sources to end up with the “8 Criteria” – most of which I agree with and find useful. They then go on to “grade” a couple of dozen brands in terms of their overall “maturity” in Facebook marketing. Here are the 8 Criteria:

* Set Community Expectations
* Provide Cohesive Branding
* Be Up To Date
* Live Authenticity
* Participate in Dialog
* Enable Peer-to-Peer Interactions
* Foster Advocacy
* Solicit a Call-to-Action

Forget my knee-jerk objection to using what sounds like such paternalistic terms (”maturity,” ” infantile,” etc…) there is some sense here…

Success in this space comes with experience. You can read all the blog posts and reports you want but until you are trying to activate in Facebook, you will never accrue enough learning and, I guess, maturity.


by John Bell

Recently we contributed to a report from Jeremiah Owyang and crew over at Altimeter. They just released it last week and we would like to share it here. They drew conclusions from a variety of sources to end up with the “8 Criteria” – most of which I agree with and find useful. They then go on to “grade” a couple of dozen brands in terms of their overall “maturity” in Facebook marketing.  Here are the 8 Criteria:

  • Set Community Expectations
  • Provide Cohesive Branding
  • Be Up To Date
  • Live Authenticity
  • Participate in Dialog
  • Enable Peer-to-Peer Interactions
  • Foster Advocacy
  • Solicit a Call-to-Action

Forget my knee-jerk objection to using what sounds like such paternalistic terms (”maturity,” ” infantile,” etc…)  there is some sense here…

Success in this space comes with experience. You can read all the blog posts and reports you want but until you are trying to activate in Facebook, you will never accrue enough learning and, I guess, maturity.

Ranking is Transitory

I do object to their ranking of the brands. A simple spot-check makes me question it. Last week, we launched the reinvented Ford Explorer via Facebook and it was an awesome experience and a talk about “maturity.”  Ford has been adding to its social media work with influencers with a terrific approach to social grassroots via Facebook. Ford should be higher but perhaps its all too new to be in the report, after all it takes time to write a 26-page document.

Lots of useful stuff here.

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