Social Media 2013 Benchmark Report infographic – thnxz @MarketingB2B :)


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Download the Social Data Demystification & Best Practice


#SocialData — Demystified! New IABlog post by Patrick Dolan, IAB

IAB’s Data Council just rolled out a new report—Social Data: Demystification & Best Practice—that can give companies and marketers a sturdier starting point for understanding and making better use of this growing mass of information and its power to positively influence millions of people through social amplification.

social-tradanalyticsvssocialdataanalytics.JPGSocial data that haven’t existed in traditional digital media analytic channels (Social Data: Demystification and Best Practice, IAB)

Social Data flows from a million directions. For example, many online marketers are using trackable URLs when posting to social media. These allow you to see exactly where your traffic and customers come from. Another popular social media tool allows you to add a share button wherever you need one on your website—a tool that creates data about who comes to your site, when and why. Of course social media sites themselves also generate masses of social data for you to use. All in all, just like other entities that are growing their online community, we at IAB use Social Data analysis tools, to see where our offerings are strong and to get feedback that helps us reach unexplored audiences. Leer más “Download the Social Data Demystification & Best Practice”

SCRUM: The Story of an Agile Team | Nettuts+ | Recomm reading


 

BY 
Nettuts+

Scrum is one of the most heavily used agile techniques. It’s not about coding; instead, it focuses on organization and project management. If you have a few moments, let me tell you about the team I work with, and how we adopted Scrum techniques.


A Little History

Scrum’s roots actually extend beyond the Agile era.

Scrum’s roots actually extend beyond the Agile era. The first mention of this technique can be found in 1986, by Hirotaka Takeuchi and Ikujiro Nonaka, for commercial product development. The first official paper defining Scrum, written by Jeff Sutherland and Ken Schwaber, was presented in 1995.

Scrum’s popularity grew shortly after the 2001 publication of the Agile Manifesto, as well as the book Agile Software Development with Scrum, coauthored by Ken Schwaber and Mike Beedle.


A Few Facts

Scrum defines a set of recommendations, which teams are encouraged to follow. It also defines several actors – or roles, if you prefer that terminology – together with an iterative process of production and periodical planning. There are several tools, which accommodate the Scrum process. I will reference a few in this article, but the most powerful tools are the white board and sticky notes.

There is not, and never will be, a list of “Scrum Best Practices,” because team and project context trumps all other considerations. — Mike Cohn

The Roles

Everything starts with the pig and the chicken. The chicken asks the pig if he is interested in jointly opening a restaurant. The chicken says they could call it, “Ham-and-Eggs.” The pig answers, “No thanks. I’d be committed, but you’d only be involved!

That’s Scrum! It specifies a concrete set of roles, which are divided into two groups:

  • Committed – those directly responsible for production and delivery of the final product. These roles include the team as a whole, its members, the scrum master, and the product owner.
  • Involved – represents the other people interested in the project, but who aren’t taking an active or direct part in the production and delivery processes. These roles are typically stakeholders and managers.

This is How We Started

Everything depends on dedication and good will. If you want your team to be efficient, productive, and deliver on time, you need someone to embrace some form of Agile techniques. Scrum may or may not be ideal for you, but it is surely one of the best places to start. Find that someone on your team who is willing to help the others, or you, yourself, can take on the responsibility of introducing Scrum.

You may ask why you should care how another team, like mine, does Scrum. You should care because we all learn how to do Scrum better by hearing stories of how it has been done by others – especially those who are doing it well. – Mike Cohn

The talented team I work with already knew a lot about Agile. We switched from Waterfall development to a more agile process, and released quite frequently. We successfully managed to release every three to six months, having a decently low number of bugs after each release.

But, still, we were far from what we can achieve today. We missed the process, or rules, that would force us to change our perspective on the product and process. That was the moment when our team manager introduced us to Scrum, a term we, at that time, had never heard of.

This person took the role of the Scrum Master.

The Scrum Master Leer más “SCRUM: The Story of an Agile Team | Nettuts+ | Recomm reading”

E-books PDF courtesy by ioninteractive.com


Learn how to use landing page software in tandem with your current marketing automation solution for exceptional results.

Integrating LiveBall with your marketing automation solution can help you to generate results unlike anything that you could achieve singly. In this guide, you’ll learn how to leverage the Power of Two to create a wider variety of better experience with less effort, more sophistication, greater insights, and streamlined testing.

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50 Landing Page Best Practices

The Ultimate Guide to Effective Landing Pages

From templates to testing and everything in between, this jam-packed best practices manual contains 50 expert tips and strategies for building the best landing pages.

You’ll gain valuable insights such as how to integrate your landing experience with a post-conversion audience, and how to build audience-specific landing pages. In addition, we’re revealing a trove of testing strategies, including which elements are most important to test on your pages.

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Landing Page Toolkit

This workbook takes you step-by-step from creating landing pages to optimizing them for high-conversion. Learn strategies for testing, segmenting, and messaging success. We even included extra workpages for future use. Read the toolkit and start making high-performance pages today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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About ion
Scalable, Agile Landing Page Optimization & Management

Marketers spend a lot to win clicks. We think every one of those clicks should lead to a great experience. Our cloud-based platform, LiveBall is used by hundreds of global brands to create and optimize post-click web experiences. We also offer a wide-range of strategic services for companies who need help in the planning, executing and optimizing of their post-click programs.

  • Born of Market Demand
  • Built for the Future
  • Designed to Deliver Results
  • Priced & Packaged to Grow with You
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  • Unlike Anything Else

 

 

 

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How To Do SEO. A Simple Starter Guide. Vía plainsimpleseo.com


A simple language, easy to follow,
basic starter guide to Search Engine Optimisation (SEO).

http://plainsimpleseo.com/

 

SEO GuidePt 0.Intro.

Introducing The SEO Guide.

This free SEO guide is designed to give you best practice advice on how to optimise your site for search engines.

Rumour and speculation dominate so many aspects of SEO. These myths and mystery have managed to taint the reputation of the search marketing industry, giving the impression that it’s worthless. This is a great shame.

I used to think SEO was worthless; something bolted on to a site when it went live, but I’ve since learned that there’s far more to it.

Those who know me will pay testament to my cynicism, but I can’t stress enough how misunderstood SEO is.

Used well, SEO can seriously improve your site’s performance in search rankings, and subsequently boost your site traffic (and sales) to great effect.

I am going to cover the basics of SEO. It should be all of what you need to know, and is all based on fact and research (gathered since starting work atQueryClick). Unlike many other SEO guides, none of this advice is based on speculation or hearsay.

Contents.

Part 1 is split in to 4 sections:

  1. 10%of the SEO mix.Technical SEOSite access, page speed, visibility and content duplication.
  2. 35%of the SEO mix.On Page SEOKeyphrase balance, code tags, page elements and retention.
  3. 55%of the SEO mix.Link BuildingInbound links, link relevance and social media.
  4. Other ElementsA few other things to bear in mind while optimising for search.

Before We Get Too Deep… Leer más “How To Do SEO. A Simple Starter Guide. Vía plainsimpleseo.com”

landerapp – Crea una Landing Page profesional sin saber programar ni diseñar

Con ella podemos diseñar páginas de presentación usando plantillas, crear formularios, integrar todas las redes sociales y sistemas de CRM, y, a mi ver lo más importante: realizar tests A/B para determinar cuál de los diseños elegidos es el más efectivo.

La versión gratuita permite hasta 500 visitas al mes, aunque podéis usar el código LanderTW183 para obtener un 80% de descuento, teniendo una validez de 6 meses y pudiendo ser usado hasta en 100 cuentas (es aplicable hasta el 31/05/2012).

Una excelente alternativa al conocido unbounce.com


 | wwwhatsnew.com

Tener una página de presentación de un proyecto aún no abierto es extremadamente importante en una realidad en la que los usuarios beta son fundamentales para obtener un feedback en el momento adecuado: antes del lanzamiento general.

Actualmente existen varias soluciones que permiten tener una Landing Page en pocos minutos, aunque pocas de ellas permiten la flexibilidad y personalización de esta herramienta que nos presentan hoy: landerapp.com  Leer más “landerapp – Crea una Landing Page profesional sin saber programar ni diseñar”

Landing Pages 3.0: How Content & Context Plays A More Meaningful Role

Most of the fields on the form were required. The “submit” button was still in vogue. And the payoff for filling out the form? A phone call from a sales rep.

Okay, so this first generation of landing pages wasn’t very good. But such pages were effective enough in lead generation that they got the ball rolling. Marketers started to wonder what they could do to make landing pages better.
Landing Pages 2.0: The Beginning Of Best Practices

To me, 2008 was the year when a new generation of landing pages took off — call it Landing Pages 2.0.

Two great books came out that year, Landing Page Optimization by Tim Ash and Always Be Testing by Bryan Eisenberg, and launched what I would characterize as the “best practices” era of landing pages.

Best practices were things that everyone using landing pages could — or should — follow. They included:

A/B and multivariate (MVT) testing — test, test, test your ideas
“message match” continuity between ads/emails and their landing pages
shorter and friendlier forms with better calls-to-action (CTAs)
emphasis on text content (not Flash!) to improve SEO and quality scores
“social proof” with logos, awards, certifications, testimonials, etc.

A year and a half ago, I put together the READY Conversion Optimization Framework as a broad summary of the most universal landing page best practices of the time:


by  | http://searchengineland.com

Landing pages have evolved a lot over the past five years.

Back in 2007, landing pages were almost cliché — what I would call Landing Pages 1.0. Take this example from Google — yes, Google — with the prototypical structure: a headline, a short description or some bullets, a small image (“hero shot”), and a form.

A Google landing page in 2007 Leer más “Landing Pages 3.0: How Content & Context Plays A More Meaningful Role”

Social Media White Paper – Learn and Earn

Ever since Microsoft Advertising adCenter was launched into beta back in 2005, the team has been supporting advertisers all over the world through the Microsoft Advertising Community site by blogging, answering questions in our forums, and disseminating news, tips, tricks and best practices more recently on Twitter @Microsoft adCenter and @MSAdvertising, and through our Facebook page.

With so many digital marketers using social networks and online applications to gather information, it made a lot of sense for us to invest in providing the very best insight into our products and services via the web.

A driving force at many industry events, the team also spends many hours every year at conferences, bringing sessions alive through social media for our fans and followers who may not have been able to attend.


http://advertising.microsoft.com

-.-
Social Media White Paper

Social Media White Paper

The Microsoft Advertising Community team has been engaging with our customers online through social media marketing for nearly five years.

Ever since Microsoft Advertising adCenter was launched into beta back in 2005, the team has been supporting advertisers all over the world through the Microsoft Advertising Community site by blogging, answering questions in our forums, and disseminating news, tips, tricks and best practices more recently on Twitter @Microsoft adCenter and @MSAdvertising, and through our Facebook page.

With so many digital marketers using social networks and online applications to gather information, it made a lot of sense for us to invest in providing the very best insight into our products and services via the web.

A driving force at many industry events, the team also spends many hours every year at conferences, bringing sessions alive through social media for our fans and followers who may not have been able to attend. Leer más “Social Media White Paper – Learn and Earn”

Shaping the Future: 7 Predictions for the Creative Community

At the start of every year, it’s fun to think about what’s next. However, for the creative professional community, considering the future is not just a casual exercise. It’s a necessity. The creative industries are rapidly changing, as is the way we manage our own creative careers.Do you rely on the web for inspiration, feedback, or any other part of your creative process? Do you rely on online networks or websites as a source of new customers, clients, or collaborations? Are you involved in the worlds of advertising, design, fine art, or any other industry that ultimately relies on matching the right creative talent with the best opportunities?

If you answered yes, get ready.


At the start of every year, it’s fun to think about what’s next. However, for the creative professional community, considering the future is not just a casual exercise. It’s a necessity. The creative industries are rapidly changing, as is the way we manage our own creative careers.Do you rely on the web for inspiration, feedback, or any other part of your creative process? Do you rely on online networks or websites as a source of new customers, clients, or collaborations? Are you involved in the worlds of advertising, design, fine art, or any other industry that ultimately relies on matching the right creative talent with the best opportunities?

If you answered yes, get ready. Leer más “Shaping the Future: 7 Predictions for the Creative Community”

Looking Beyond the Breakthrough Idea

While adopting crowdsourcing for innovation certainly can lead to breakthrough ideas, solutions and crowd efforts, I believe there is too much focus on the breakthrough and not enough value assigned to the many other benefits of engaging your stakeholders using crowdsoucing methods. In fact, even if a breakthrough is unlikely, there are still ample reasons to begin crowdsourcing. Here are a few:

Seed concepts: If you are looking for that next great idea or solution, crowdsourcing will help you get there even if the crowd itself doesn’t come up with it directly. The crowd will definitely spur your thinking, get you out of your rut, and perhaps plant the seed of a new idea or concept that will blossom into the breakthrough idea you are seeking.

Market validation: All companies have hunches – but often don’t have the proof of whether their hunches are right or not. At a bare minimum, crowdsourcing will confirm some of the hunches you have, and even better, help you refine your hunches into market proven data points. Or it will warn you that your hunch is wrong and prevent a potentially costly mistake.


Randy Corke
http://www.chaordix.com/blog/2010/11/24/looking-beyond-the-breakthrough-idea/

While adopting crowdsourcing for innovation certainly can lead to breakthrough ideas, solutions and crowd efforts, I believe there is too much focus on the breakthrough and not enough value assigned to the many other benefits of engaging your stakeholders using crowdsoucing methods. In fact, even if a breakthrough is unlikely, there are still ample reasons to begin crowdsourcing. Here are a few:

Seed concepts: If you are looking for that next great idea or solution, crowdsourcing will help you get there even if the crowd itself doesn’t come up with it directly. The crowd will definitely spur your thinking, get you out of your rut, and perhaps plant the seed of a new idea or concept that will blossom into the breakthrough idea you are seeking.

Market validation: All companies have hunches – but often don’t have the proof of whether their hunches are right or not. At a bare minimum, crowdsourcing will confirm some of the hunches you have, and even better, help you refine your hunches into market proven data points. Or it will warn you that your hunch is wrong and prevent a potentially costly mistake. Leer más “Looking Beyond the Breakthrough Idea”

Medical Monday: The Power of the Tool Box – 3 Key Tools for Pharma Social Media Success

Recently, the CDC released a new resource to help health communicators utilize social media for communicating health data – the Health Communicator’s Social Media Toolkit. This new tool is a great asset for the public health community to establish a framework for utilizing social media.

Similar to the public health/government agency community, the pharmaceutical industry’s highly regulated nature makes similar “tool boxes” a great way for companies to keep their efforts in line with how they can and should be using social media. Here are three key “tools” that every pharmaceutical marketer should integrate into their tool box…


Recently, the CDC released a new resource to help health communicators utilize social media for communicating health data – the Health Communicator’s Social Media Toolkit. This new tool is a great asset for the public health community to establish a framework for utilizing social media.

Similar to the public health/government agency community, the pharmaceutical industry’s highly regulated nature makes similar “tool boxes” a great way for companies to keep their efforts in line with how they can and should be using social media. Here are three key “tools” that every pharmaceutical marketer should integrate into their tool box… Leer más “Medical Monday: The Power of the Tool Box – 3 Key Tools for Pharma Social Media Success”

Links just links…


Posted by Tamara Gielen

http://www.b2bemailmarketing.com/2010/10/links-for-2010-10-07.html

The crowdsourcing dilemma: the idea with the most votes isn’t always the best idea

You might wonder, with great anti-biasing technology, why wouldn’t the idea with the most votes always be the best idea? There are all sorts of reasons: a great idea might have been entered relatively late in the crowdsourcing process or the submitter might have given it a non-compelling title, for example. But by looking at implicit data, as well as explicit data, (that is looking at how the crowd interacts with ideas and not just at the hard data like votes), you can identify other indicators for ideas that are truly merit worthy, despite not getting the most votes, or even a lot of votes. You may not be able to immediately tell if the “underdog” idea is in fact a better idea, but you can provide it with more visibility within the crowd so that you can do an apples-to-apples comparison with the big vote getting ideas.

Here are some of the things we do, and suggest others do, to ensure a reliable, accurate outcome, and avoid the “popularity contest” syndrome:

* Multiple idea order display – Display ideas in a variety of ways, such as most recent, most discussed and most active for example, and don’t just default to listing the top voted ideas.
* Zero-start finalist round – Use a finalist round to allow the entire crowd to focus on just a few ideas which all show signs of being superior ideas, and start all finalists at zero votes.
* Weighted voting – give insider experts, your panel, or more long-time active members more vote weight… you’ll find these people are highly motivated to filter the best not just the popular to the top


Randy Corke| http://www.chaordix.com/blog

One of the common complaints about crowdsourcing is that it can become a popularity contest: the idea that gets the most early votes rises to the top of the list, therefore gets more views, and therefore more votes and becomes the winner. And, unfortunately, for many so-called “crowdsourcing” sites, this is true. You see it on sites like Digg – get enough early “diggs” for your submission to get on the “top news” list and your submission can get visibility for a long time.

We work hard to surface the best quality results for our clients from their crowdsourcing projects, so as you would expect, we have developed ways to avoid this “early vote” bias and other forms of bias. But even with great design and planning, the best technology and the right methodology, you can’t completely eliminate the possibility of a less-worthy idea getting the most votes. However, it IS possible to use analysis and crowd management techniques to ensure that other highly worthy ideas can be identified, so that the chances of truly finding the best idea are maximized.

Leer más “The crowdsourcing dilemma: the idea with the most votes isn’t always the best idea”

Giving users some credit | Users are Not Idiots

Websites are designed to be used by people of varying backgrounds, educations and technical levels. One of the challenges we face when designing for the Web is finding a way to create sites and applications that can be accessed by a widely disparate audience while avoiding the pitfall of sacrificing the quality of our work to cater to the dreaded ‘lowest common denominator.’
Users are Not Idiots

Even though it happens to me with some frequency, being told by a client that one of the requirements for their project is that it must be ‘idiot proof’ never fails to give me pause. The sentiment itself is offensive enough, but the concept also seems somewhat misguided to me. Do we really want to begin a project by assuming our site’s users are idiots?


//designinformer.com
By Jeremy Girard

Websites are designed to be used by people of varying backgrounds, educations and technical levels. One of the challenges we face when designing for the Web is finding a way to create sites and applications that can be accessed by a widely disparate audience while avoiding the pitfall of sacrificing the quality of our work to cater to the dreaded ‘lowest common denominator.’

Users are Not Idiots

Even though it happens to me with some frequency, being told by a client that one of the requirements for their project is that it must be ‘idiot proof’ never fails to give me pause. The sentiment itself is offensive enough, but the concept also seems somewhat misguided to me. Do we really want to begin a project by assuming our site’s users are idiots?

Websites for Dummies

Creating designs that are intuitive and easy to use is something we should continually strive for if we want our sites and applications to be visited and used by as many people as possible. Ultimately, making those sites easy, as well as enjoyable, to use is a critical part of helping them be successful and it starts by abandoning outdated opinions on what users can, and cannot, understand. It starts by giving our users some credit and realizing that they are not ‘idiots.’

When Best Practices Go Bad

Anyone who has designed for the Web for a period of time has amassed a bank of best practices and favored solutions that they use in their work. In and of itself, this is a good thing, but the ever-changing nature of the Internet means that we have to continually evaluate these best practices to ensure they are still relevant. As Web users’ proficiency and technical comfort levels grow, we must abandon solutions that no longer help visitors use our sites, but instead may actually start to hinder their experience.

As a communication medium, the Web may still be the ‘new kid on the block,’ but let’s face it – the Internet isn’t new anymore. Web users are more advanced today then they were even a few years ago. This is great news for those of us who work on the Web! It means that we can continually push our work forward, but it also means that we not only have to be willing to embrace change, but that we need to be proactive in identifying when that change is necessary.

User Testing is Not Always the Answer

User Testing

There is no question that user testing is an invaluable part of the web design process, but any user testing we do for a project has limitations. Oftentimes, those limitations are due to budgetary and time constraints. This being the case, we focus our tests on key aspects of our projects where user input will help shape our decisions and positively impact the success of our design.

Since we often can’t evaluate and test every aspect of our project, some decisions will inevitably be driven by our best practices and favored solutions. If those practices are up to date and relevant, this isn’t a problem, but if they are outdated – well, I’m sure you can follow the line of reasoning here. Leer más “Giving users some credit | Users are Not Idiots”

Innovation does not start with idea generation

I’ve just finished reading a book called Intangible Capital (more on that in another post) by Mary Adams. The book does a good job describing the value and importance of knowledge, intellectual property and other intangible assets, and why innovation is key to the creation of those assets.

But that’s not the subject of today’s post. Today’s post deals with the fallacy that innovation “starts” with idea generation. I’m picking on Mary’s book because it was at hand and the latest to suggest that innovation starts with idea generation. I know this because it says so on page 85, but Mary’s writing does not stand alone. Far too often I hear people suggest or read that innovation starts with idea generation. Sorry, no – and my apologies in advance to Mary for calling out this small problem in what was otherwise a very good book.


Jeffrey Phillips

I’ve just finished reading a book called Intangible Capital (more on that in another post) by Mary Adams.  The book does a good job describing the value and importance of knowledge, intellectual property and other intangible assets, and why innovation is key to the creation of those assets.

But that’s not the subject of today’s post.  Today’s post deals with the fallacy that innovation “starts” with idea generation.  I’m picking on Mary’s book because it was at hand and the latest to suggest that innovation starts with idea generation.  I know this because it says so on page 85, but Mary’s writing does not stand alone.  Far too often I hear people suggest or read that innovation starts with idea generation.  Sorry, no – and my apologies in advance to Mary for calling out this small problem in what was otherwise a very good book.

Leer más “Innovation does not start with idea generation”