You’re ketchup Heinz! la compran Buffett y Lemann


Warren Buffett junto a uno de los hombres más ricos de Brasil han presentado una oferta para la compra de Heinz en US$ 28.000 millones. El acuerdo, que por tamaño es la cuarta operación de compras alimentarias de todos los tiempos, aumenta el optimismo sobre la reactivación de fusiones y adquisiciones.

La compra  que ya fue aprobada por el directorio de Heinz, ha reunido al Berkshire Hathaway de Warren Buffety a 3G Capital, una firma de capital privado respaldada por el multimillonario brasileño Jorge Paulo Lemann, que en 2010 encabezó la compra apalancada de Burger King.

Berkshire, un conglomerado con más de 70 negocios amasados durante más de 40 años por Buffett, estaba buscando grandes compras para colocar sus US$ 48.000 millones. Además,  ha dicho por televisión que está buscando  algún otro elefante para comprar. ?Si alguien ve alguno que me avise?.

En círculos inversores se dice que la participación de 3G en una operación de 3G es inusual y que refleja la dificultad de Buffet para encontrar compañías para comprar.

Leer más “You’re ketchup Heinz! la compran Buffett y Lemann”

INFOGRAPHIC: Humorous Look At Facebook’s IPO


http://allfacebook.com

With all of the serious news and analysis surrounding Friday’s Facebook initial public offering, Victoria, British Columbia-basedForbes blogger Greg Voakes chimed in with Facebook MBA, a humorous infographic based on Facebook’s timeline profile.

We particularly enjoyed the fictional status updates and comments from Facebook Co-Founder and Chief Executive OfficerMark Zuckerberg, legendary investor and Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett, and MySpace Co-Founder Tom Anderson, among others.

Why Analysts Don’t Want to Say ‘Buy’

The caution extends beyond the U.S. More than 54 percent of ratings for companies in the U.S., U.K., Japan, and Brazil are “holds,” the highest level since Bloomberg began tracking the data in 1997. While the proportion of “sell” ratings in the U.S. has fallen to 5.1 percent, half the level of 2003, the total combined with “holds” reached a record 71 percent last month, the data show.

While pessimism is increasing, analysts say profits for companies in the MSCI World Index of 24 developed nations will gain 28 percent in the next year. The MSCI index trades at 11.4 times forecast profit, data compiled by Bloomberg show. Except for the six months starting October 2008, the index has never traded below 12.5 times annual earnings.

Shields says his biggest concern is that joblessness will weaken consumer spending, which accounts for 70 percent of the U.S. economy. “Employment is much worse than what people have anticipated,” he says. “If I had to pick one single factor that underlies our negativity, that’s what it is.”


They’re turning more pessimistic even as they push up profit growth estimates. How joblessness will affect consumer spending is a big worry

By Rita Nazareth and Lynn Thomasson

Meyer Shields says earnings at Warren Buffett‘s Berkshire Hathaway (BRK.A) will increase the most since 2006 this year. He’s also telling investors to sell the shares because the economic recovery is weakening.

When it comes to sending mixed messages, the Stifel Nicolaus analyst has plenty of company. For the first time since at least 1997, fewer than 29 percent of ratings on stocks covered by brokerages worldwide are “buys,” according to 159,919 recommendations compiled and tracked by Bloomberg. Analysts are turning more pessimistic even as they push up profit-growth estimates among Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index companies to 36 percent, the highest since 1988.

“People are sitting on a fence,” says Paul Zemsky, the New York-based head of asset allocation for ING Investment Management, which oversees $550 billion.

“When I go and talk to our equity analysts, they look at the companies and say, ‘Boy, these companies look pretty good, earnings are O.K., they have plenty of cash. What if there’s a double dip?'” Leer más “Why Analysts Don’t Want to Say ‘Buy’”

6 Tips for Pitching to Major Clients

Almost every major web designer faces this dilemma at some point: either continue working with “mom-and-pop” style businesses, enjoying effortless marketing and relatively simple projects, or transition to working with larger businesses and reap the benefits of bigger budgets.

It’s a question of experience, and with enough design work under your belt, new opportunities start to present themselves.

The most difficult part for many is making the transition. The comfort of simple work and the ease of marketing yourself can make maintaining a small client network very tempting.

You see the effort involved in pitching to a major client and you slightly recoil, worried that you’re not quite skilled enough, you’re not quite experienced enough and your business is not quite big enough.


Almost every major web designer faces this dilemma at some point: either continue working with “mom-and-pop” style businesses, enjoying effortless marketing and relatively simple projects, or transition to working with larger businesses and reap the benefits of bigger budgets.

It’s a question of experience, and with enough design work under your belt, new opportunities start to present themselves.

The most difficult part for many is making the transition. The comfort of simple work and the ease of marketing yourself can make maintaining a small client network very tempting.

You see the effort involved in pitching to a major client and you slightly recoil, worried that you’re not quite skilled enough, you’re not quite experienced enough and your business is not quite big enough. Leer más “6 Tips for Pitching to Major Clients”

Google, Coca-Cola, Amazon Own Best Reputations


– Mark Dolliver, Adweek
In its annual rankings of the “Reputation Quotient” of the 60 most visible companies in the U.S., Harris Interactive found respondents picking Berkshire Hathaway as the one with the best reputation. Filling out the top 10 were Johnson & Johnson, Google, 3M, SC Johnson, Intel, Microsoft, Coca-Cola, Amazon.com and General Mills.

At the bottom of the Reputation Quotient standings were Freddie Mac, AIG, Fannie Mae, Citigroup, Goldman Sachs, Chrysler, General Motors, JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America and Delta Air Lines. Harris notes in its analysis of the findings that “the nine lowest companies all have received government/bailout money or currently remain government-supported.” Though it fell into the middle of the pack, at No. 37, Ford. — which conspicuously did not take a federal bailout — was notable for having achieved the biggest one-year increase in Reputation Quotient score of any company in the past nine years.

The ratings are based on respondents’ opinions of the degree to which companies embody (or don’t) 20 attributes, ranging from “value for money” to “environmental responsibility” to “record of profitability.” These 20 are grouped under six general headings: “emotional appeal,” “products and services,” “workplace environment,” “financial performance,” “vision and leadership” and “social responsibility.” Polling was fielded from late December through mid-February. Leer más “Google, Coca-Cola, Amazon Own Best Reputations”