She’s worth it: Cheryl Cole adds more bounce to hairspray sales

The limited edition Elnett hairspray can has Cheryl Cole’s face on it and has been a huge seller

Singer’s big, backcombed style credited with sparking first rise in demand for 10 years

Love her or loathe her, Cheryl Cole is creating a lasting impression – on sales of hairspray.

The fortunes of the hair grooming product, long blighted by its association with less than chi-chi salons and its environmental impact, has been reversed – and Cole’s “big hair” is being credited.

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by jeremywaite

The limited edition Elnett hairspray can has Cheryl Cole‘s face on it and has been a huge seller

Singer’s big, backcombed style credited with sparking first rise in demand for 10 years

Love her or loathe her, Cheryl Cole is creating a lasting impression – on sales of hairspray.

The fortunes of the hair grooming product, long blighted by its association with less than chi-chi salons and its environmental impact, has been reversed – and Cole’s “big hair” is being credited. Leer más “She’s worth it: Cheryl Cole adds more bounce to hairspray sales”

Animal kingdom is here to help in new skin-care print campaign

The skin-care category isn’t typically a hotbed of creativity. Ads are usually focused on three things: celeb endorsers, lots of copy and lots of promises. But ad agency Mother in New York has gone a different route with a new print campaign for StriVectin-SD, which is billed as a “super-charged way to aggressively fight deep wrinkles and stretch marks.” Those skin problems are depicted in a novel way.

For crow’s feet, for instance, the ad shows actual crow’s feet.

Other ads show a wrinkly pug, a hen and a lizard, all of which are illustrations of what your skin shouldn’t look like. “The mission came from the clients,” says Mother creative director Bobby Hershfield. “They wanted to do something bold and different.” Even if that means the metaphor, at times, is a bit of stretch.


By Todd Wasserman

StriVectin-SD

The skin-care category isn’t typically a hotbed of creativity. Ads are usually focused on three things: celeb endorsers, lots of copy and lots of promises. But ad agency Mother in New York has gone a different route with a new print campaign for StriVectin-SD, which is billed as a “super-charged way to aggressively fight deep wrinkles and stretch marks.” Those skin problems are depicted in a novel way.

For crow’s feet, for instance, the ad shows actual crow’s feet.

Other ads show a wrinkly pug, a hen and a lizard, all of which are illustrations of what your skin shouldn’t look like. “The mission came from the clients,” says Mother creative director Bobby Hershfield. “They wanted to do something bold and different.” Even if that means the metaphor, at times, is a bit of stretch.

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Colgate-Palmolive calls out Dove in soap scum fracas

No one wants to hear that their product is on the scummy side. Hence Colgate-Palmolive’s recent challenge to Unilever over a Dove Beauty Bar ad. In advertisements and online videos, the soap is shown to be different from other soaps because it doesn’t leave soap scum.

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u1edewxFhMI

Dove’s claim in the ad is backed by a putative scientist who explains that the soap doesn’t interact with calcium the way other soaps do. Colgate-Palmolive, which makes Irish Spring, disagreed with the assertion and went to the National Advertising Division of the Council of Better Business Bureaus, which decided that Dove’s claim was bunk and so is a “mirror demonstration” in the ad which NAD believes is rigged.


Pastajabon
Image via Wikipedia

By Todd Wasserman

No one wants to hear that their product is on the scummy side. Hence Colgate-Palmolive’s recent challenge to Unilever over a Dove Beauty Bar ad. In advertisements and online videos, the soap is shown to be different from other soaps because it doesn’t leave soap scum.

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u1edewxFhMI

Dove’s claim in the ad is backed by a putative scientist who explains that the soap doesn’t interact with calcium the way other soaps do. Colgate-Palmolive, which makes Irish Spring, disagreed with the assertion and went to the National Advertising Division of the Council of Better Business Bureaus, which decided that Dove’s claim was bunk and so is a “mirror demonstration” in the ad which NAD believes is rigged. Leer más “Colgate-Palmolive calls out Dove in soap scum fracas”

All Men are Liars

Sam de Brito has spent more than a decade writing for TV, film and newspapers. In his books, No Tattoos Before You’re Thirty and No Sex With Your Ex, he offers advice to his unborn children. In his offerings The Lost Boys and Building a Better Bloke, he takes the pulse of Aussie manhood. Now it’s your turn as he expounds on the business of being a bloke.


Hot

April 22, 2010One of the great developments in the way we perceive the opposite sex has been the evolution of the term “hot”.

Not as narrowly defined as “beautiful” or “handsome”, nor as lukewarm as “cute”, “hot” can be applied to men and women who don’t grace the covers of magazines or look like they live on egg white omelettes.

The hot can have tattoos and a pot belly, a muffin top or a broken nose but they all share a certain boiling point of sexiness that ignites the description in the beholder’s mind.

Haaawt. You know it when you see it and it’s different for all of us.

Big gums, frizzy hair, crooked teeth, scars, bald patches and hairy arms – these are all attributes that you’d shy away from terming conventionally beautiful but plenty of people find them hot on the right person …

While the modelling industry is criticised endlessly for the slender spectrum of body shapes it hails as attractive in women, as well as men, in the past 10 years or so we’ve seen an increasingly diverse range of faces being described as hot.

Some time ago I attended the David Jones season launch and one of the guys I was seated next to commented about the alien-like models on the catwalk, quipping that “ugly is the new beautiful”… Leer más “All Men are Liars”

New Ads Explain the Science Behind Clearasil


– Elaine Wong
Clearasil is dropping its humorous approach in ads, in favor of spots that espouse the “science” behind the skin care brand’s products.

A new campaign, called “The Science of Looking Awesome,” breaks today (Monday), and is part of a global effort by the Reckitt Benckiser-owned brand to pitch its products to a slightly older consumer group. Until now, Clearasil—best known for its acne-fighting properties—has been a favorite among teens. But according to Reckitt, 18- to 21-year-olds tend to use the products.

That’s why Reckitt decided to change the tone of its ads, said Sabrina Rodgers, Reckitt Benckier’s marketing director for personal care products. In a commercial that ran last year, titled “Lipstick,” a teenage boy asks a girl if he can “borrow her lipstick,” and kisses her on the lips. (Tagline: “May cause confidence.”) In contrast, the new spots, via HavasEuro RSCG in New York, show how Clearasil’s acne-fighting properties help clear up skin.

One spot, for instance, shows a young woman walking into a lab-like bathroom. “It’s 10 p.m. and Kate’s face is breaking out. So she uses new, Clearasil Overnight Lotion,” the voiceover says. The ad touts Clearasil’s latest product launch, which hit shelves in January. Print ads, likewise, build on various scientific claims. Both the print and TV ads use graphics, such as diagrams depicting chemical bonds. The campaign includes print buys in this month’s Glamour and Allure issues, as well as ads running in Fitness and Seventeen next month. Leer más “New Ads Explain the Science Behind Clearasil”