La realidad social de estos Juegos Olímpicos marcará un antes y un después


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Atres Advertising, de la mano de Volkswagen, es pionera en la venta de publicidad en Connected TV

Muchas cosas han cambiado desde los últimos Juegos Olímpicos. Entre éstas, por ejemplo, la realidad socialen la que vivimos, con unaproliferación de redes, teléfonos inteligentes y tabletas, las cuales ni siquiera existían en los Juegos Olímpicos del verano de 2008.

El uso de teléfonos inteligentes(…) Leer más “La realidad social de estos Juegos Olímpicos marcará un antes y un después”

Survey: People Largely Negative About Google’s Personalized Search Results

There were two other survey questions fielded by AYTM about Google+:

Do you use Google+?
Would you be more likely to use Google+ if you knew you would get more tailored search results?
To the first question (Do you use it?) 19.3 percent responded “yes,” and another 20.3 percent said they had accounts that were not really used. The other 60.4 percent said they did not have Google+ accounts or said that they didn’t know what it was.

In terms of whether more people would use Google+ if they knew it helped personalize their results, 7.5 percent said “yes” they would be more likely to use it. However 44.4 percent said “no” and 48.1 percent said “maybe.”

It’s important to point out that this is just one survey and it’s not clear how representative the survey population was of the entire US adult population. It’s also important to observe that people often react negatively to change. However these results, if they can be generalized, represent a pretty strong negative reaction to the new direction Google is headed.


by   |  http://searchengineland.com
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Last month, market research tool provider Ask Your Target Market surveyed 400 US adults about their attitudes toward personalized search on Google. The results were reported today in eMarketer’s email newsletter. We went back to the source to check out the survey and discovered that the majority of respondents expressed ambivalence or outright dissatisfaction about Google’s new more personalized search results.

The first question asked was about the primary search engine used by respondents.

Primary search engine:

Source: AYTM, n=400 (1/12)

Then the survey explored respondents’ attitudes toward search personalization and Google+ participation.

Do you like the idea of personalizing search results based on past searches and info from your social networking sites?

Source: AYTM, n=400 (1/12)

A minority said yes (15.5 percent) they liked search personalization. But a clear majority were ambivalent or hostile to the idea (84.5 percent). Within that majority 45 percent said they did not want search results personalized at all. Of the three types of responses the “nos” were the dominant category.

There were two other survey questions fielded by AYTM about Google+:

  • Do you use Google+?
  • Would you be more likely to use Google+ if you knew you would get more tailored search results?

To the first question (Do you use it?) 19.3 percent responded “yes,” and another 20.3 percent said they had accounts that were not really used. The other 60.4 percent said they did not have Google+ accounts or said that they didn’t know what it was.

In terms of whether more people would use Google+ if they knew it helped personalize their results, 7.5 percent said “yes” they would be more likely to use it. However 44.4 percent said “no” and 48.1 percent said “maybe.”

It’s important to point out that this is just one survey and it’s not clear how representative the survey population was of the entire US adult population. It’s also important to observe that people often react negatively to change. However these results, if they can be generalized, represent a pretty strong negative reaction to the new direction Google is headed.

Postscript From Danny Sullivan: I wanted to add that with a further follow-up, it probably would have been incredibly easy to turn the 45% who said “No, I think everyone should see the same results” into a much smaller number. Leer más “Survey: People Largely Negative About Google’s Personalized Search Results”

Women’s Influence on Purchase Decisions on the Rise

Women’s use of social networks such as Facebook continues to grow year over year—73% of US female internet users now use Facebook, compared with 65% in 2010. The number of Facebook friends for the average US woman also continues to grow, and so does the number of brands she follows. According to the Fleishman-Hillard/Hearst study, women follow 12% more brands than they did in 2010.

In terms of talking about brands and making product recommendations on social networks, millennials appear to be standouts. Nearly half of online millennial women said they prefer shopping on the internet vs. in a store. And 51% use social networks to share commentary related to products and shopping.


http://www.emarketer.com

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Millennial women most likely to broadcast shopping decisions, recommendations

Today’s US woman is expanding her “sphere of influence,” according to September 2011 research fromFleishman-HillardHearst and Ipsos Mendelsohn. Through social networks and web tools, she is both contributing and seeking out purchase recommendations from friends and followers.

According to the survey, 54% of US female internet users said they feel a responsibility to help friends and family make wise purchase decisions, and nearly half said they influence friends and family to buy—or not buy—a product or service on a regular basis. When a similar study was conducted in September 2008, only 31% of women said they felt they regularly influenced other people’s purchase decisions.

Social networks and social reviews have played an important role in this rise in purchase influence. In the last six months, 46% women said they had read reviews about a product on a website. Moreover, 33% had recommended a specific product or service to someone, and 30% had reviewed a product or service on a website.

Product/Service Review and Recommendation Activities of US Female Internet Users, Sep 2011 (% of respondents) Leer más “Women’s Influence on Purchase Decisions on the Rise”