Why transparency matters—building equity in your personal brand


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What if you didn’t know the real names of your doctor, lawyer or accountant?

Most social media acquaintances aren’t exactly on a parallel plane with professional or collegial relationships — but how about your friends?
In 2008 when I began on Twitter, it wasn’t unusual to see people using descriptive monikers instead of their real names. How many people remember @TrendTracker or @TrendyDC? Today we know them as @GlenGilmore and @AnnTran_. I think they recognized their Twitter identities were going to be significant and went public at a point where their major growth was ahead of them. It enabled them to start positioning themselves as brands, and I believe they helped others feel comfortable about following suit. 

It’s about trust
I think most of us appreciate it when their connections on social media are transparent about who they are.  If I’m being honest with someone, I hope they’ll afford me the same courtesy. What is the point of engaging with or filling one’s timeline with less-than-honest people?

A cloak of secrecy signals more than “mystery.” It says, “There is a reason I don’t want you to know who I am.” Deceit is a shaky foundation for real connections.
How people perceive your brand
In establishing yourself as a brand, simplicity in your name and image and consistency in the way you interact are essential. Your behavior both on and off the public timeline matters. By using your real name, you are inviting people to trust you, and by maintaining a consistent and positive presence across channels, you build relationships with people as well as equity in the recognition of who you are.
Business accounts may not identify the specific person tweeting on its behalf, though many do. Identifying who is tweeting is a good thing because most people would rather tweet with a person than an “entity.” When one is responsible for engaging in conversations on behalf of a business, they need to keep in mind the reputation and personality of the company they represent. And if their identity is known, they have the opportunity to project positively for a business, but also build recognition in themselves.
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El director James Cameron inicia su descenso al Pacífico

l director de cine canadiense James Cameron, responsable de títulos como ‘Avatar’, ‘Titanic’ y ‘Abyss’, ha iniciado su descenso a la Fosa de las Marianas, en las profundidades del Océano Pacífico, ha anunciado National Geographic.

Cameron “ha comenzado su descenso hacia la zona más profunda del océano”, ha revelado a través de ‘tuit’ National Geographic, que dirige laexpedición Deepsea Challenge hasta el confín de la corteza terrestre, que se encuentra 11,2 kilometros por debajo del nivel del mar.


OCEANOGRAFÍA | Expedición Deepsea ChallengeJames Cameron, durante la prueba del sumergible 'Deepsea Challenger' en Australia. | Efe

James Cameron, durante la prueba del sumergible ‘Deepsea Challenger’ en Australia. | Efe

El director de cine canadiense James Cameron, responsable de títulos como ‘Avatar’, ‘Titanic’ y ‘Abyss’, ha iniciado su descenso a la Fosa de las Marianas, en las profundidades del Océano Pacífico, ha anunciado National Geographic. Leer más “El director James Cameron inicia su descenso al Pacífico”

Avatar producer explains how to market to kids despite PG-13 rating


A PG-13 movie is the sweet spot for maximizing the revenue of a film. Movies that are rated “R” will by definition have a narrower audience, while any child with a parent can see a movie rated PG-13. “We were very conscious as we went through Avatar not to make an R-rated movie,” Landau explained. “There is a version that could have been R-rated, and if Jim [Cameron] had the opportunity to go back, he would change True Lies. True Lies is an R-rated movie, although you don’t think of it that way. We were very conscious about making [Avatar] accessible.”

3D needs to be planned for, not added later

Landau also had strong words about films that tried to quickly add 3D effects near the end of the process. In his world, 3D is inevitable, and he said that just as wearing sunglasses is a part of going to the beach, the same could be said for going to the movies. We asked about films with poorly done 3D turning the audience off the technology.

“I think that ultimately people shouldn’t have to think about 3D or not-3D, I think it should all be in 3D,” he said. “I think right now you’re doing a disservice to the consumer and the filmmaker by trying to convert movies hastily into 3D.” He brings up Clash of the Titans, where the conversion process was attempted in seven weeks, without any input from the film’s director.

“Converting a movie from 2D to 3D is not a technical process. It is a creative process,” Landau explained. “You have to involve the creators into the process. If you want a movie to be in color, would you ever shoot it in black-and-white and convert it?”

He sums up his feelings on 3D simply. “For us, 3D is a window into a world, not a world coming out of a window. We want the screen plane to disappear when you’re watching our movie, not for you to be ducking during every scene.”

Vía:
Avatar producer explains how to market to kids despite PG-13 rating.

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What We Can Learn About Recruiting From Avatar’s Creator

A long time after the rest of the world, I finally saw the movie Avatar, and I was thrilled. Not from the 3D or the big story, but from the fine details. These, in my mind, made the difference, leading millions around the world to believe there is such a planet like Pandora (or that we’ll find one in 150 years time — in 2154, as James Cameron wrote).

I believe these details can help recruiters reach a huge success, especially if they use the social media.

But I’ll start at the beginning.
How Do We Convince People That Something Illogical Really Exists?


A long time after the rest of the world, I finally saw the movie Avatar, and I was thrilled. Not from the 3D or the big story, but from the fine details. These, in my mind, made the difference, leading millions around the world to believe there is such a planet like Pandora (or that we’ll find one in 150 years time — in 2154, as James Cameron wrote).

I believe these details can help recruiters reach a huge success, especially if they use the social media.

But I’ll start at the beginning.

How Do We Convince People That Something Illogical Really Exists? Leer más “What We Can Learn About Recruiting From Avatar’s Creator”