Web Designers vs. Web Developers

There are many WYSIWYG tools, templates, and canned solutions that let a designer build a simple site alone. Just as there are many graphics applications, free graphics, and templates that would let a developer build a site alone. That is of course if you only need a very simple site. The simple informative type site is the internet equivalent of a highway billboard or a flier, it’s just a placeholder for information. If that’s all you need then a designer alone can build your site. As soon as you pass beyond that level then you cannot have your designer and developer in one. Here are some major reasons you do not want a developer and designer in one.


I recently saw a discussion online asking the question, “Do Web designers need Web developers anymore?” This is a very important question but not because of what it asks but because of what it suggests. This question suggests there is a movement toward designers not needing developers. This is absolutely not true. There are many examples and reasons why that is not true but it’s still a surprisingly common question. There is one case (arguably) where designers don’t need developers (or vice versa). For small, information-only sites you can get away with just a designer (or just a developer).

There are many WYSIWYG tools, templates, and canned solutions that let a designer build a simple site alone. Just as there are many graphics applications, free graphics, and templates that would let a developer build a site alone. That is of course if you only need a very simple site. The simple informative type site is the internet equivalent of a highway billboard or a flier, it’s just a placeholder for information. If that’s all you need then a designer alone can build your site. As soon as you pass beyond that level then you cannot have your designer and developer in one. Here are some major reasons you do not want a developer and designer in one. Leer más “Web Designers vs. Web Developers”

2000 Free Photoshop Patterns


By Brant Wilson

Flowers Patters for Photoshop (6)

Photoshop Patterns

Photoshop Patterns (12)

Leer más “2000 Free Photoshop Patterns”

Designing Microsites: Factors To Consider

When creating a website, so many things need to be planned and considered before even beginning the design — content, audience, goals, usability, color schemes, and so much more.

The design of a microsite, on the other hand, would seem to be an easier task to execute. But this isn’t always the case.

A microsite will sometimes have more sensitive issues to deal with, and could see just as many design iterations — possibly due to branding issues, or a host of other factors that arise due to company politics.

Because of the vast array of possibilities for designs of microsites, there really is no way to properly define any “best practices” in this area of web design.

Certainly many of the same habits and practices would apply (valid code, progressive enhancement, usability, etc.). So, while I’ll be refraining from making any definite statements here, I think it would be valuable to consider the different ways to approach the design of a microsite, discussing some of the potential benefits and drawbacks to each one.
What is a Microsite?

Just to lay some basic groundwork here, the term microsite is defined on Wikipedia, in part, as follows:

“A microsite, also known as a minisite or weblet, is an Internet web design term referring to an individual web page or cluster of pages which are meant to function as an auxiliary supplement to a primary website… Microsites may be used for purely commercial purposes to create in-depth information about a particular product, service or as editorial support towards a specific product, such as describing a new technology.”

Having defined the term, I’ll discuss four possible solutions for designing a microsite, and the benefits and drawbacks of each.

The example designs I’ve created for this article are not to be taken literally from a layout and design perspective; the layouts could be vastly different in each case. The purpose of the visual examples are to demonstrate the contrasting ways that different parts of a microsite are featured, or how prominent the different parts are in relation to one another.

I should also note here that, although this article is not discussing web apps that function in the same manner as microsites, some of the same principles and guidelines would certainly apply.


thumbWhen creating a website, so many things need to be planned and considered before even beginning the design — content, audience, goals, usability, color schemes, and so much more.

The design of a microsite, on the other hand, would seem to be an easier task to execute. But this isn’t always the case.

A microsite will sometimes have more sensitive issues to deal with, and could see just as many design iterations — possibly due to branding issues, or a host of other factors that arise due to company politics.

Because of the vast array of possibilities for designs of microsites, there really is no way to properly define any “best practices” in this area of web design.

Certainly many of the same habits and practices would apply (valid code, progressive enhancement, usability, etc.). So, while I’ll be refraining from making any definite statements here, I think it would be valuable to consider the different ways to approach the design of a microsite, discussing some of the potential benefits and drawbacks to each one.

//

What is a Microsite?

Just to lay some basic groundwork here, the term microsite is defined on Wikipedia, in part, as follows:

“A microsite, also known as a minisite or weblet, is an Internet web design term referring to an individual web page or cluster of pages which are meant to function as an auxiliary supplement to a primary website… Microsites may be used for purely commercial purposes to create in-depth information about a particular product, service or as editorial support towards a specific product, such as describing a new technology.”

Having defined the term, I’ll discuss four possible solutions for designing a microsite, and the benefits and drawbacks of each.

The example designs I’ve created for this article are not to be taken literally from a layout and design perspective; the layouts could be vastly different in each case. The purpose of the visual examples are to demonstrate the contrasting ways that different parts of a microsite are featured, or how prominent the different parts are in relation to one another.

I should also note here that, although this article is not discussing web apps that function in the same manner as microsites, some of the same principles and guidelines would certainly apply. Leer más “Designing Microsites: Factors To Consider”

A Beginner’s Guide to Website Feedback

Andrew Follett

The term “feedback” is coming close to finding itself in clichéd business word category (along with personal favorites “synergy” and “paradigm”). Even if for you the word itself isn’t necessarily something that you expect to see in a Dilbert cartoon, the thought of what feedback entails can be unpleasant. For many it conjures up visions of clueless coworkers asking you to add animated .gifs and flashing purple buttons to a page, or of a client submitting a list of 82 new items to create on their site even though you are on the ninth round of changes. If nothing else, getting feedback stinks because it’s more (usually boring) work for you, and let’s face it, you’d rather be doing something else.

But you need some feedback. So, here’s the question: how can you keep from having to waste hours upon hours getting feedback from largely unhelpful sources, while still making sure that what you are creating actually makes sense, looks good, and doesn’t end your career?

Here are a few strategies for getting feedback as well as some tools that have been proven to help web designers simplify the feedback process:
Community Driven Feedback

Imagine walking into a big room of graphic and web design professionals (much like yourself). These folks are smart and on top of their respective games (again, much like yourself). Now imagine standing up in front of all of them, showing them your latest work, and then asking for feedback. While there is the potential to get some great input on what you’ve created, the whole process would likely be highly disorganized and nerve-wracking. Fortunately there are some tools that get pretty close to the benefits of standing up in front of a roomful of like-minded professionals, without any of the disorganization or (as much) potential humiliation.


Andrew Follett

The term “feedback” is coming close to finding itself in clichéd business word category (along with personal favorites “synergy” and “paradigm”). Even if for you the word itself isn’t necessarily something that you expect to see in a Dilbert cartoon, the thought of what feedback entails can be unpleasant. For many it conjures up visions of clueless coworkers asking you to add animated .gifs and flashing purple buttons to a page, or of a client submitting a list of 82 new items to create on their site even though you are on the ninth round of changes. If nothing else, getting feedback stinks because it’s more (usually boring) work for you, and let’s face it, you’d rather be doing something else.

But you need some feedback. So, here’s the question: how can you keep from having to waste hours upon hours getting feedback from largely unhelpful sources, while still making sure that what you are creating actually makes sense, looks good, and doesn’t end your career?

Here are a few strategies for getting feedback as well as some tools that have been proven to help web designers simplify the feedback process:

Community Driven Feedback

Imagine walking into a big room of graphic and web design professionals (much like yourself). These folks are smart and on top of their respective games (again, much like yourself). Now imagine standing up in front of all of them, showing them your latest work, and then asking for feedback. While there is the potential to get some great input on what you’ve created, the whole process would likely be highly disorganized and nerve-wracking. Fortunately there are some tools that get pretty close to the benefits of standing up in front of a roomful of like-minded professionals, without any of the disorganization or (as much) potential humiliation. Leer más “A Beginner’s Guide to Website Feedback”

20 Design Blogs Worth Reading


With so many web design blogs available on the Internet it can be hard to know which ones are worth checking out, so we have compiled a list of 20 web design/development blogs we think you should try and read. Some of the websites in this list you will have heard of but some are small blogs with fantastic content that we hope you will check out.

Design Instruct

design blogs

Design Instruct is a regularly updated web magazine for designers and digital artists where you can find and learn design tips and tricks.

TwitterRSS Feed

UX Booth

design blogs

The UX Booth is a blog by and for the user experience community. Our readership consists mostly of beginning-to-intermediate user experience and interaction designers, but anyone interested in making the web a better place to be is welcome.

TwitterRSS Feed Leer más “20 Design Blogs Worth Reading”

Descarga gratis el manual Dreamweaver CS5 en español

El programa Dreamweaver me parece muy complicado, pero cuando comienzas a entender la forma de trabajar ofrece muchas posibilidades para crear una buena página de Internet.

Para todos los que quieren comenzar a diseñar sitios de Internet con el nuevo Dreamweaver CS5, hoy les mostramos donde descargar gratis el manual en español de esta nueva versión del popular Dreamweaver, que viene con muchas opciones mejoradas.

La nueva versión de Dreamweaver CS5 cuenta con diversas opciones mejoradas y otras las han incluido por primera vez. Si ya sabes utilizar el programa Dreamweaver te será un poco más fácil comprender el nuevo funcionamiento de este programa, ya que la visualización es nueva pero muchas de sus opciones son las mismas.

Para los que no están familiarizados con la interface y funcionamiento del programa Dreamweaver CS5, aquí les proporcionamos el manual en español de Dreamweaver CS5, un documento muy practico que te mostrará todo lo que tienes que saber de este programa.

El manual en español de Dreamweaver CS5 lo puedes descargar en Ziddu, y viene de referencia del sitio creativosonline. Ya no tendrás que preocuparte por no saber como usar Dreamweaver CS5 y mucho menos de no entender inglés, ya que este manual en español te será de mucha utilidad.


Autor: Gaby MC

Dreamweaver es un programa que te ayuda a diseñar una página web así como optimizarla.

Manual en español de Dreamweaver CS5

El programa Dreamweaver me parece muy complicado, pero cuando comienzas a entender la forma de trabajar ofrece muchas posibilidades para crear una buena página de Internet.

Para todos los que quieren comenzar a diseñar sitios de Internet con el nuevo Dreamweaver CS5, hoy les mostramos donde descargar gratis el manual en español de esta nueva versión del popular Dreamweaver, que viene con muchas opciones mejoradas.

La nueva versión de Dreamweaver CS5 cuenta con diversas opciones mejoradas y otras las han incluido por primera vez. Si ya sabes utilizar el programa Dreamweaver te será un poco más fácil comprender el nuevo funcionamiento de este programa, ya que la visualización es nueva pero muchas de sus opciones son las mismas.

Para los que no están familiarizados con la interface y funcionamiento del programa Dreamweaver CS5, aquí les proporcionamos el manual en español de Dreamweaver CS5, un documento muy practico que te mostrará todo lo que tienes que saber de este programa. Leer más “Descarga gratis el manual Dreamweaver CS5 en español”

5 Fun Links for Web Nerds | Carsonified


By Chrissie Brodigan

Hey there! Happy Friday!

For our Friday link roundup, we celebrate the best in “interestingness!” (lego constructs, stop-motion animation via YouTube, Flickr finds, Tumblrs, and much more)!

Wildcard news link: It’s your last chance to get a look at mars until 2012 (via. yahoo)

Drumroll!

Winners from this week’s Carbonmade contest:

Spencer Fry and the Carbonmade team was really excited to get more than 50 submissions, and they made the hard choice to feature Josh Haygood @ joshhaygood.carbonmade.com. “He’s got the best complete portfolio. The dude is on his way to amazing!”

The feature is live on the Examples Page! (Thank you Carbonmade!)

Other winners who all have been upgraded to “Whoo!” accounts:

Let us give you link love! Send your links to news@thinkvitamin.com

Handpicked by,
Chrissie (@tenaciouscb)

http://carsonified.com/blog/uncategorized/5-fun-links-for-web-nerds/

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