Pan-Session Analysis With Google Analytics


 

Marketing Measurement & Optimization

Multi-Session Analysis With Google Analytics

When it comes to analytics, I am a big fan of pan-session analysis. Pan-session analysis provides insights across multiple visits by the same person. For almost every website it is an incredibly, powerful way to understand your visitors better.

Online-behavior.com

By applying the insights you derive from this analysis, you can further optimize your visitor’s experience and conversion rate.

In the following paragraphs I will describe five different pan-session analysis techniques that deliver great insights.

  • Frequency and recency analysis
  • Time and visits to purchase analysis
  • Pan-session funnel analysis
  • Multichannel analysis
  • Customer analysis

Let’s start with frequency and recency reporting.

1. Frequency And Recency Analysis

Frequency and recency metrics and distributions show you how loyal your audience actually is. Do your visitors only come once and never return? Or do you have a great deal of visitors who come to your website even more than three times a week?

Let’s take a closer look at two reports. First, the ‘count of visits’ report, which shows the frequency of visitors (direct link to report):

Count of Visits report

Almost 80% of the visitors to this website visit the website just once and don’t come again. That doesn’t look very good. Let’s dive into the recency metric, in the ‘days since last visit’ report (go to this reportand click on ‘days since last visit’ tab).

Days Since Last Visit report

The recency graph on itself doesn’t look bad. Almost 90% of the visitors visited the website within the last day. But, we have to subtract the new visitors to get a good overview of the returning visitors percentage and how often they visit the site.

With the combined overview of recency and frequency metrics I would conclude that this website really needs to invest in building a stable base of loyal subscribers / visitors.

Posting new content (a blog?) and offers on a more regular base would definitely help to keep the visitors engaged with this website.

2. Visits And Time to Purchase Analysis

In order to find out more about the product buying decision cycle, the visits and time to purchase reports deliver very useful information. You can find these reports in the E-commerce module of Google Analytics (if you have E-commerce implemented, here is a direct link to report). An example of a “Visits to Purchase” report is shown below:

Visits to Purchase report

In this case roughly 40% of the visitors convert within the first visit and 70% needs one to four visits to come to a buying decision. Wow, 20% of the conversions on this website take place after seven or more visits. What’s happening here?

A lot of websites contain landing pages that are too much focused on making a direct sale. It is extremely important to segment your visitors and apply different tactics to make them convert. The “time to purchase” data shows a similar distribution as we saw earlier:

Time to Purchase report

Now it’s time to segment your data further and find out which visitors convert the highest (visitors from a geographical region, certain campaign traffic, etc.) and which visitors don’t. You can use different strategies for each visitor segment. Leer más “Pan-Session Analysis With Google Analytics”

¿Cómo pueden las marcas aprovechar el potencial visual de los medios sociales? | vuelodigital.com


Vuelo Digital | Mercadotecnia Digital, Social Media Marketing, Redes Sociales

vuelodigital.com

Los medios sociales son cada vez más visuales y, según las tendencias que se han dado a conocer para este año, esta característica seguirá creciendo en los siguientes años.

De esta manera, las marcas deberán de preocuparse por aprovechar el potencial que la “revolución visual” implica para hacerse cada vez más presentes entre los usuarios y entrar a la “nueva dinámica” de comunicación que ellos mismos están imponiendo.

De acuerdo con datos de Socially Sorted, los internautas son más propensos a conectar con las marcas que publican más imágenes que otros contenidos, al mismo tiempo que este tipo de materiales generan 53% más likes en Facebookque el resto de las actualizaciones y el engagement de los usuarios deInstagram es 10 veces mayor que el de otras plataformas.

Por tal motivo, tomando como referencia una infografía diseñada por la empresa antes mencionada, te presentamos seis consejos útiles para aprovechar al máximo el potencial visual de los medios sociales:

1.-No digas nada, sólo muéstralo!!!!!   Leer más “¿Cómo pueden las marcas aprovechar el potencial visual de los medios sociales? | vuelodigital.com”

Are You Dating Your Client?

The other day I realized that the relationships that I have been developing with my clients are similar to what I remember of the dating world. Of course, it’s been over 20 years since I was allowed to date anyone other than my wife, but from what I can recall, the similarities are there. Curse her and her “no dating” rule!

What kind of relationship are you in with your clients?

Flirting – You’re interested in each other, but haven’t made a commitment to do anything yet. Perhaps they are currently committed to another, but that relationship is struggling and you have an opportunity to provide this client with something fresh. You are regularly searching for a reason to call them, to get their attention, in hopes of creating that first date project.

Dating – You’ve been working with a new client and you are still trying to impress them at every opportunity. You aren’t exclusive yet, but you both like the work that has been produced and don’t see any reason to stray. You are looking forward to their calls, and they readily answer yours.

Married – You know what your client likes and dislikes, and you know how to ask in order to meet your creative or budgetary needs. You are mutually exclusive – you don’t do any work for their competitors, and they only use you for projects within your skill set. You might have had a few fights, but the relationship is strong, and you are fiercely protective of their business. You are seeing your creative projects grow over time, and the affect they are having on the business is positive.


The other day I realized that the relationships that I have been developing with my clients are similar to what I remember of the dating world.  Of course, it’s been over 20 years since I was allowed to date anyone other than my wife, but from what I can recall, the similarities are there.  Curse her and her “no dating” rule!

What kind of relationship are you in with your clients?

Flirting – You’re interested in each other, but haven’t made a commitment to do anything yet.  Perhaps they are currently committed to another, but that relationship is struggling and you have an opportunity to provide this client with something fresh.  You are regularly searching for a reason to call them, to get their attention, in hopes of creating that first date project.

Dating – You’ve been working with a new client and you are still trying to impress them at every opportunity.  You aren’t exclusive yet, but you both like the work that has been produced and don’t see any reason to stray.  You are looking forward to their calls, and they readily answer yours.

Married – You know what your client likes and dislikes, and you know how to ask in order to meet your creative or budgetary needs.  You are mutually exclusive – you don’t do any work for their competitors, and they only use you for projects within your skill set.  You might have had a few fights, but the relationship is strong, and you are fiercely protective of their business.  You are seeing your creative projects grow over time, and the affect they are having on the business is positive. Leer más “Are You Dating Your Client?”

Leadership and Change

First the bad news: If you’re not willing to embrace change you’re not ready to lead. Put simply, leadership is not a static endeavor. In fact, leadership demands fluidity, which requires the willingness to recognize the need for change, and finally the ability to lead change.

Now the good news: As much as some people want to create complexity around the topic of leading change for personal gain, the reality is that creating, managing and leading change is really quite simple. To prove my point, I’ll not only explain the entire change life-cycle in three short paragraphs, but I’ll do it in simple terms that anyone can understand. As a bonus I’ll also give you 10 items to assess in evaluating whether the change you’re considering is value added, or just change for the sake of change. [Más…]

An Overview on the Importance of Change:

While there is little debate that the successful implementation of change can create an extreme competitive advantage, it is not well understood that the lack of doing so can send a company (or an individual’s career) into a death spiral. Companies that seek out and embrace change are healthy, growing, and dynamic organizations, while companies that fear change are stagnant entities on their way to a slow and painful death.

Agility, innovation, disruption, fluidity, decisiveness, commitment, and above all else a bias toward action will lead to the creation of change. It is the implementation of change which results in evolving, growing and thriving companies. Much has been written about the importance of change, but there is very little information in circulation about how to actually create it.

While most executives and entrepreneurs have come to accept the concept of change management as a legitimate business practice, and change leadership as a legitimate executive priority in theory, I have found very few organizations that have effectively integrated change as a core discipline and focus area in reality. As promised, and without further ado, the change life-cycle in three easy steps:

A. Identifying the Need for Change: The need for change exists in every organization. Other than irrational change solely for the sake of change, every corporation must change to survive. If your entity doesn’t innovate and change in accordance with market driven needs and demands it will fail…it’s just that simple. The most complex area surrounding change is focusing your efforts in the right areas, for the right reasons, and at the right times. The ambiguity and risk can be taken out of the change agenda by simply focusing on three areas:

1. Your current customers – What needs to change to better serve your customers?
2. Potential customers – What needs to change to profitably create new customers?
3. Your talent and resources – What changes need to occur to better leverage existing talent and resources?

B. Leading Change: You cannot effectively lead change without understanding the landscape of change. There are four typical responses to change:

1. The Victim – Those that view change as a personal attack on their persona, their role, their job, or their area of responsibility. They view everything at an atomic level based upon how they perceive change will directly and indirectly impact them.
2. The Neutral Bystander – This group is neither for nor against change. They will not directly or vocally oppose change, nor will they proactively get behind change. The Neutral Bystander will just go with the flow not wanting to make any waves, and thus hoping to perpetually fly under the radar.
3. The Critic – The Critic opposes any and all change. Keep in mind that not all critics are overt in their resistance. Many critics remain in stealth mode trying to derail change behind the scenes by using their influence on others. Whether overt or covert, you must identify critics of change early in the process if you hope to succeed.
4. The Advocate – The Advocate not only embraces change, they will evangelize the change initiative. Like The Critics, it is important to identify The Advocates early in the process to not only build the power base for change, but to give momentum and enthusiasm to the change initiative.

Once you’ve identified these change constituencies you must involve all of them, message properly to each of them, and don’t let up. With the proper messaging and involvement even adversaries can be converted into allies.


by Mike Myatt
//business-strategy-innovation.com

Leadership and ChangeFirst the bad news: If you’re not willing to embrace change you’re not ready to lead. Put simply, leadership is not a static endeavor. In fact, leadership demands fluidity, which requires the willingness to recognize the need for change, and finally the ability to lead change.

Now the good news: As much as some people want to create complexity around the topic of leading change for personal gain, the reality is that creating, managing and leading change is really quite simple. To prove my point, I’ll not only explain the entire change life-cycle in three short paragraphs, but I’ll do it in simple terms that anyone can understand. As a bonus I’ll also give you 10 items to assess in evaluating whether the change you’re considering is value added, or just change for the sake of change. Leer más “Leadership and Change”

Blaming it on Apple, 57% of consumers will never buy an iPhone 4

A new study shows that consumers have an overwhelmingly negative reaction to the iPhone 4’s “Antennagate” debacle, likely moreover because of Apple’s bewildering apathetic response to the problem than the actual problem itself.

UK-based research group Opinium questioned consumers about how they felt about the iPhone 4 in light of the weeks-long media disaster over the fact that calls could be dropped so easily on the device. A whopping 57% said that they now have “no intention” of buying an iPhone 4.

25% of the survey respondents said they were “less likely” to buy one. Of course, this doesn’t take into account how many of the 100% of survey takers ever had an interest in the phone in the first place.
That’s where a more interesting statistic comes in: of those who owned an iPhone 3GS, 45% said that the whole ordeal has led them to shy away from the iPhone brand and go somewhere else for their next handset. That’s nearly half of the existing user base of the previous iPhone model.


Raven Lovecraft

A new study shows that consumers have an overwhelmingly negative reaction to the iPhone 4’s “Antennagate” debacle, likely moreover because of Apple’s bewildering apathetic response to the problem than the actual problem itself.

UK-based research group Opinium questioned consumers about how they felt about the iPhone 4 in light of the weeks-long media disaster over the fact that calls could be dropped so easily on the device. A whopping 57% said that they now have “no intention” of buying an iPhone 4.

25% of the survey respondents said they were “less likely” to buy one. Of course, this doesn’t take into account how many of the 100% of survey takers ever had an interest in the phone in the first place.
That’s where a more interesting statistic comes in: of those who owned an iPhone 3GS, 45% said that the whole ordeal has led them to shy away from the iPhone brand and go somewhere else for their next handset. That’s nearly half of the existing user base of the previous iPhone model. Leer más “Blaming it on Apple, 57% of consumers will never buy an iPhone 4”

Cupidtino, un sitio de citas para fans de Apple

No, no es ni 1 de abril ni 28 de febrero. ¡Gora San Fermín! La web de citas para fanes y fanas de Apple existe de verdad. Se llama Cupidtino (un mix entre Cupido y Cupertino, donde se encuentra la sede de la compañía de la manzana) y ha superado los 20. 000 miembros.

Cupidtino basa su concepción en la idea de que los usuarios de productos Apple son personas de gustos delicados, curiosas, creativas y con inclinación al diseño. Se trata de un servicio cuyo registro es gratuito pero que cobra una cuota mensual de 4.79 dólares para poder intercambiar mensajes con otros usuarios.


por David Garcia

ohuyhkqdNo, no es ni 1 de abril ni 28 de febrero. ¡Gora San Fermín! La web de citas para fanes y fanas de Apple existe de verdad. Se llama Cupidtino (un mix entre Cupido y Cupertino, donde se encuentra la sede de la compañía de la manzana) y ha superado los 20. 000 miembros.

Cupidtino basa su concepción en la idea de que los usuarios de productos Apple son personas de gustos delicados, curiosas, creativas y con inclinación al diseño. Se trata de un servicio cuyo registro es gratuito pero que cobra una cuota mensual de 4.79 dólares para poder intercambiar mensajes con otros usuarios. Leer más “Cupidtino, un sitio de citas para fans de Apple”

The Frustration of Open Innovation | 15inno


Last week, I held a workshop in which a couple of the participants – all from the same company – had some struggles finding out why they should embrace open innovation.

This scepticism was not driven by satisfaction with their current innovation processes and culture . On the contrary, this seemed to be seriously flawed creating lots of frustration within their organization.

So you should think they would be open to changes in their approach. They were not and I think their main reason for being sceptical came as they understood that open innovation requires a lot of hard work while also bringing the uncertainty that usually follows changes.

Even more importantly, they could see this will not happen if they do not have full support from their executives to go open. They do not have this. The executives did talk about going open, but they had not yet managed to truly embrace this new paradigm shift.

No wonder innovation-driven employees in a company with a flawed process and culture and no clear leadership on how to deal with this become frustrated.

So they rightfully asked the question why should they embrace open innovation. I used the traditional arguments that if done right open innovation provides access to larger pool of resources, faster speed to market and higher innovation productivity. It took a while but the participants eventually bought fully into the idea that you need to go open in order to win the innovation game.

It helped that the other companies at the workshop did not have this scepticism. On they contrary, they fully believed in the concept although they – as any other company – had their struggles gettign this right.

This made me think that open innovation – with all the change and uncertainty it brings – can be extremely frustrating to innovation leaders and other employees. Especially if they are led by executives who are not fully capable of leading in tough times.

How can companies as well as individual deal with this frustration? I will think further about this and it would be great hearing your input…

http://www.15inno.com/2010/04/04/oifrustration/

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