You’re ketchup Heinz! la compran Buffett y Lemann


Warren Buffett junto a uno de los hombres más ricos de Brasil han presentado una oferta para la compra de Heinz en US$ 28.000 millones. El acuerdo, que por tamaño es la cuarta operación de compras alimentarias de todos los tiempos, aumenta el optimismo sobre la reactivación de fusiones y adquisiciones.

La compra  que ya fue aprobada por el directorio de Heinz, ha reunido al Berkshire Hathaway de Warren Buffety a 3G Capital, una firma de capital privado respaldada por el multimillonario brasileño Jorge Paulo Lemann, que en 2010 encabezó la compra apalancada de Burger King.

Berkshire, un conglomerado con más de 70 negocios amasados durante más de 40 años por Buffett, estaba buscando grandes compras para colocar sus US$ 48.000 millones. Además,  ha dicho por televisión que está buscando  algún otro elefante para comprar. ?Si alguien ve alguno que me avise?.

En círculos inversores se dice que la participación de 3G en una operación de 3G es inusual y que refleja la dificultad de Buffet para encontrar compañías para comprar.

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The Challenges Facing Burger King Buyer 3G Capital

Burger King has had a turbulent history. Under Diageo, a former chain executive says, it was largely left alone and milked for cash, with the unit treated as an outpost for leaders in training. Once it moved into private equity’s hands, the focus switched to differentiating the brand from McDonald’s, with a focus on young men, for whom high-calorie burgers and ads with dancing chickens or a creepy-looking king seemed cool. The investors also focused quickly on returns: They initially kicked in $325 million of their own money, collecting more than that in special dividends. With added fees, funds from the initial public offering, and proceeds from the current sale, Burger King has been an investment winner even as its sales lagged behind rivals.


A Burger King restaurant in Leicester Square, ...

The investment outfit and its Brazilian backers will need to do more than just cut costs at the troubled burger chain

By Diane Brady
When it comes to the pitfalls of operating a fast-food chain, Burger King (BKC) has experienced them all: falling profits and sales, angry franchise owners, mediocre innovation, growing competition, and a razorlike focus on the very customers who have been hardest hit during the recession. So when a little-known investment outfit called 3G Capital said it would buy the Miami-based chain for about $4 billion on Sept. 2, an obvious question was: why?

Burger King may be the world’s No. 2 hamburger chain, but it’s a distant runner-up, with 12,174 restaurants worldwide vs. 32,466 for McDonald’s (MCD). McDonald’s averages about twice the sales volume per U.S. outlet, and its stock has far outperformed that of its rival on the strength of new products such as coffee drinks and smoothies. Burger King, in contrast, has seemed fixated on hawking a $1 double cheeseburger—now $1.29 following a bitter lawsuit with franchisees who claim it’s a money loser. The chain has also narrowed its target audience, chasing young men with cheeky ads, while McDonald’s has gone for broad family appeal. Leer más “The Challenges Facing Burger King Buyer 3G Capital”

Can the Brazilians Rescue Burger King?

“I’ve been to this movie a few times.” Such was the response of one prominent Burger King franchisee, when asked his reaction to the $4 billion leveraged buyout that will take the country’s no. 2 hamburger chain private for the second time in the past decade. In 2002, investment firms TPG Capital, Bain Capital, and Goldman Sachs Capital Partners bought Burger King from Diageo, the U.K.-based spirits maker, for $1.5 billion. The company tapped the public markets in 2006, but now 3G Capital Management, a New York investment firm backed by prominent Brazilian businessmen, has agreed to acquire the chain for $24 a share, a 46% premium on Burger King’s August 31 closing price.

To this skeptical franchisee, these ownership shuffles threaten to mask the more crucial issues facing the company: lousy sales — down 1.4% for the fiscal year ending on June 30, lousy profits down 6.6% during the period and lousy relations between the company and its franchisees last November, the local owners sued Burger King over its insistence that franchises sell Double Cheeseburgers for just $1.


A meal at a Burger King restaurant.

Kevin Lamarque / Reuters

“I’ve been to this movie a few times.” Such was the response of one prominent Burger King franchisee, when asked his reaction to the $4 billion leveraged buyout that will take the country’s no. 2 hamburger chain private for the second time in the past decade. In 2002, investment firms TPG Capital, Bain Capital, and Goldman Sachs Capital Partners bought Burger King from Diageo, the U.K.-based spirits maker, for $1.5 billion. The company tapped the public markets in 2006, but now 3G Capital Management, a New York investment firm backed by prominent Brazilian businessmen, has agreed to acquire the chain for $24 a share, a 46% premium on Burger King’s August 31 closing price.

To this skeptical franchisee, these ownership shuffles threaten to mask the more crucial issues facing the company: lousy sales — down 1.4% for the fiscal year ending on June 30, lousy profits down 6.6% during the period and lousy relations between the company and its franchisees last November, the local owners sued Burger King over its insistence that franchises sell Double Cheeseburgers for just $1. Leer más “Can the Brazilians Rescue Burger King?”