900.000 activaciones Android al día



Andy Rubin Android activaciones 900.000

Andy Rubin, responsable de la división de Android y vicepresidente de ingeniería de Google, ha dado una nueva cifra de activaciones de dispositivos con el sistema operativo del buscador: 900.000 al día. Enfebrero de este año la compañía aseguró que se activaban 850.000 terminales diariamente, mientras que  diciembre del año pasado la cifra era de 700.000.

Como en otras ocasiones, ni el directivo ni la compañía dieron más detalles sobre este dato, como, por ejemplo, cuántos de estos dispositivos son tabletas y cuántos son teléfonos inteligentes.

De hecho, en este caso Rubin publicó la cifra en su cuenta de Twitter como respuesta a los rumores sobre su posible salida de Google. “No tengo planes de abandonar Google”, aseguró en la red social.

Poco después, Rubin explicó en Google+ que todo se había debido a la ayuda que había prestado a un grupo de amigos, a quienes cedió espacio para sus oficinas en su incubadora de Los Altos.

En cualquier caso, las 900.000 activaciones diarias suponen un crecimiento de aproximadamente un 80% respecto a junio del año pasado, cuando se activaban 500.000 dispositivos al día.

The Elephants in the Room at MWC 2012

Recently Fast Company ran a lengthy piece on the four companies that will dominate the tech economy in the next ten years: Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Google. All four are tremendously powerful companies that each started in one category (book selling, search engine, etc.) and are branching out to disrupt adjacent categories. Because of this, they are all coming into conflict with one another. And they are all strong forces in mobile.

So it is strange being at Mobile World Congress where these brands have minimal, if any, presence. Apple has no official presence, but its products are everywhere either in reality (almost all attendees have iPhones) or by proxy (the iPhone is what triggered the smartphone revolution that is driving most of the business here). Amazon seems completely absent, and Facebook was involved in a talk and has a nondescript booth in one of the less trafficked halls.


By Adam Richardson – http://designmind.frogdesign.com

Recently Fast Company ran a lengthy piece on the four companies that will dominate the tech economy in the next ten years: Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Google. All four are tremendously powerful companies that each started in one category (book selling, search engine, etc.) and are branching out to disrupt adjacent categories. Because of this, they are all coming into conflict with one another. And they are all strong forces in mobile.

So it is strange being at Mobile World Congress where these brands have minimal, if any, presence. Apple has no official presence, but its products are everywhere either in reality (almost all attendees have iPhones) or by proxy (the iPhone is what triggered the smartphone revolution that is driving most of the business here). Amazon seems completely absent, and Facebook was involved in a talk and has a nondescript booth in one of the less trafficked halls.

The last of the four is Google. Google is here via Motorola and Android of course, though the Google name appears nowhere on their Motorola booth or the massive (and very fun and crowded) Android booth. Android is everywhere – in many ways I see this show as Android World, analogous to Macworld but on a massively larger scale. Last year at MWC I asked “Will Android rule the world?” A year later, that hasn’t come to pass fully, but the expansion of Android’s footprint even in the last 12 months is astonishing.

All the major announcements save for one (Nokia/Windows) here have revolved around Android: HTC, Asus, Sony, LG, Huawei, Panasonic, Samsung. Android has become almost a separate brand, and is easily Google’s best branding success since, well, Google. Android chief Andy Rubin boasted that 850,000 new Android devices are being activated daily, up from 700,000 last December, and 500,000 in November. They’ll hit the magic one million a day very soon I’m sure. (But it does beg the question: if everyone I see at the show, and almost everyone I see in the San Francisco bay area has iPhones – who’s buying Android devices?)

But Google itself is ironically next to Facebook with an even smaller “booth”:

AVP of Marketing Strategy Adam Richardson is the author of Innovation X: Why a Company’s Toughest Problems are its Greatest Advantage. His book is the manual for leaders looking for clarity about the emerging challenges facing their businesses. You can follow Adam on Twitter @richardsona.

850k Daily Android Activations, 300m Total Devices, Says Andy Rubin

Mobile World Congress is currently underway in Barcelona and Android is now the driving platform. Google’s OS is behind the wheel and steering the mobile industry back towards Mountain View.

In many ways the mobile platform war feels like the desktop race of the early ’90s. Apple had a huge lead, refused to license and is now about to be overtaken by hordes of nondescript clones. But in this race the main competitor is Google rather than Microsoft and the devices are smartphones instead of beige desktops. It’s just a matter of time until Android overtakes iOS now.


Andy-Rubin

Explosive growth. That’s Android. Google’s mobile platform is up 250% over last year and, according to Andy Rubin, SVP, Mobile and Digital Content, Google is seeing 850,000 activations every day. In all he states there are 300 million Google-sanctioned Android devices roaming the world with 12 million of those being tablets. That number doesn’t even include devices like the Kindle Fire that do not use Google services.

It’s all about the ecosystem, notes Rubin on theGoogle Mobile Blog. Last year at Mobile World Congress the company there were more than 150k apps in the Android Market. Now, in the early months of 2012, there are more than 450k apps available. Schmidt might have been right. Android is getting so large that devs might start producing apps for Android first rather than iOS. Leer más “850k Daily Android Activations, 300m Total Devices, Says Andy Rubin”

Google’s Music Service to Launch by Christmas [REPORT]

“Finally here’s an entity with the reach, resources and wherewithal to take on iTunes as a formidable competitor by tying it into search and Android mobile platform. What you’ll have is a very powerful player in the market that’s good for the music business,” the source said.

Right now, the ever-more-popular swarm of Android phones have an integration with Amazon’s MP3 store, but it’s not the best-integrated solution. If Google can perfect a music downloading system and include some of the mobile-desktop syncing features we saw at Google I/O, they just might have a killer app on their hands — one that would continue to allow Android to successfully challenge Apple’s iPhone in the mobile market, too.


Jolie O’Dell

Apple may get a nasty surprise this holiday season; rumors are swirling that Google’s Andy Rubin is planning on a holiday-season launch for the search behemoth’s new music download service.

According to a Reuters report, Rubin, the Google VP Engineering who oversees Android development, has been deep in talks with record labels and “hopes to have the service up and running by Christmas.”

Google’s service would be an iTunes challenger that would be deeply connected to the Android mobile operating system. As we reported over the summer, it seems the company plans to first launch a music download service and progress to an online subscription service by next year. Ultimately, “Google Music” would be a cloud-based subscription service with the ability to stream directly to Android mobile devices.

An anonymous record label exec confirmed to the newswire that Google was, indeed, in talks with labels about launching such a service and that labels aren’t at all upset about the prospect. Leer más “Google’s Music Service to Launch by Christmas [REPORT]”