Digital Marketing Roadmaps – @intersection1 by Mark Smiciklas


social media strategy roadmap

Are you a fan of those BIG strategic reports? You know… the ones that never get read, gather cobwebs at the back of your filing cabinet or get used to keep the door to your office propped open.

You will be happy to know that your Intersection Digital Marketing Road Map will be presented in a visual, concise and easy to read format.

You will receive a straightforward, no-nonsense plan that includes sets of strategies, tactics and objectives for your organization to work through over a six to twelve month period.

The following areas make up the framework that’s used to design your digital road map:

  1. Research
  2. Planning
  3. Implementation
  4. Management
  5. Measurement

The end result is a manageable plan that is customized to your specific marketing and communication needs – and takes into account the capacity of your organization.

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Plugging into the Future of Humanity: Exploring the Human API – thxz @briansolis


The Internet of Things is bigger than we may realize.
http://www.briansolis.com

We are experiencing a shift from a world of inanimate objects and reactive devices to a world where data, intelligence, and computing are distributed, ubiquitous, and networked. My fellow analysts and I at Altimeter Group refer to the Internet of Things (IoT) as the Sentient World. It’s the idea that inanimate objects gain the ability to perceive things, perform tasks, adapt, or help you adapt over time. And, it’s the future of the Internet and consumer electronics.

In 2008, the number of things connected to the Internet exceeded the number of people on earth. By 2020, it’s expected that there will be 50 billion things connected.

A network of things creates an incredible information ecosystem that connects the online and physical world through a series of transactions. In a world where data becomes a natural bi-product of these exchanges, developers, businesses, and users alike are faced with the reality that data isn’t only big, its volume and benefits are also overwhelming.

Did you know that the world creates 2.5 quintillion bytes of new data every day? According to IBM, 90% of the data in the world today has been created in the last two years alone.

Considering the relationship between the Internet, data, and devices, I can’t help but think about Marshall McLuhan’s ominous words, “The more data banks record about each one of us, the less we exist.”

FUL ARTICLE 🙂

With the Internet of Things, that data takes residence in the cloud with various devices and apps siphoning and funneling information in and out, requiring an incredible amount of vision and architecture to organize, analyze, and present it in a way that makes sense while also offering insight and utility. Instead of eclipsing our individuality, I believe the future may reveal the exact opposite. There’s a sense of empowerment and personalization that emerges and, along the way, we subconsciously and consciously begin to crave it. We become insatiable in our pursuit of personalized feedback and it may, in fact, define us.

The Convergence of Devices, Data and the Net

We’re starting to realize the magic of the IoT today in some of the most basic aspects of our lives. While at Le Web, the audience was introduced to Lockitron, a clever system that combines a mobile app, a household device that mounts to existing door locks, and the Internet to open and close doors remotely. I immediately thought of a partnership with Airbnb to give renters peace of mind in controlling their rentals.

Nest is disrupting the long dormant world of thermostats by connecting mobile devices to existing thermostats (heating/air conditioning) with the simplicity and elegance of an iPod. But it’s more than controlling energy and temperatures remotely, Nest learns and begins to adapt without input.

Square’s Jack Dorsey has disrupted the age old world of payment systems by transforming mobile devices into cash registers, connecting money, data, and the net into one frictionless transaction. It’s the data part that represents something so much more however. In that regard, Dorsey sees the real value beyond the transaction—where the swipe and the receipt ultimately become a communication medium. In his view, payments represent “a necessary transaction” to create a channel where merchants learn more about individual consumers and equally, consumers learn more about their behavior.

The Convergence of People, Devices, Data and the Net

When I marvel at the future of the Internet of Things, I can’t help but think about another often shared idea from McLuhan that, “the medium is the message.”

There’s more to smart appliances and devices than utility or remotely controlling our surroundings. The underlying current of this powerful information exchange are the experiences that surround and emanate from each transaction.

What if the medium wasn’t just the device, the medium was us?

FUL ARTICLE 🙂

How Brands Brace for #Crisis in the Social Media Age: The Playbook – thnxz @SocialOgilvy @willcaggiano


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The recent hack of @AP and subsequent Wall Street panic slash Dow plunge has once again showed how an alarming event in social media can have a damaging effect.

All sorts of social media crises are on the rise – not just brands seeing their accounts hacked, but errant four-letter words uttered in official tweets, ill-thought hashtags used as “bashtags” by critics, mistreatment of highly vocal highly influential customers and tone-deaf communications during natural tragedies – just to name a few. Sadly, the majority of these sort of #fails could have been prevented with proper preparation on the brands’ part, according to research by the Altimeter Group.

We’ve witnessed first-hand the growing risk brands now face. We’ve seen how social has empowered everyone from the consumer watchdog to the “vocal minority” to the socialized activist group. Try picturing “United Breaks Guitars” or Motrin Moms or “Artic Ready” without social media and you simply can’t conjure the same effect. Social media has transmuted the news cycle – local news swiftly becomes a global story and the iPhone-wielding bystander spawns tomorrow’s front page.

Full article 🙂

So what is a brand to do when faced with a crisis? More importantly, how should a brand prepare for a crisis?

We set out to answer these questions and ended up writing “Our Playbook for Digital Crisis Management 3.0.” Born out of our global experience preparing for and responding to brand and corporate crises, it’s now part of our global training program.

“…need for social producers” | lgmsocialmedia.es


 

I can’t be the only one to notice this…infographics, “viral” videos, Like and Retweet campaigns, they all seem to be trying a bit too hard lately. For example, most infographics I see today are no more than visual press releases with graphical elements tied to information…and then more information…but wait, then more information. If this was just about visualizing scrolls of information, then anyone using free infographic generating tools and a list of interesting data points could make pinteresting graphics. The key is to think less about the packaging and more about the story you want to tell. But even more importantly, it’s time to put the social in social media and craft the story you want people to talk about and share.

It’s not every day that I focus on social media tactics. However, I’m sharing this post to address a growing concern among social media and digital strategists and those to whom they report as to why their content performs at lackluster levels. Much of what we see in our news feeds and social streams is adequate but not yet representative of what’s possible. However, if creative professionals and brands overall do not understand what it takes to make content or campaigns engaging, optimism and support for experimentation fades and as such, budgets dwindle.

Rebecca Lieb, my colleague at Altimeter Group, tracks digital advertising and media. Along with Jeremiah Owyang, they published a new report on the integration of Paid, Earned, and Owned Media. She shared with me the importance of not only shareability, but also integration into an overall content strategy, “A common content marketing misapprehension is that it equals social media. Content production is tactical. Its desired result, good content, must be informed with strategies and goals related to customer experience, journeys, sharability and its correlation and integration with both paid and earned media.”

Re-imagining Content as Social Objects Leer más ““…need for social producers” | lgmsocialmedia.es”

12 tendencias de consumo para 2012

trendwatching.com es una firma de tendencias independiente y dogmática, que escanea el globo en busca de las tendencias de consumo, insights e ideas de negocio prácticas más prometedoras. Para lo último y mejor, confiamos en nuestra red de cientos de ojeadores
en más de 120 países mundialmente.

Para profundizar en estas tendencias, aconsejo la lectura de este Briefing de Trendwatching, es de lo más interesante sobre todo de cara a introducir nuevas ideas e innovaciones.


http://www.trendwatching.com/

Trendwatching - Sellsumers - april 2009

trendwatching.com es una firma de tendencias independiente y dogmática, que escanea el globo en busca de las tendencias de consumo, insights e ideas de negocio prácticas más prometedoras. Para lo último y mejor, confiamos en nuestra red de cientos de ojeadores
en más de 120 países mundialmente.

Para profundizar en estas tendencias, aconsejo la lectura de este Briefing de Trendwatching, es de lo más interesante sobre todo de cara a introducir nuevas ideas e innovaciones.

The Four Best Questions From Social Week

Did you miss Social Week? Heaven forbid. It was a whole week dedicated to people talking to each other. Or maybe the name Social Media Week was already taken and Social Week touched on the same theme.

Whatever the purpose, I wound up taking part in a panel discussion hosted by the Direct Marketing Association, and it was one of the more thought-provoking sessions I’ve joined. Part of that’s to the credit of moderator David Dowd from Buddy Media, and the rest goes to the expert and candid panel.

Instead of rehashing the questions that Dowd brought up, there were a bunch of others that the panelists dove into that are at least as pressing. Here are some highlights, along with my best attempts at answers:


http://www.marketersstudio.com/

Did you miss Social Week? Heaven forbid. It was a whole week dedicated to people talking to each other. Or maybe the name Social Media Week was already taken and Social Week touched on the same theme.

Whatever the purpose, I wound up taking part in a panel discussion hosted by the Direct Marketing Association, and it was one of the more thought-provoking sessions I’ve joined. Part of that’s to the credit of moderator David Dowd from Buddy Media, and the rest goes to the expert and candid panel.

Instead of rehashing the questions that Dowd brought up, there were a bunch of others that the panelists dove into that are at least as pressing. Here are some highlights, along with my best attempts at answers: Leer más “The Four Best Questions From Social Week”

Report: 8 Success Criteria for Facebook Page Marketing

Recently we contributed to a report from Jeremiah Owyang and crew over at Altimeter. They just released it last week and we would like to share it here. They drew conclusions from a variety of sources to end up with the “8 Criteria” – most of which I agree with and find useful. They then go on to “grade” a couple of dozen brands in terms of their overall “maturity” in Facebook marketing. Here are the 8 Criteria:

* Set Community Expectations
* Provide Cohesive Branding
* Be Up To Date
* Live Authenticity
* Participate in Dialog
* Enable Peer-to-Peer Interactions
* Foster Advocacy
* Solicit a Call-to-Action

Forget my knee-jerk objection to using what sounds like such paternalistic terms (”maturity,” ” infantile,” etc…) there is some sense here…

Success in this space comes with experience. You can read all the blog posts and reports you want but until you are trying to activate in Facebook, you will never accrue enough learning and, I guess, maturity.


by John Bell

Recently we contributed to a report from Jeremiah Owyang and crew over at Altimeter. They just released it last week and we would like to share it here. They drew conclusions from a variety of sources to end up with the “8 Criteria” – most of which I agree with and find useful. They then go on to “grade” a couple of dozen brands in terms of their overall “maturity” in Facebook marketing.  Here are the 8 Criteria:

  • Set Community Expectations
  • Provide Cohesive Branding
  • Be Up To Date
  • Live Authenticity
  • Participate in Dialog
  • Enable Peer-to-Peer Interactions
  • Foster Advocacy
  • Solicit a Call-to-Action

Forget my knee-jerk objection to using what sounds like such paternalistic terms (”maturity,” ” infantile,” etc…)  there is some sense here…

Success in this space comes with experience. You can read all the blog posts and reports you want but until you are trying to activate in Facebook, you will never accrue enough learning and, I guess, maturity.

Ranking is Transitory

I do object to their ranking of the brands. A simple spot-check makes me question it. Last week, we launched the reinvented Ford Explorer via Facebook and it was an awesome experience and a talk about “maturity.”  Ford has been adding to its social media work with influencers with a terrific approach to social grassroots via Facebook. Ford should be higher but perhaps its all too new to be in the report, after all it takes time to write a 26-page document.

Lots of useful stuff here.

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