5 Ways to Help Your Clients Network

Another great thing about being a freelancer is the number and diversity of clients you can have. By introducing them to each other, you are creating valuable connections that will likely result in more work for you. If you can help your clients be successful, it’s almost a sure bet that you will benefit, too.

Here are 5 ways to introduce clients to each other:

Drink More – Ok, maybe not alcohol, but schedule a coffee meeting between two or three clients that share a similar industry (but not direct competitors). Introduce them to each other, and see how the conversation goes.


Another great thing about being a freelancer is the number and diversity of clients you can have.  By introducing them to each other, you are creating valuable connections that will likely result in more work for you.  If you can help your clients be successful, it’s almost a sure bet that you will benefit, too.

Here are 5 ways to introduce clients to each other:

Drink More – Ok, maybe not alcohol, but schedule a coffee meeting between two or three clients that share a similar industry (but not direct competitors).  Introduce them to each other, and see how the conversation goes.

Eat More – Host a BBQ and invite a few of the clients that you enjoy working with.  Don’t have a place to have a BBQ?  Plan a picnic in a local park or at the beach.  It doesn’t have to be a large expense, just tell them that you’ve reserved a spot, and they are welcome to bring their own picnic lunch and have a relaxing day. Leer más “5 Ways to Help Your Clients Network”

Diageo battles to overcome China’s taste for fiery ‘white spirit’ baijiu

The bad news is that, for now at least, the Chinese love their homegrown liquor – a fiery grain spirit called baijiu (which literally translates ‘white spirit’ and to a foreigner can taste pretty much the same) – a great deal more than fancy foreign brands like Black Label or Smirnoff.

China imported just 4m cases of foreign spirits in 2009 – equating to a near-negligible 1.4pc of the global trade, according to the drinks industry’s research consultancy International Wine & Spirits Record (IWSR).

As so often with a China “growth story” it is the potential size of the prize that keeps foreign businesses interested, which perhaps explains why Jeff Chau, general manager of Diageo China, retains a glass-half-full attitude despite the still-modest sales.

“It is true that international branded spirits are still only 1pc of the total alcohol consumed in China,” he said, “but that’s why we see such massive potential here. Ninety-nine per cent of Chinese are still drinking baijiu or beer and we hope to change that.”


China is a nation that loves its liquor – and that’s the good news for international drinks companies like Diageo hoping to tap into what is a potentially massive market for fine cognacs and malt whiskey in the years to come.

By Peter Foster in Beijing

Baijiu made locally in Haikou, Hainan - love of the homegrown alcohol has made it hard for Diageo's Vodka to make inroads in China.

Baijiu made locally in Haikou, Hainan – love of the homegrown alcohol has made it hard for Diageo’s Vodka to make inroads in China.

The bad news is that, for now at least, the Chinese love their homegrown liquor – a fiery grain spirit called baijiu (which literally translates ‘white spirit’ and to a foreigner can taste pretty much the same) – a great deal more than fancy foreign brands like Black Label or Smirnoff.

China imported just 4m cases of foreign spirits in 2009 – equating to a near-negligible 1.4pc of the global trade, according to the drinks industry’s research consultancy International Wine & Spirits Record (IWSR).

As so often with a China “growth story” it is the potential size of the prize that keeps foreign businesses interested, which perhaps explains why Jeff Chau, general manager of Diageo China, retains a glass-half-full attitude despite the still-modest sales.

“It is true that international branded spirits are still only 1pc of the total alcohol consumed in China,” he said, “but that’s why we see such massive potential here. Ninety-nine per cent of Chinese are still drinking baijiu or beer and we hope to change that.” Leer más “Diageo battles to overcome China’s taste for fiery ‘white spirit’ baijiu”

In Recession, Drinking Moves from Bars to Home

Erin Ryan / Corbis

When the going gets tough, the tough, um, go drinking. That’s the word from a new Gallup poll showing that 67% of Americans are hitting the bottle, the most since 1985. Another sign of challenging economic times: more and more of those rounds are happening in the kitchen, not at the corner pub.

A new report by Mintel International, a market-research firm, shows that a growing number of Americans are guzzling down wine and spirits at home as opposed to in bars and restaurants, and many are trading down to cheaper brands as they seek fiscally conscious ways to party in a sluggish economy. (See pictures of booze under a microscope.)

“We used to say that [alcohol consumption] was recession-proof or at least recession-resilient, but the rules have changed in this recession,” says David Henkes, a vice president at Technomic, a research and consulting firm. [Más…]

Though the recession technically ended more than a year ago, high unemployment, stagnant wages, falling home prices and shrinking retirement savings have shattered consumer confidence and affected where and how much Americans imbibe, according to the Mintel report. Traffic to restaurants has plunged, with fine-dining establishments taking the biggest hit as businesses pull back on entertaining clients and consumers keep a tighter grip on their pocketbooks. (See a new generation of Mediterranean wine.)

Sales of alcoholic beverages at bars and restaurants fell 4.6% in 2009, while sales at liquor stores, supermarkets and other retailers for “at home” drinking rose 1.2%, the report said. Americans are gulping 10 drinks on average each month at home, compared with only 5.7 drinks in bars and restaurants, the report notes. (See the top 10 bad beverage ideas.)


Erin Ryan / Corbis

When the going gets tough, the tough, um, go drinking. That’s the word from a new Gallup poll showing that 67% of Americans are hitting the bottle, the most since 1985. Another sign of challenging economic times: more and more of those rounds are happening in the kitchen, not at the corner pub.

A new report by Mintel International, a market-research firm, shows that a growing number of Americans are guzzling down wine and spirits at home as opposed to in bars and restaurants, and many are trading down to cheaper brands as they seek fiscally conscious ways to party in a sluggish economy. (See pictures of booze under a microscope.)

“We used to say that [alcohol consumption] was recession-proof or at least recession-resilient, but the rules have changed in this recession,” says David Henkes, a vice president at Technomic, a research and consulting firm. Leer más “In Recession, Drinking Moves from Bars to Home”