THE TEEN TRANSITION: ADOLESCENTS OF TODAY, ADULTS OF TOMORROW – ThnXz @Nielsen


Young adults are a crucial segment for businesses and advertisers. As the 18-24-year-old demographic expands faster than any other young age group, so does its viewing and purchasing power. Today’s 17-year-olds will play a significant role in the young adult segment of the future, which is why it’s crucial to get to know them now in order to better understand who they’ll be tomorrow.

WHO ARE TODAY’S TEENS?

Today’s teens and young adults are quite the multicultural bunch—with purchasing power to boot. In fact, the 12-17, 18-24 and 25-34 groups are almost identically multicultural, as 42 percent of each comprises Hispanics, African-Americans and Asian-Americans. This is only the tip of the iceberg—U.S. Census data shows that African-Americans, Asian-Americans and Hispanics will generate the vast majority of the U.S. population growth over the next few decades.

Teens have serious purchase potential. In 2012, 29 percent of U.S. teens lived in high-income homes ($100k+), while only 25 percent of young adults lived in households within this same income bracket. There were also more teen households with middle incomes ($30k-$100k) than those of young adults. Finally, fewer teens lived in lower-income homes ($30k) than their slightly older counterparts.

DEVICE OWNERSHIP DETERMINES VIEWING

Within teen households, smartphones and tablets are growing faster than any other device. From Q4 2011 to Q4 2012, smartphone penetration increased by 45 percent among teens, 32 percent among adults 18-24 and 22 percent among adults 25-34.

Laptop penetration increases as teens age into young adulthood, but begins to decline when young adults enter their late 20s. Laptop penetration is highest among young adults, but all three age groups (12-17, 18-24, 25-34) have increased their laptop ownership over the past year.

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Though young adults view most content on television, they are increasing their video watching
on other devices. According to Nielsen’s Fourth-Quarter 2012 Cross-Platform Report, all
consumers under the age of 34 increased their video consumption via mobile and the Internet
from Q4 2011 to Q4 2012.

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While everyone under 34 is spending less time in front of the TV, viewing preferences aren’t
consistent across the 12-17, 18-24 and 25-34 year old groups. For example, teens like to
watch on mobile more than anyone else. In fact, they watched 18 percent more video on their
mobile phones than persons 18-24 and 46 percent more than persons 25-34, in Q4 2012.
While teens are watching more content on mobile devices, they watch less video online than
young adults. In fact, persons 18-24 spent almost 3 times more time watching video on the
Internet than teens 12-17 in Q4 2012.
Leer más “THE TEEN TRANSITION: ADOLESCENTS OF TODAY, ADULTS OF TOMORROW – ThnXz @Nielsen”

Who’s Using Twitter And How They’re Using It

As Twitter continues to wax in popularity, the disparity of Twitter users across all demographics continues to wane. But as the Pew study also indicates, there is still a large portion of Internet users who continue to have no involvement with the site.


by Ethan Bloch
http://www.flowtown.com

101228-FLOW-WHOT

As Twitter continues to wax in popularity, the disparity of Twitter users across all demographics continues to wane. But as the Pew study also indicates, there is still a large portion of Internet users who continue to have no involvement with the site.

Read more: http://www.flowtown.com/blog/whos-using-twitter-and-how-theyre-using-it#ixzz19hKUlkwJ

Exploring the psychological motives of racism

The recent controversy ignited by talk show host Dr. Laura Schlessinger is just one of many incidents in recent memory that has put the public spotlight on the topic of racism in America. On the one hand, many sectors of American culture seem to be very engaged in efforts to promote racial equality and the celebration of diversity. On the other hand, public spectacles such as the Dr. Laura incident, journalistic coverage of social problems and injustices that involve race as a variable (e.g., the government response to Katrina), and scientific research in the fields of psychology and sociology indicate that racism and prejudice in general are still major problems our society faces.

Though we often hear about deep-rooted institutional and cultural forces that contribute to racism, it seems like we less often hear about the psychological motives and processes involved. In other words, psychologically, what does being racist do for a person? Below I provide a list of psychological motives that appear to contribute to racism.


The recent controversy ignited by talk show host Dr. Laura Schlessinger is just one of many incidents in recent memory that has put the public spotlight on the topic of racism in America. On the one hand, many sectors of American culture seem to be very engaged in efforts to promote racial equality and the celebration of diversity. On the other hand, public spectacles such as the Dr. Laura incident, journalistic coverage of social problems and injustices that involve race as a variable (e.g., the government response to Katrina), and scientific research in the fields of psychology and sociology indicate that racism and prejudice in general are still major problems our society faces.

Though we often hear about deep-rooted institutional and cultural forces that contribute to racism, it seems like we less often hear about the psychological motives and processes involved. In other words, psychologically, what does being racist do for a person? Below I provide a list of psychological motives that appear to contribute to racism.

Leer más “Exploring the psychological motives of racism”

The end of the racial digital divide?

Posted by Barbara Kiviat

Over the past decade or so, there has been a lot of hand wringing about how minorities in the U.S. use computers and the Internet at lower rates than whites. That ostensibly handicaps them in realms from searching for a job to finding the best deal on a car. A 1999 report from the Commerce Department found that “Black and Hispanic households are approximately one-third as likely to have home Internet access as households of Asian/Pacific Islander descent, and roughly two-fifths as likely as White households.” Just last year, the Pew Research Center reported that “by a 59%-to-45% margin, whites are more likely to go online using a computer on a typical day than are African Americans.”

Ready for the tables to turn? A new report from Pew’s Internet and American Life Project shows that blacks and Hispanics are actually on the Internet more often than whites… when it comes to getting there by way of a mobile phone. First of all, a higher percentage of blacks and Hispanics own mobile phones. And then more of them use their phones to access the Internet. While 33% of white mobile phone users go online with their device, 46% of blacks do and 51% of Hispanics. (Pew notes that the Hispanics it surveyed were all “English-speaking.”)


Posted by Barbara Kiviat

Over the past decade or so, there has been a lot of hand wringing about how minorities in the U.S. use computers and the Internet at lower rates than whites. That ostensibly handicaps them in realms from searching for a job to finding the best deal on a car. A 1999 report from the Commerce Department found that “Black and Hispanic households are approximately one-third as likely to have home Internet access as households of Asian/Pacific Islander descent, and roughly two-fifths as likely as White households.” Just last year, the Pew Research Center reported that “by a 59%-to-45% margin, whites are more likely to go online using a computer on a typical day than are African Americans.”

Ready for the tables to turn? A new report from Pew’s Internet and American Life Project shows that blacks and Hispanics are actually on the Internet more often than whites… when it comes to getting there by way of a mobile phone. First of all, a higher percentage of blacks and Hispanics own mobile phones. And then more of them use their phones to access the Internet. While 33% of white mobile phone users go online with their device, 46% of blacks do and 51% of Hispanics. (Pew notes that the Hispanics it surveyed were all “English-speaking.”) Leer más “The end of the racial digital divide?”

General Motors Is Racist. Period.

Target Market News posted the story below, which demonstrates once again that General Motors is full of shit. Back in 2007, former GM executive Mark LaNeve went on record to insist the automaker would continue to partner with minority advertising agencies. As it turned out, LaNeve was a fucking liar. Now another GM honcho actually admitted that White agencies would handle assignments usually awarded to minority firms. Wow. A corporation goes bankrupt—and begs for bailout money from the nation’s first Black president—yet still screws Black shops while conspiring with the White agencies responsible for producing work that has consistently failed to ignite sales. Only in America.




Target Market News posted the story below, which demonstrates once again that General Motors is full of shit. Back in 2007, former GM executive Mark LaNeve went on record to insist the automaker would continue to partner with minority advertising agencies. As it turned out, LaNeve was a fucking liar. Now another GM honcho actually admitted that White agencies would handle assignments usually awarded to minority firms. Wow. A corporation goes bankrupt—and begs for bailout money from the nation’s first Black president—yet still screws Black shops while conspiring with the White agencies responsible for producing work that has consistently failed to ignite sales. Only in America. Leer más “General Motors Is Racist. Period.”

Why Twitter Is a Ripe Target for Multicultural Marketers

African-American and Hispanic usage above average

Evidence from Edison Research’s “Twitter Usage in America: 2010” survey suggests that marketers targeting multicultural audiences would do well to note the service’s diverse ethnic makeup. [Más…]

Edison found that African-Americans make up nearly one-quarter of the US Twitter population, twice their share of the total population of the country. eMarketer estimates non-Hispanic African-Americans make up just 11% of US Internet users. Hispanics were also overrepresented on Twitter, at 17% versus 13.4% of the US Internet population.


African-American and Hispanic usage above average

Evidence from Edison Research’s “Twitter Usage in America: 2010” survey suggests that marketers targeting multicultural audiences would do well to note the service’s diverse ethnic makeup. Leer más “Why Twitter Is a Ripe Target for Multicultural Marketers”

The Help In Black & White.

“I was labeled ‘psychologically sick,’ ‘morally senile,’ and was accused of possessing ‘a vile racist imagination,’” Styron recalled in his introduction to the 1994 Modern Library edition of the book. “The major complaint was … how dare a white man write so intimately of the black experience, even presuming to become Nat Turner by speaking in the first person?”

Forty-two years later, “The Help” (2009), a novel narrated, in large part, by African-American maids in the Deep South of the early 1960s, was published. Instead of scorn and enmity, author Kathryn Stockett, who is white, has been greeted with rapturous reviews, spectacular sales and a movie deal.

What’s the difference?




From The Chicago Tribune…

White novelist tackles truths of black life in ‘The Help

Julia Keller
Cultural Critic

The last time a white writer tried to give prolonged fictional voice to the thoughts and emotions of an oppressed black person in a major novel, the result was devastating — not for literature, which gained a profound and powerful novel titled “The Confessions of Nat Turner” (1967), but for the life of William Styron, the man who wrote it. Leer más “The Help In Black & White.”