Fashion Brands Still Wary About Using Social Media

When visitors land on fashion and design blog The Lil Bee, they’ll notice something unusual. In the upper right corner of the page sits a graphical rendering of poppy flowers sprouting across the page with the message “You’ve found a poppy” and an invitation to “follow the poppy trail.”

The Lil Bee is one of hundreds of blogs that are part of a network stitched together this month in a social media campaign from fashion brand Coach. The bloggers have added a small piece of code to their sites that acts as a mini-discovery tool, along with a game for users to grow the poppy image on the site by their visits or using Twitter to broadcast a message.

The Poppy Project, which promotes Coach’s Poppy line of affordable but still luxury fashions, is an unusual approach for the fashion world, which has built brands in traditional media with lush images and an aspirational message. These approaches run counter to the ethos of social media, where sharing and connectivity rule the roost.

Coach leaned on Facebook to launch Poppy a year ago. It tapped into its fan base — now nearly 1 million — and gave Facebook fans a gift when they visited the store. In postlaunch research, store managers reported many customers said they initially heard of the line from Facebook, according to David Duplantis, svp of global Web and digital media at Coach. “We felt the organic nature of poppies growing in social media was a home run,” he said.

Yet many fashion brands, particularly those in the luxury category, remain wary of social media. Instead, visit the sites of major fashion names like Louis Vuitton and Gucci, and you’ll find pretty much the digital equivalent of Vogue: lots of glossy photos and little in the way of interaction. Diana Hong, creative director at Create the Group, a New York digital shop that specializes in fashion, said the rather simple step of adding a Facebook “Like” button can worry fashion clients who zealously guard their brand image around exclusivity.

“Being open to social media has been challenging because it’s almost too open for them,” she said. “They’re worried about how their brand is perceived.”

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Brian Morrissey, Adweek
When visitors land on fashion and design blog The Lil Bee, they’ll notice something unusual. In the upper right corner of the page sits a graphical rendering of poppy flowers sprouting across the page with the message “You’ve found a poppy” and an invitation to “follow the poppy trail.”

The Lil Bee is one of hundreds of blogs that are part of a network stitched together this month in a social media campaign from fashion brand Coach. The bloggers have added a small piece of code to their sites that acts as a mini-discovery tool, along with a game for users to grow the poppy image on the site by their visits or using Twitter to broadcast a message.

The Poppy Project, which promotes Coach’s Poppy line of affordable but still luxury fashions, is an unusual approach for the fashion world, which has built brands in traditional media with lush images and an aspirational message. These approaches run counter to the ethos of social media, where sharing and connectivity rule the roost.

Coach leaned on Facebook to launch Poppy a year ago. It tapped into its fan base — now nearly 1 million — and gave Facebook fans a gift when they visited the store. In postlaunch research, store managers reported many customers said they initially heard of the line from Facebook, according to David Duplantis, svp of global Web and digital media at Coach. “We felt the organic nature of poppies growing in social media was a home run,” he said.

Yet many fashion brands, particularly those in the luxury category, remain wary of social media. Instead, visit the sites of major fashion names like Louis Vuitton and Gucci, and you’ll find pretty much the digital equivalent of Vogue: lots of glossy photos and little in the way of interaction. Diana Hong, creative director at Create the Group, a New York digital shop that specializes in fashion, said the rather simple step of adding a Facebook “Like” button can worry fashion clients who zealously guard their brand image around exclusivity.

“Being open to social media has been challenging because it’s almost too open for them,” she said. “They’re worried about how their brand is perceived.” Leer más “Fashion Brands Still Wary About Using Social Media”

Who Needs The Internet Anyway?


– Mark Dolliver, Adweek

Twenty-one percent of America‘s adult population is a big market—an audience marketers would be unlikely to shun. But perhaps they overlook it as they seek to exploit the latest iterations of the Internet. Odd as it may seem to the Web-obsessed, a report issued this month by the Pew Research Center‘s Internet & American Life Project says 21 percent of U.S. adults don’t use the Internet at all. Leer más “Who Needs The Internet Anyway?”

The top 10 soccer commercials ever made

In celebration of this Sunday’s World Cup final, we’ve put together our picks for the 10 best soccer commercials we’ve ever seen. Perhaps not surprisingly, the list is dominated by Nike (and Wieden + Kennedy), with Adidas’s soccer spots often seeming to fall a bit short. We left off most of the fluffy stuff (like every Pepsi soccer spot ever done) in favor of the meat and potatoes. The choice for No. 1 is contentious, naturally, so let us know your feelings in the comments section here. That’s also where you can berate us for the spots we left out.


In celebration of this Sunday’s World Cup final, we’ve put together our picks for the 10 best soccer commercials we’ve ever seen. Perhaps not surprisingly, the list is dominated by Nike (and Wieden + Kennedy), with Adidas’s soccer spots often seeming to fall a bit short. We left off most of the fluffy stuff (like every Pepsi soccer spot ever done) in favor of the meat and potatoes. The choice for No. 1 is contentious, naturally, so let us know your feelings in the comments section here. That’s also where you can berate us for the spots we left out.

—Posted by Tim Nudd Leer más “The top 10 soccer commercials ever made”

25 epic commercials that aren’t called ‘1984’


Leo Burnett once said great advertising could be boiled down into three simple messages: “Here’s what we’ve got. Here’s what it will do for you. Here’s how to get it.” Leer más “25 epic commercials that aren’t called ‘1984’”

AdFreak / Latest freak


Stella looks at dying art of hand-painted ads

Up-there

Mother in New York hosted a screening of its short film Up There for Stella Artois at the Grand Hotel on Thursday night. The 13-minute film (embedded after the jump) profiles the waning art of hand-painted advertising while chronicling a 21-day project during which artists from Sky High Murals painted the Belgian beer brand’s “pouring ritual” on a 20-by-50-foot wall in SoHo. The documentary short, directed by Mekanism’s Malcolm Murray, shows the painters, including retired artist Bob Middleton of Mack Sign Company, talking about the years it takes to perfect their artistry. By the time some of the young guys in the film become masters, there may not be much work left for them. So, take a minute to look up and check out the real thing the next time you pass a painted original. It’s advertising’s high art. (Sorry, couldn’t resist.)

—Posted by Eleftheria Parpis

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Hide your incontinence, or not, with Depend

Depends

Here’s the new JWT campaign for Depend adult undergarments. The ads exploit the shame and fear people feel about their incontinence—in particular, about other people finding out about it—under the theme “People know.” But of course, the ads explain that while people can know everything else about you, they don’t have to know about your “condition” (though if you really want to keep it a secret, you shouldn’t leave giant packs of Depends lying around, as the characters in the ads do). See one more TV spot after the jump, along with some print work.

—Posted by Tim Nudd

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Dishwashing soap targeting snowperson set

Magistral- Snowman

Grey Argentina’s Pygmalion-esque ad for Magistral dishwashing soap is well made, but the sudden, heartbreaking finish is cheapened somewhat by the glib tagline. You’d also think the snowman would have had the boiler removed from his house sometime in the distant past, before he went to all the work of building his one true love and having her do his housework. Forgive me, but examining this ad’s internal logic is the only thing keeping me from sobbing like a child on repeat viewings.

—Posted by David Kiefaber

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Ohio not drooling over breast-milk billboard

Breast-milk-satisfies

You can always count on the topic of breastfeeding to spark thoughtful and measured debate—or else hysterical attacks and counterattacks. The latest skirmish in the breastfeeding vs. bottle feeding war is being fought in Ohio, where billboards like the one shown here, from the state health department, have been spotted around Cleveland and Toledo and probably elsewhere. Sure, there’s the implication that formula doesn’t satisfy—but the bigger issue here seems to be just what the heck is up with that baby? One local tells Toledo’s Fox affiliate: “When I first saw it, I thought, you know, I agree with breast milk, it’s fine, but then I saw it with the milk around its mouth and I thought that was so unappealing. The baby’s cute, but I did not like the milk coming out of his mouth.” Cleveland Scene readers are more straightforward. Says one: “The little fella looks SATISFIED AS HELL—like a tit vampire with all the drool and boob milk dripping off his chin.” The Ad Council’s breastfeeding campaign seems boring by comparison. Via @rickuldricks.

—Posted by Tim Nudd

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Quaker Crispy Minis give you strange burps

Quaker-Crispy-Minis

What was BBDO Toronto trying to communicate in this Quaker Crispy Minis spot? Would the prospect of burping butterflies make you want to buy the product? Is each box full of insect larva that mature in your intestines? Sure, that’s a good thing to serve your enemies, but friends are likely to take offense. In the ad’s boardroom scene, a female exec emits gobs of sparkly confetti during her pie-chart presentation. The other corporate drones look like they’d rubber-stamp whatever she’s proposing just to get the hell out of there. Strange, I never get my way at AdFreak no matter what I spew at our editorial meetings.

—Posted by David Gianatasio

http://adweek.blogs.com/adfreak/

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Anal sex not great theme for B2B phone ads


Access-denied-crop

Random sodomy references are rare in B2B advertising, but it happens once in a while. This time, a British company promised to keep people from hacking into your business phone system by showing a woman wrapped in chains with an “Access Denied” sign on her bottom. This was beyond the pale, according to my old friends at the Advertising Standards Authority, which has banned the ad on the grounds that it could cause “serious offense.” The company claims that three of its female employees were OK with it—always a good comeback. Hopefully they’ll be more careful and respectful the next time they attempt to sneak crude sexual innuendo through the back door.

—Posted by David Kiefaber
http://adweek.blogs.com/adfreak/2010/04/anal-sex-not-great-theme-for-b2b-phone-ads.html

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Nestlé gets feisty on Facebook over palm oil


Kitkat1

Nestlé has been in full damage-control mode ever since Greenpeace likened Kit Kats to bloody orangutan fingers. The international chocolatier has posted no fewer than nine Facebook updates defending its use of palm oil, which Greenpeace says is destroying rainforest habitats. However, the company’s outreach doesn’t seem to be winning over the critics. User comments on the official Nestlé Facebook page have been overwhelmingly negative, with administrators twice asking fans to quit using “an altered version of any of our logos.” The brand’s representatives have also lost their patience a few times, snapping back with comments such as this one, which simply must be read in its entirety: “So, let’s see, we have to be well-mannered all the time but it’s perfectly acceptable to refer to us as everything from idiots right the way down to sons of satan with a few obscenities and strange sexual practices thrown in?” I earnestly feel for Nestlé, which has been battered relentlessly in social media for its international policies, but sometimes the best thing to do is just disengage, go get your house in order and come back when heads are a little cooler. Hat tip to @AdLawGuy.

—Posted by David Griner

http://adweek.blogs.com/adfreak/2010/03/nestle-gets-feisty-on-facebook-over-palm-oil.html

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