Guía de estilo para las nuevas páginas de marcas en Facebook


‘Newsweek’ vuelve a los años 60 para conmemorar lo nuevo de Mad Men

Pero no sólo la portada echa la vista atrás a los años de oro de la publicidad. Desde el editorial hasta la publicidad del número de Newsweek del 26 de marzo podrán verse diseños propios de 1965 que harán que el lector se sienta de vuelta a la época de Mad Men por momentos.


marketingdirecto.com

Newsweek

estrenará portada retro la próxima semana.
La publicación ha vuelto a los años 60 con su nueva portada inspirada en Mad Men, a la que acompañará un reportaje , “Mad Men vuelve a la oficina”, sobre la vuelta de la serie a la pequeña pantalla el 25 de marzo, más de un año y medio después de que terminara la última temporada.


Ideas de pequeñas agencias para las medianas empresas

La situación del marketing y la publicidad actual en que las marcas pueden crecer o caer a raíz de un tweet de 140 caracteres, algo que inestabiliza incluso a las multinacionales más importantes, no se ajusta a las pequeñas empresas con pequeños presupuestos. Ad Age Insights ha encuestado a los bloggers de Ad Age’s Small Agency Diary, líderes mundiales de los pequeños clientes pero con grandes preocupaciones. A partir de cinco preguntas sobre cómo medir el retorno de inversión, utilizar los social media, hacer presupuestos para los planes de marketing o qué habilidades y capacidades hay que buscar en una agencia, explican cómo los propietarios de las pequeñas empresas pueden determinar los mejores planes que se ajusten más a sus necesidades.


La situación del marketing y la publicidad actual en que las marcas pueden crecer o caer a raíz de un tweet de 140 caracteres, algo que inestabiliza incluso a las multinacionales más importantes, no se ajusta a las pequeñas empresas con pequeños presupuestos. Ad Age Insights ha encuestado a los bloggers de Ad Age’s Small Agency Diary, líderes mundiales de los pequeños clientes pero con grandes preocupaciones. A partir de cinco preguntas sobre cómo medir el retorno de inversión, utilizar los social media, hacer presupuestos para los planes de marketing o qué habilidades y capacidades hay que buscar en una agencia, explican cómo los propietarios de las pequeñas empresas pueden determinar los mejores planes que se ajusten más a sus necesidades. Leer más “Ideas de pequeñas agencias para las medianas empresas”

Las redes sociales hunden los precios de los anuncios online en un 18%

Un estudio realizado por Comscore revela que aunque las redes sociales lideran el pulso de internet en páginas vistas y en impresiones, no logran capitalizar esto en una mejora de los precios de los anuncios.

Según los datos de Comscore, que se basan en análisis efectuados en Facebook y MySpace, el CPM promedio de las redes sociales se situó en 56 centavos, mientras que el resto de internet logró una media de 2,43 dólares.

La consultora estima que en total las redes sociales disminuyeron el precio de los anuncios online en un 18% en 2009, según informa la revista Ad Age, lo que convierte a Facebook en la diana de los editores de contenido online.


Un estudio realizado por Comscore revela que aunque las redes sociales lideran el pulso de internet en páginas vistas y en impresiones, no logran capitalizar esto en una mejora de los precios de los anuncios.

Según los datos de Comscore, que se basan en análisis efectuados en Facebook y MySpace, el CPM promedio de las redes sociales se situó en 56 centavos, mientras que el resto de internet logró una media de 2,43 dólares.

La consultora estima que en total las redes sociales disminuyeron el precio de los anuncios online en un 18% en 2009, según informa la revista Ad Age, lo que convierte a Facebook en la diana de los editores de contenido online. Leer más “Las redes sociales hunden los precios de los anuncios online en un 18%”

Sharing Locations the Facebook Way

AuthorLindsay
The world anxiously awaits as Facebook promises to unveil its location-based status updates this month.

Okay, maybe not the world… But I, for one, sure am curious!

So far, Facebook has played their cards close to the chest, but it is rumored they will partner with an established location-based social network like Gowalla or Foursquare. Alternatively, they could develop and implement their own system. Either way, Location-Based Social Networks (LBSNs) are picking up steam quickly and Facebook, with their 400M + user base (100M+ mobile), are bound to tip location-sharing over the edge into the mainstream.


Image representing Facebook as depicted in Cru...
Image via CrunchBase
AuthorLindsay
The world anxiously awaits as Facebook promises to unveil its location-based status updates this month.

Okay, maybe not the world… But I, for one, sure am curious!

So far, Facebook has played their cards close to the chest, but it is rumored they will partner with an established location-based social network like Gowalla or Foursquare. Alternatively, they could develop and implement their own system. Either way, Location-Based Social Networks (LBSNs) are picking up steam quickly and Facebook, with their 400M + user base (100M+ mobile), are bound to tip location-sharing over the edge into the mainstream. Leer más “Sharing Locations the Facebook Way”

Diversity By Invitation Only…?

The Advertising Age story on the Super Bowl study featured an excerpt worth examining:

While the study highlights the ad industry’s longstanding problem with diversity, it is also keeping that discrimination investigation in the headlines. This attention, paired with a lack of dialogue with agency leadership, could hinder real change, said American Association of Advertising Agencies CEO Nancy Hill. [Más…] “I think it makes it difficult, especially if agencies aren’t invited to have a discussion,” Ms. Hill, the only agency representative at the press conference today, said of the project’s press-first strategy. “It makes it feel like [the Madison Avenue Project] doesn’t want to have a conversation.”



The Advertising Age story on the Super Bowl study featured an excerpt worth examining:

While the study highlights the ad industry’s longstanding problem with diversity, it is also keeping that discrimination investigation in the headlines. This attention, paired with a lack of dialogue with agency leadership, could hinder real change, said American Association of Advertising Agencies CEO Nancy Hill. Leer más “Diversity By Invitation Only…?”

Should customers be in control?


As social media evolves, I’ve been wondering if the adages we all know still apply. I wrote a post a couple weeks ago about turning the adages upside down; one I left out was “customers are in control.” But should they be?

Over the years, companies have taken heat for customer-unfriendly actions:

  • A decade ago, I was at Fidelity during a communications crisis called “Basic-Gate.”
  • Sprint fired some customers.
  • Ford let out the legal dogs on a brand fan in the “Ranger Station” situation.

But at Fidelity, the customers encourage… Leer más “Should customers be in control?”

Special Report: 80 Years of Ideas – Advertising Age (2)


Advertising Age: 80 Years of Ideas

Advertising Age: 80 Years of Ideas

We Look at the Events, Brands and Trends That Have Shaped Marketing — and the Ones Still to Come

When Ad Age published its first issue in 1930, the stock market had just tanked, and a Great Depression was only beginning. Consumer spending plunged 41% from 1929 to the Depression’s 1933 nadir. A problem for consumer marketing, media and advertising? Actually, a remarkable opportunity. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

Ad Age Video

Covering the Mad Men: Advertising Age at 40

Covering the Mad Men: Advertising Age at 40

Recounting Ad Age’s History in 1970

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) — Back when Don Draper was swilling Scotch in his corner office, debating how to solve Lucky Strike‘s marketing conundrums, Ad Age was all over in the industry. And it was no young pub — in 1970 the publication was already 40 years old. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

From the Great Depression Through the Great Recession: A Brief  History of Marketing

From the Great Depression Through the Great Recession: A Brief History of Marketing

A Look at 80 Highlights From Ad Age’s First 80 Years, Compiled From Our Archives, Ad Age’s Encyclopedia of Advertising and Additional Research

Ad Age’s Bradley Johnson presents a timeline of marketing, media and ad agencies, showing advertising industry developments from 1930 through 2010. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

Back to the Future: Have We Lived Up to Expectations of  Advertising?

Back to the Future: Have We Lived Up to Expectations of Advertising?

From 1977, the Late Biochemist and Science Fiction Legend Isaac Asimov Foretells the Ad Future in 2000

In 1977, Ad Age ran biochemist and science-fiction author Isaac Asimov’s piece forecasting what the advertising “future” would be like in 2000. We’ve reprinted it for our 80th birthday. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

The Cold Truth: No One Does Veggies Quite Like Birds Eye

The Cold Truth: No One Does Veggies Quite Like Birds Eye

Brand’s Identity as a Leader in Frozen Vegetables Stands the Test of Time, and It’s Done So With Little Marketing

CHICAGO (AdAge.com) — Clarence Birdseye didn’t just invent the commercialized flash-freezing process that kept garden greens tasty and convenient for weeks on end; he built the frozen-food category and its infrastructure, including grocery freezer cases and insulated train cars for their safe transport. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

Motorola's Longevity Lies in Its Simple Approach

Motorola’s Longevity Lies in Its Simple Approach

Brand’s Unique Ability to Produce Wide Range of Products Is Secret to Success

CHICAGO (AdAge.com) — Given it’s been around for 80 years, sells to businesses, governments and consumers and has also historically been best-known for many products it no longer makes, Motorola’s brand continues to offer a surprisingly simple — and enduringly effective — proposition. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

Value Of McCann's Industry Influence? Priceless

Value Of McCann’s Industry Influence? Priceless

Groundbreaking Global Strategies, Innovative Operations Set Pioneer Agency Apart From the Rest

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) — From the start, McCann Erickson proved itself a pioneer in the ad business, beating other networks to the globalization trend of the 1980s by several decades. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

Snickers Uses Humor to Satisfy Generations of Hunger

Snickers Uses Humor to Satisfy Generations of Hunger

World’s Best-Selling Candy Bar Has Differentiated Itself With the Idea That It’s More Than Just a Chocolate Snack

CHICAGO (AdAge.com) — Talk about a depression baby with staying power: Snickers, introduced in 1930, is a $2 billion brand proposition today. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

Fisher-Price Plays, Laughs and Grows Into Global Brand

Fisher-Price Plays, Laughs and Grows Into Global Brand

Toy Company Founded in Depression Has Evolved Into ‘Children’s Product Company’ With Multiple Integrations

YORK, Pa. (AdAge.com) — For Fisher-Price, what began as toddler toy-making has grown up into a global brand that is now part of the Mattel empire. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

Fortune Rides the Booms and Busts of Business

Fortune Rides the Booms and Busts of Business

Once-Ambitious Idea Has Consistently Covered the Ups and Downs While Feeling Them Itself

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) — Much like Ad Age, Fortune began life at about the worst possible time for a new business: the dawn of the Great Depression. But it was born, in reality, of success, namely the recent triumph of Henry Luce’s then-young Time magazine, founded in 1923. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

Tums Brand, Like Acid Indigestion, Is Timeless

Tums Brand, Like Acid Indigestion, Is Timeless

Antacid Thrives in Its Journey From Accidental Remedy to Trusted Household Name Remembered Fondly for Jingle

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) — “Tums, Tum-Tum-Tum, Tums!” That famous jingle, set to the dramatic opening bars of the theme from the TV show “Dragnet,” just might be what people remember most about Tums, the famous antacid that was born the same year as Advertising Age. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

Twinkies: Sweet Treat Continues to Delight

Twinkies: Sweet Treat Continues to Delight

Though It’s Had Its Share of Criticism, Cream-Filled Snack Still Takes the Cake When It Comes to Consumer Demand

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) — Twinkies have inspired love, curiosity and criticism, not to mention a cookbook, campaign reform and plenty of urban legends in the 80 years since James A. Dewar created them. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

The Most Influential Brands of 2090

Media Guy’s Grandson Reports From the Future (No Hot-Tub Time Machine Required!)

Apparently “Media Guy” Grandpa Simon wrote a lot of so-called listicles. So when Ad Age asked me to come up with a list of some of the most influential brands of 2090 — and to look back at where they were 80 years ago (if they were even around back then) — I jumped at the chance. <!–FULL ARTICLE–>

Up in Smoke: Documents From the Annals of Tobacco Marketing

Up in Smoke: Documents From the Annals of Tobacco Marketing

A Collection of Internal Memos, Press Releases and Reports That Changed the Way Cigarettes Were Sold

CHICAGO (AdAge.com) — Advertising Age’s 80th anniversary report includes three major tobacco-related events. Here is a sampling of documents related to those events.

http://adage.com/adage80/

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Unilever Puts in Face Time With the Chinese Consumer


Ad Age Tags Along With Greater China Chairman Alan Jope as He Examines the Aspirations, Buying Habits of a Middle-Class Family

Posted by Normandy Madden

SHANGHAI (AdAge.com) — Alan Jope’s schedule last week illustrates the importance of the Chinese market for multinationals in almost every industry.

ON-THE-SPOT ADJUSTMENTS: After Alan Jope learned that Zu Quingrong  couldn't understand the entire Omo range of laundry products, he told  staff to ramp up improved packaging designs.
ON-THE-SPOT ADJUSTMENTS: After Alan Jope learned that Zu Quingrong couldn’t understand the entire Omo range of laundry products, he told staff to ramp up improved packaging designs.

Unilever’s chairman for Greater China had dinner dates in Shanghai with Fortune 500 CEOs including Omnicom Group CEO John Wren and a visiting U.K. government minister.

But the meeting on his agenda most likely to help Unilever achieve its 20% revenue-growth goal this year was not with an elite power broker. It was an afternoon he spent hanging out with Zu Qingrong, a 41-year-old woman from Dalian, a city in northeast China.

Ms. Zu is one of dozens of Chinese men and women who have allowed Mr. Jope into their homes since he moved to China in April 2009.

An outgoing, curious Scotsman, Mr. Jope pries into their daily lives, asking about hygiene practices, internet-surfing habits, finances and child-care philosophies, along with fears and dreams. And, of course, he asks how and where they consume food and personal-care products. Sometimes the conversation even turns to topics such as political beliefs and extramarital affairs — nothing is off-limits. After these visits, Mr. Jope will tell managers to switch dollars to online advertising, tweak packaging or the like.

On the ground
To show just how valuable these first-hand encounters are for China’s second-biggest advertiser after Procter & Gamble, Mr. Jope invited Advertising Age to tag along on his visit to Ms. Zu’s home. We were joined by Unilever Senior Brand Manager Subrina Liu and Kitty Lun, chairman-CEO, China at Lowe Worldwide, which handles creative for brands such as Omo detergent and Lux.

“It’s easy to distance ourselves from consumers in this ivory tower,” said Mr. Jope, with a sweeping gesture toward Unilever’s modern and airy 22,000 square-meter regional headquarters in Shanghai, with an even bigger R&D center across the street.

“I try to do some sort of consumer connect monthly, usually in combination with a market visit to a customer or retail check outside Shanghai,” he said. That’s a routine he’s followed since joining Unilever in 1985. He’s been inside hundreds of homes in developed nations including the U.S., U.K., France and Germany, and in emerging markets such as Brazil, Russia, South Africa, Mexico, Colombia and Senegal. He once spent 24 hours with a Muslim family living outside Jakarta, Indonesia.

Today’s session is with a bubbly middle-class woman who lives in Shanghai with her husband, an engineer for Philips, and their 8-year-old daughter.

The lively and self-confident daughter of a Chinese navy captain and a doctor, Ms. Zu works as a freelance consultant advising parents about overseas study options for their children. She has never left China but craves the opportunity to travel abroad and insists on conversing with Mr. Jope in English “to practice.”

Comfortable life
The Zu household’s monthly income of $2,200 is high but not uncommon for a tier-one city like Shanghai, where incomes are steadily rising, making it easier for consumers to afford international brands such as Lux shampoo and Walls ice cream.

The Zus can’t afford a car “yet,” but their lifestyle is comfortable. They have three computers — a laptop for each parent and a desktop for their daughter — as well as satellite TV and wireless internet access. Her husband has a Nokia E71 smartphone while Ms. Zu has two phones, including a Sony Ericsson.

Ms. Zu goes online for e-mail, Skype calls to overseas friends, and news and beauty tips on 163.com, China’s biggest site. She chats with other moms on online bulletin boards. She’s afraid to shop online, so a work colleague organizes her purchases on Alibaba’s Taobao.com site — mainly food, clothing and cosmetic brands from Dalian.

She uses QQ.com, Tencent’s popular instant-messaging platform, to organize weekend dinners and soccer games with old friends from Dalian who also live in Shanghai. Her husband, meanwhile, spends hours online each evening playing games and downloading music.

Heavy use of digital media is common across China, a discovery Mr. Jope made during his very first home visit last spring. He immediately instructed every division head in China to devote at least 10% of their media budgets to online media. Leer más “Unilever Puts in Face Time With the Chinese Consumer”

Cartoon: PR Basics


It’s a well known fact that journalists have some sort of a love-hate relationship with media relations and communication professionals, generally speaking. Why they hate people PR practitioners is nothing short of a long list of reasons to be so. The alarming number of sub-par public relations ‘professionals’ who are devoted to delivering bad pitching practices and the annoyingly persistent publishing of blacklisted email address are just the tip of the iceberg.

In a recent article by Jonah Bloom, the editor of Advertising Age and former editor of PR Week, titled “With PR on the Rise, Here’s a Refresher Course in the Basics”, he talks about how a lot of marketers out there may need help to understand the basics of PR. TheZigBlog has kindly break down his article to sizeable chunks for us to digest; do read on to learn more from there.

In the meantime, here’s a tongue-in-cheek visualization to differentiate between advertising, marketing, public relations and branding done by ZagBook.

greatlover2greatlover3greatlover4

Online Media Gazette

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BEING HJ_HEINZ: LESSONS LEARNED FROM BRAND SQUATTING


…And How NOT to Behave When Being Squatted

When you’re a marketer wielding a hefty brand, it’s not easy discovering a social network you hardly paid attention to has blown up overnight — and, worse still, the name of your brand is being squatted by unofficial brand representatives.

That’s what happened with Heinz and Twitter. But this isn’t really Heinz’s story; it’s the story about its squatter.

On AdAge this week, Michael Werch, who squatted the HJ_Heinz handle for two weeks, describes his pre-squatter objectives and what he’s learned since. His qualifications: that the brand be global, with little social media presence, and that he be genuinely enthusiastic about it.

That’s how he settled on username @HJ_Heinz, where he posted photos of the famous ketchup bottle and shared tips, recipes and company lore in a positive voice.

Werch studied Heinz closely, noting residents of its native Pittsburgh share in the brand’s success, and engaging with them. He also registered the Twitter account under a number of Twitter directories. In short, he behaved like a responsible brand representative, at no cost to the oblivious ketchup label. Leer más “BEING HJ_HEINZ: LESSONS LEARNED FROM BRAND SQUATTING”