Showcase: Beautiful Jewelry Websites Created with Wix


Not all that sparkles is gold. It could be a really beautiful Wix website with images of gold, like these jewelry websites we have here today. The exquisite taste of the Wix users who created these sites is evident not only in the jewelry, but also in the web design itself. Beautiful photographs placed just right, wonderful use of typography and great product display are just some of the niceties these sites have to offer. These websites, created with the HTML5 website builder, do a terrific job in presenting jewelry pieces as prestige and desirable objects. This is not bling, this is class.

N.Historiae

Evidence Jewelry

WildThing

Shadia Saad Leer más “Showcase: Beautiful Jewelry Websites Created with Wix”

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Y… ¿un ‘plug-in’ no es un ‘complemento’? | manualdeestilo.com


manualdeestilo.com

Con el término inglés plug-in se hace referencia normalmente a distintas funciones optativas que mejoran el funcionamiento de otros programas, de los que dependen, o que les dotan de pequeñas nuevas capacidades.

En internet, esta palabra suele hacer referencia a dos conceptos: al complemento necesario en un navegador web para poder ver o ejecutar material multimedia de distintas fuentes (por ejemplo, para ver los vídeos de YouTube, es necesario descargar el complemento para Flash de Adobe) y a los accesorios (también llamado en inglés add-on) que mejoran o amplían las funciones del propio navegador.

Además de por complemento, en algunos casos también se puede traducir por extensión.

Adobe matará Flash para Android mañana


celularis.com

El estandar web más popular de la historia sigue cediendo, sólo horas de vida le quedan a Flash para AndroidAdobe confirma que a partir de mañana la aplicación no se podrá descargar y eliminarán cualquier vía oficial para instalarlo en los terminales basados en el SO móvil de Google.

Flash cerrado

Que moriría no es noticia nueva, ya lo sabíamos y el cese del soporte se recalcó hace unas semanas cuando se dio a conocer Android 4.1 Jelly Bean. Sin embargo, no fue hasta ahora que Adobe se manifestó y reveló el momento en que matará definitivamente a Flash para Android.

Esto no quiere decir que de tener el APK no lo podrán instalar más adelante y mucho menos dejará de funcionar a quienes ahora mismo lo tienen instalado en sus terminales. Sólo no habrá ningún tipo soporte para correcciones de fallos o futuras actualizaciones para mejorar la compatibilidad porque es inevitable el avance. Leer más “Adobe matará Flash para Android mañana”

How to design the best website user experience

The Navigation System
No, we’re not talking about your GPS. But you might glean some perspective from the consumer products all around you. Long before the internet (or GPS) was mainstream, industrial designers had been honing and advancing user interfaces for manual operation. Whether it was the car stereo or the VCR, they recognized that comprehensive controls were pivotal in making their products viable. Things are starting to come full circle (who knew?!) with the advent of touchscreen and the desire to develop & design responsive websites for displays of various device types. The new norm will soon be conforming your site for display on car stereos! Until then, let’s focus on what you need to consider today to create a compelling website navigation system.
Use conventional placement
Why? Humans are creatures of habit. There is a reason you see top-of-the-screen navigation on the majority of websites. It is functional because people read from the top down. It is effective because it communicates a lot across a wide piece of real estate without hogging it up. Logically, you can’t go wrong with a menu at the screen’s top because people are looking for it up there by default.


http://www.gomediazine.com

Greetings & Salutations

My name is Wilson Revehl, Co-founder, CTO, and Vice-President of Go Media. When William Beachy and I founded the firm in 2003, merging our respective freelance businesses, I would not have imagined we’d become a publisher. And lord knows I haven’t done much to advance that cause. Jeff Finley, our first principle partner, deserves most of the credit for advancing our readership. The last time I wrote a Zine article was in 2007, about Flash, which has since become irrelevant.

I built my first website in 1996 on Yahoo’s GeoCities wysiwyg. I’ve been immersed in the world of syntaxcurly braces and for loops ever since. Today, I can read and write in all the major web programming languages, but still prefer PHP & Javascript. My skill-sets are perpetually in high demand. That’s great, except maybe I’ve been using it as an excuse to put article writing on the back burner. I’m hoping to change all of that. I want to contribute more knowledge to the design community moving forward.

Usability fundamentals of modern website design

Months after we launched a brand-new site design for our client, they returned. They wanted a new homepage. They were a market-savvy bunch who had tracked visitor click-through and retention. The idea was to alter the layout to rev up visitor engagement. I wholeheartedly endorsed the endeavor.

An organization who has the means and is willing to test differing user experiences will find that it offers constructive insight into their marketplace. However, most small businesses don’t have the budget to refresh their website design or layout whenever they want. That is why it’s crucial to design a thoughtful website user experience the first time.

Here, we’ll cover some usability basics for modern websites. The goal is to show you pragmatic dos & don’ts to ensure you’re taking advantage of best practices and conventions.

The Navigation System

No, we’re not talking about your GPS. But you might glean some perspective from the consumer products all around you. Long before the internet (or GPS) was mainstream, industrial designers had been honing and advancing user interfaces for manual operation. Whether it was the car stereo or the VCR, they recognized that comprehensive controls were pivotal in making their products viable. Things are starting to come full circle (who knew?!) with the advent of touchscreen and the desire to develop & design responsive websites for displays of various device types. The new norm will soon be conforming your site for display on car stereos! Until then, let’s focus on what you need to consider today to create a compelling website navigation system.

Use conventional placement

Why? Humans are creatures of habit. There is a reason you see top-of-the-screen navigation on the majority of websites. It is functional because people read from the top down. It is effective because it communicates a lot across a wide piece of real estate without hogging it up. Logically, you can’t go wrong with a menu at the screen’s top because people are looking for it up there by default.

No design works unless it embodies ideas that are held common by the people for whom the object is intended.

– Adrian Forty

Top Navigation… Leer más “How to design the best website user experience”

Flash-centric misconceptions of HTML5

Technical overview of HTML 5

The fifth major revision to the language of the World Wide Web can be written in both HTML and XML syntax and has been specially integrated with detailed processing models to facilitate interoperable implementations, and at the same time improve markup for HTML documents and web applications. Its core purpose is to solve cross-platform dependency in the web industry.

If all this sounds Greek to you, let’s break down what HTML5 does into a language that is easily understood, without getting into the complex technicalities:

HTML5 is an updated markup language that follows XML standards.
The idea behind HTML5 is to ensure consistency in the performance and output of web products on all operating systems including iOS, Android, Windows amongst many others.
Most common misconceptions regarding HTML are design centric. So, let’s take a look at what is offered by HTML 5 from the design point of view.

Built-in audio and video support that helps embed media directly into HTML documents has made the use of outside plugins redundant.
HTML5 supports SVG and Canvas elements for animations.
Offers designers a canvas element that facilitates rendering 2D graphics in ‘immediate mode’. This means graphical objects are directly rendered to the display.
Has been developed for creating interactive applications that are content heavy and are not only user-friendly, but also SEO-friendly.


With close to a decade of experience in web design, I have come across plenty of mistaken beliefs about the latest design tools and technologies; but nothing beats the misconceptions surrounding the use of HTML 5.

As developers, we have our own set of misguided beliefs about a certain technology, but as we begin to use that technology we are able to understand what it is all about, its usage, and its scope.

Inspired by certain HTML5 requirements that I have come across through the course of time, I wanted to add my two cents to clear the air on certain aspects of HTML5. Most of the misconceptions surrounding HTML5 are because many people think it’s a replacement for Flash.

At the outset, I would like to make it clear that this is not an HTML5 vs. Flash post. The truth is that one cannot act as the replacement for the other, so there is no ‘us vs. them’ battle. But, therein is the nub of the misconceptions. The problem is that people believe HTML5 is an enhanced alternative to Flash. All misconceptions are a result of this thinking.

Leer más “Flash-centric misconceptions of HTML5”

Landing Pages 3.0: How Content & Context Plays A More Meaningful Role

Most of the fields on the form were required. The “submit” button was still in vogue. And the payoff for filling out the form? A phone call from a sales rep.

Okay, so this first generation of landing pages wasn’t very good. But such pages were effective enough in lead generation that they got the ball rolling. Marketers started to wonder what they could do to make landing pages better.
Landing Pages 2.0: The Beginning Of Best Practices

To me, 2008 was the year when a new generation of landing pages took off — call it Landing Pages 2.0.

Two great books came out that year, Landing Page Optimization by Tim Ash and Always Be Testing by Bryan Eisenberg, and launched what I would characterize as the “best practices” era of landing pages.

Best practices were things that everyone using landing pages could — or should — follow. They included:

A/B and multivariate (MVT) testing — test, test, test your ideas
“message match” continuity between ads/emails and their landing pages
shorter and friendlier forms with better calls-to-action (CTAs)
emphasis on text content (not Flash!) to improve SEO and quality scores
“social proof” with logos, awards, certifications, testimonials, etc.

A year and a half ago, I put together the READY Conversion Optimization Framework as a broad summary of the most universal landing page best practices of the time:


by  | http://searchengineland.com

Landing pages have evolved a lot over the past five years.

Back in 2007, landing pages were almost cliché — what I would call Landing Pages 1.0. Take this example from Google — yes, Google — with the prototypical structure: a headline, a short description or some bullets, a small image (“hero shot”), and a form.

A Google landing page in 2007 Leer más “Landing Pages 3.0: How Content & Context Plays A More Meaningful Role”

What the Demise of Flash Means for the User Experience

Adobe’s decision to cease development of the mobile Flash platform and increase their investment in HTML5-related efforts created perhaps the final piece of conclusive evidence that HTML5 is the current go-to technology for creating ubiquitous user experiences regardless of device.

While there’s been an abundant amount of discussion on what this means to developers, there’s been a lack of focus on what this means to the overall user experience (UX). If HTML5 thrives where Flash struggled and becomesthe dominator in the choice for new mobile and desktop technology, will users benefit from the transition? Yes, as long as designers and developers do their jobs right.

Different stroke for different folks

Apples and oranges. The question is, which one’s Flash?

It might seem strange to compare Flash and HTML5 at all, since they are so inherently different. Whereas Flash is proprietary, HTML5 is continually developing through open source collaboration. If Flash is a seasoned monarchy, then HTML5 is the wild wild west. It’s important to note that there are tons of applications and sites in which Flash and native apps will remain the preferred choice of implementation. However, that doesn’t mean that we can’t explore the major differences between the two in order to discuss the gaps that HTML5 can fill where Flash is lacking.

Flash, by nature, is a control freak. It demands browsers have the latest plugin, or it will be sure to let you know if it’s unhappy with your version – perhaps even go on strike until you upgrade. It thrives on presenting a consistent, desktop-centric experience of typefaces and layout, and never bothers to worry about changing the user experience based on device nor the context of what you might want to do on that device. But Flash has had years to evolve from the land of bouncy ball demos and splash screens to the product for creating some fantastically innovative interfaces.

By contrast, HTML5 excels at giving users a delightfully inconsistent experience on any device through the concepts of “graceful degradation” and “progressive enhancement.” Both concepts are designed to provide users the best possible experience each browser allows for, whether a content area displays a static image in Internet Explorer 6, or a fully functional HTML5 video in Chrome. Since desktop browser usage runs the entire spectrum of worst- to best-case scenarios, this way of designing user experiences can help ensure that all users get the most bang for their buck out of their browsers. Gone are the days of being forced into creating identical experiences based on the best performance of the worst browser.

Those who advocate web standards also support the important role HTML5 plays in responsive web design, or the systematic display of content, tasks, and layout, depending on whether the user is viewing the site on a mobile or desktop-sized browser. The reasons why people view the same website on a mobile device versus a desktop is often very different. For example, a user viewing a site for a restaurant while sitting at their office desk could likely want to view a workflow more supportive of exploring the menu, reviews and other content that would help decide if it’s a good place to eat. On the other hand, a user viewing the site from the passenger seat of a car might want to quickly find content based on the assumption that they have already decided to eat there, such as directions or the phone number.


By SuAnne Hall  
http://www.uxbooth.com/blogSuAnne Hall

Adobe’s decision to cease development of the mobile Flash platform and increase their investment in HTML5-related efforts created perhaps the final piece of conclusive evidence that HTML5 is the current go-to technology for creating ubiquitous user experiences regardless of device.

While there’s been an abundant amount of discussion on what this means to developers, there’s been a lack of focus on what this means to the overall user experience (UX). If HTML5 thrives where Flash struggled and becomesthe dominator in the choice for new mobile and desktop technology, will users benefit from the transition? Yes, as long as designers and developers do their jobs right.

Different stroke for different folks

Apples and oranges. The question is, which one’s Flash?

It might seem strange to compare Flash and HTML5 at all, since they are so inherently different. Whereas Flash is proprietary, HTML5 is continually developing through open source collaboration. If Flash is a seasoned monarchy, then HTML5 is the wild wild west. It’s important to note that there are tons of applications and sites in which Flash and native apps will remain the preferred choice of implementation. However, that doesn’t mean that we can’t explore the major differences between the two in order to discuss the gaps that HTML5 can fill where Flash is lacking.

Flash, by nature, is a control freak. It demands browsers have the latest plugin, or it will be sure to let you know if it’s unhappy with your version – perhaps even go on strike until you upgrade. It thrives on presenting a consistent, desktop-centric experience of typefaces and layout, and never bothers to worry about changing the user experience based on device nor the context of what you might want to do on that device. But Flash has had years to evolve from the land of bouncy ball demos and splash screens to the product for creating some fantastically innovative interfaces.

By contrast, HTML5 excels at giving users a delightfully inconsistent experience on any device through the concepts of “graceful degradation” and “progressive enhancement.” Both concepts are designed to provide users the best possible experience each browser allows for, whether a content area displays a static image in Internet Explorer 6, or a fully functional HTML5 video in Chrome. Since desktop browser usage runs the entire spectrum of worst- to best-case scenarios, this way of designing user experiences can help ensure that all users get the most bang for their buck out of their browsers. Gone are the days of being forced into creating identical experiences based on the best performance of the worst browser.

Those who advocate web standards also support the important role HTML5 plays in responsive web design, or the systematic display of content, tasks, and layout, depending on whether the user is viewing the site on a mobile or desktop-sized browser. The reasons why people view the same website on a mobile device versus a desktop is often very different. For example, a user viewing a site for a restaurant while sitting at their office desk could likely want to view a workflow more supportive of exploring the menu, reviews and other content that would help decide if it’s a good place to eat. On the other hand, a user viewing the site from the passenger seat of a car might want to quickly find content based on the assumption that they have already decided to eat there, such as directions or the phone number. Leer más “What the Demise of Flash Means for the User Experience”